lisagor

A N   I N T E R V I E W   W I T H   A D A M   L I S A G O R

When I began my first year in college, we were required solely to use black and white 35mm. For this we had to process and print it all by hand. There were a lot of long days spent in the darkroom and on top of a 90 minute commute to and from college each day, the spare time piled up. I tried audiobooks with moderate success but the attention span just wasn’t there for me. Then I discovered podcasts and with that, my obsession with a show called You Look Nice Today was born. I say ‘obsession and some of you may question how accurate that actually is but the playcount on several episodes has reached over 80. 

So then, in the years since first discovering the podcast, I began to learn more and more about the three gentlemen behind the it all. Scott Simpson is a former iTunes employee turned stand-up comedian. Merlin Mann is a man who isn’t sure what he does, but knows he wants to do it efficiently. And lastly, there’s Adam Lisagor, founder of Sandwich Video, a rising production company based in downtown Los Angeles. Adam is perhaps the straight man of the group, or maybe the younger brother, that’s the role he generally gets cast in but it’s his combination of unpolished wry wit and goofy off-timing that really got to me. 

Sandwich Video specialises in short explanatory style advertisements. This is Lisagor’s ace in the hole. He manages to create a body of work that encompasses other people’s products with his own ideas of representation. There isn’t anything elitist or pretentious about Lisagor’s productions. The videos are simply an extension of himself. A collection of short clips explaining how Adam sees individual pieces of the world. 

How did starting your own company, Sandwich Video, affect your creative freedom? Surely the business side of things must play a part in the decision making process along the line.
When you operate a business, you’re beholden to things outside of yourself. But the dichotomy of being a designer of sorts is that your business thrives on your creativity. Most often hopefully, and crucially, the business springs from the creativity and not the other way around. The way my business got started, the way I found out I even had a business to begin with, is that I was my own first client, and I was serving a business need without knowing it. So what sprang from that was unbridled creativity and the need to communicate effectively while imbuing the communication heavily with my own personality. But then, the funny thing that happened was that business entities outside myself started requesting my services, having identified what was unique to my previous work—the character—as the salable element. So without having premeditated it, I’d built a business around my creativity.
One danger of being known for a certain style or voice is that all future business assumes repeatability of that voice, and so the threat is that future work constrains you to what you’ve been known for in the past. The easiest way around this threat is to break away from the repeatability, other than the mark of your quality and taste, and experiment as soon and as often as possible, so that you become known for dexterity and range rather than for doing a great imitation of yourself.
When you can trade on creativity, and all future work relies on the promise of creativity, you’re in a good place. I’ve found that the important thing is not to get too far ahead of myself—to grow the business slowly so that I don’t find myself having to sacrifice the values that are important to me in order to keep the business running.

Your video work seems to be a translation of your personality a lot of the time. Maybe it’s more present in the videos which you also feature in but in the majority of them you really get the sense that this is something you’re excited about doing. It’s really relatable to the viewer when they get that feeling. For example, the Warby Parker spot you did with Noah Kalina. Kalina in that video was his usual understated self but it still seemed like a version of you from some of the other videos. There’s a real Woody Allen subjectivity thing going on.
That’s a tremendous compliment, but you don’t have to print this part. Just pretend like I didn’t even acknowledge it, like I’m a real dick who just expects such high praise as a matter of course. I think the part of myself that translates the most strongly to my video work is the way I express a concept, really. There have been times in my life where I’ve been tremendously, painfully awkward and shy in a social situation. And there have been times where I’m around people who are quick-witted and self-assured and I think I could never live up to their expectations of social company, so I’ve had a policy of keeping my mouth shut and having people interpret that as thoughtfulness. But what I’ve found is that I’m most eloquent when I’m explaining a concept to someone, in any size group. When it’s something that I have an intuitive understanding of, I like to watch myself figure out how to think like a person who doesn’t have the intuitive understanding of that thing, and put together the pieces of understanding one by one in the right order and with the right subjective presence to make it possible for other people to suddenly understand.
Part of this process is pace and knowing when different pieces of a concept can be introduced. Knowing what a person’s expectations are, and understanding where they have to be in order to receive the next pieces of a concept. I enjoy that type of communication and it comes naturally to me because my mom is a great teacher and that’s how she always explained things to me. I suppose that good writing comes from that, and good joke telling, to a certain extent, is knowing where an audience is at each stage of your story—having the empathy to project a lack of knowledge and then a knowledge, in that order. And knowing what the reaction will be to each stage of knowledge.
So that’s how my personality comes through in my videos. There’s a measured, careful sharing present in each of them. My videos aren’t blatantly goofy or overly expressive because I’m not that way in person. That doesn’t mean I don’t value the goofy or stupid or overt or ridiculous. I value those things sometimes because I don’t know how to be them. But I surround myself with people who maintain an even temper, and that’s what I would consider the Sandwich house style, so to speak.

Do you still make personal projects?
I just recently started making the most personal, most important project of my life, if you can get ready to hold back your barf literally with your fingers as it threatens to break through your closed lips and dribble onto your shirt. I and my partner Roxana had our first child, a little boy named Linus a couple weeks ago. There was a moment about three months into the pregnancy where I had an epiphany—that once this child is born, I no longer matter, biologically speaking. It’s an incredibly freeing thing to no longer be the center of the world and oh my god I just realized you were asking about video projects, I’m so sorry.

Are there people in life who taught you to actually direct or does that just come naturally when you have a vision for a project?
This is a great question. I did go to film school at the highly reputable NYU Collegiate Academy for Cinemasophic Studies for the Advancement of Screen and Celluloid, but they didn’t teach me shit about directing. Or rather, if they did, I wasn’t listening or I skipped class that day which was not unusual. Before I ever showed up on set, some ten years after graduating, to direct for money for the first time, really, I’d been terrified of the idea. Does directing mean having a huge ego? Does directing mean talking about motivation or instinctively, almost telepathically knowing how to reach into an actor’s psyche and extract from him the one event of his life whose exploitation could work to manipulate him emotionally for the benefit of the camera? Does it mean making a frame with your fingers and yelling at a lot of people at once, or just wearing jodhpurs and saying yes no no yes no yes yes no as quickly as possible? Does it mean going “Say it like this” to a guy and then saying it how you want the guy to say the thing? I had no idea, and no way of knowing. The only way of knowing is to actually start telling people what to do. The old adage “fake it til you make it” applies so forcefully to directing that I can stop answerng right now but I won’t. At first, you show up and you wonder why all these people around you are going to listen to anything you say since you’re such a fraud and they know it. But then you slowly start to realize that they can successfully do their jobs because you tell them what you like and what you don’t like. And the more confidence you have in telling them what you like and don’t like, the more they’ll trust you, the more you’ll trust yourself, the easier the process will be and the sooner you’ll all go home. 
Directing is two things, that I can think of right now. Number one is seeing in your head with as much clarity how you’d like something to go, be it the color of an actress’s skirt or the amount of haze in the frame or the exact pitch of an actor’s voice on a certain word or the blocking of scene 29 being parallel with the blocking of scene 2 and then correcting what actually happens until it gets closest to what you see in your head and number two is answering questions as quickly as possible. The big part of number one is that clarity of vision, and usually that vision is influenced in parts from all of what you’ve seen before you—be it the work of directors you’ve admired, or experiences in your life, or your imagination. But it’s a clarity that tells you with some certainty that there’s a way that things should go. And then, once everything turns out completely different from how you’d envisioned it, trying to compensate as best you can for the disparity and convincing yourself that it all happened intentionally.

How much of a role does the editing play in the final product for each You Look Nice Today episode? To me, half of the humour comes from the timing. Not even necessarily down to it always being the right timing but more the efficiency of it. I don’t think there’s anything in life that only lasts 30 to 45 minutes that can make me laugh that much.
Well, the easy formula for the show is that every 45-minute episode took 90 minutes to record and about 8 hours to edit. That’s a surprisingly consistent formula. My biggest source of inspiration for the feel and pace of the show was Dr. Katz, the animated squigglevision show by Loren Bouchard on Comedy Central in the 90s. The audio on that show was edited so tightly from mostly unscripted, improvised dialogue, and they could get away with it because, duh, it was animated. Arrested Development used some of those same pacing techniques with live action, where no joke has time to live longer than it’s supposed to, and everything is punchy. So I liked to think of YLNT as a cartoon without the animation, and it offered a lot of possibility for play, for experimentation. Of course, I got burned out on editing it, so the show went away for some time, until an intern I had hired, Claude Zeins, asked if he could take a crack at editing some uncut episodes of the show, and he proved to be great at it, so the show lived on for another year. Now, it seems we’re on a bit of an extended hiatus again, possibly for a decade or more.

In YLNT, there is an episode, ‘Truck Spank’, where the three of you discuss the best possible name to say for your coffee cup. As a send-off could you come up with a new one for readers here?
An alternate Truck Spank for the new millennium. I’m horrible at coming up with these on the spot. I think the one I came up with after that episode was Scott Lacrosserape, which isn’t at all funny. I swear, if I’m at Starbucks, and on a dare someone says, “You should come up with a fake name for them to write on the cup,” I’ll choke and stand there for six seconds and go, “My name is Adam. Shoot.” If really pressured, I’d probably go with Chambrayson Geeseflaps, who was one of my professors at NYU, where I went to film school to study film.
Here’s a fun game to exercise your silly name muscles: you play it with a partner. You go, “One, two, three” and then after three, you both have to say a fake song name by a fake band name, at the same time. And you end up mostly blurting out the thing that comes to you and you don’t even listen to the other person’s until a few seconds later when you play it back in you head and it’s ridiculous and you both laugh and then you start all over again. And everybody wins. 
One two three—Temples at Marveltron by Josué Pilsner and the Chambrayson Geeseflaps.

***********************

Adam Lisagor currently resides in Los Angeles and can be found online at the following:
Own Site | Sandwich Video | You Look Nice Today | Tumblr | Twitter

Photo Credits: Noe Montes, Adam Lisagor, Katie Spence

youtube

After watching the SmallDemons.com video by Adam Lisagor of SandwichVideo.com I wanted to know how to create the ferris wheel effect that appears in the video. 

Here’s how I did it:

-Create a null object.

-Create a text object.

-Parent the text object to the null object.

-Add the expression [ -parent.transform.rotation ] to the rotation of the text object.

-Eat some gummy bears.

-Rotate the null object and the text object will rotate around the null object and stay upright.

Links:

Small Demons Video - http://youtu.be/DSlY74J6iH8

http://sandwichvideo.com/

https://www.smalldemons.com/

Eric Darnell - LessFilms.com - Twitter: @lessfilms - @ericdarnell

Lisagor Winners 2012 [with (some) links]

LISAGOR WINNERS! [aggregated by Luis] (work in progress)

MULTIMEDIA COLLABORATION

Robert Herguth and Patrick Rehkamp, Better Government Association, Dane Placko, FOX Chicago News, Mark Suppelsa, WGN-TV, Marsha Bartel, WGN-TV, “ Credit Card Crackdown

EDITORIAL CARTOON

Roger SchillerstromCrain’s Chicago Business “Reelect Obama; O’Hare expansion plans; Illinois Pension Fund deficit; Chicago; Blago testifies; Illinois Secretary of State Department pay raises

FEATURE WRITING

Non-daily, circulation more than 20,000  

Bryan Smith, Chicago Magazine, “The Longest Wait’’

Non-daily, circulation less than 20,000 

Amanda Robert, Chicago Lawyer, “Legal implications exist for food trucks to find success

Online 

Staff, The Red Line Project, “10 Remember 9/11”  

Television 

Gia M. Amella, Allison Flexner, Giuseppe Mangione, Bill Wunner, Sheri England, Tony Whaley, Modio Media, “Terror in Tuscany: World War II Atrocities

Radio  

Rob Wildeboer and Cate Cahan, WBEZ, “Whatever happened to Marcus?”  

Daily newspaper, circulation 250,000 or more 

Colleen Mastony, Chicago Tribune, “A Family Vision

Daily newspaper, circulation 250,000 or less 

Catherine Ann Velasco, The Herald-News, “An Incredible Bond”

Specialty/Trade 

Howard Larkin, Hospitals & Health Networks Magazine, “Smart Money Management”  

FEATURE PHOTOGRAPHY, DAILY 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Charles Rex Arbogast, Associated Press, “Millennium Fog

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Jonathan Miano, The Times, “Air Show”  

PHOTOGRAPHY, NON-DAILY 

Non-daily publication, circulation more than 20,000 

Kerrie Kennedy, David Leslie Anthony, Melissa Miller, Jake Jarvi, Sheridan Road Magazine, “A Nutcracker Fantasy” 

Non-daily publication, circulation less than 20,000 

Joe Gallo and Jason Reblando, The Chicago Reporter, “Secure Communities

NEWS PHOTOGRAPHY, DAILY 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Kiichiro Sato, Paul Beaty, Charles Rex Arbogast and M. Spencer Green, Associated Press, “A Blizzard Slams The Windy City”

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Jonathan Miano, The Times, “Military couples: Strength through separation

DEADLINE REPORTING 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Michael Tarm, Karen Hawkins, Don Babwin, Associated Press, “Blagojevich Testimony (series of 3): Blagojevich takes the stand at corruption trial, launches campaign to win over jury with charm

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Staff , Daily Herald, “Walloped”  

Non-daily publication 

Bethany Krajelis, Chicago Daily Law Bulletin, “BlackBerry outage affects lawyers and law firms”  

NON-DEADLINE REPORTING 

Sharon Cohen, Associated Press, “Immigration Limbo

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Casey Toner and Lauren FitzPatrick, SouthtownStar, “Country Club Hills’ woes”

BREAKING NEWS 

Online  

Carlos Sadovi, David Elsner, Jeremy Gorner , Daniel Haar, Andrew Zuick and Liam Ford, Chicago Tribune, “The Beating of Brian DeLeon

Television 

Joe Kolina, Rob Stafford, Jennifer Lay-Riske, Allison Rosati, Carol Marin, Mary Ann Ahern, Natalie Martinez, Stefan Holt, Alex Perez, Phil Rogers, Don Moseley and 10 p.m. News Team WMAQ-TV, “Blagojevich Verdict”  

Radio 

Steve Grzanich, Bob Roberts, Bernie Tafoya , Steve Miller, WBBM Staff, WBBM Newsradio, “Blizzard!”  

NEWSCAST 

Radio 

Steve Grzanich, Keith Johnson, Duane Gray, Joe Collins, Susan Glick  and Jeff Joniak, WBBM Newsradio, “ 4 p.m. newscasts, Feb. 1, June 27 and July 12, 2011” 

Television 

Late Newscast  

Joe Kolina, Jennifer Lay-Riske, and 10 p.m. News Team,  WMAQ-TV, “Blizzard 2011, Blagojevich Verdict, Off-Duty Officer Killed”

NEWS WEB SITE 

Chicago Tribune Staff, chicagotribune.com

GENERAL EXCELLENCE, NON-ENGLISH 

Daily newspaper 

N/A

Non-daily publication, under 20,000 

Clemente Nicado, Ron Reason, Carolina Garcia, Kelly Yelmene, Alejandro Yanun, Elvira Collins, Brian Morowczysnki, Negocios Now

Television 

Noticiero Telemundo Chicago

NEIGBORHOOD/COMMUNITY NEWS, ONLINE 

Staff, TribLocal.com

DESIGN 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

James Smith, Chicago Sun-Times, “James Smith entry No. 2: 3 examples of page design by James Smith”

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Scott Helmchen, Northwest Herald, “Pests dé resistance, Hero worship, Hallows goodbye, Dawn breaks” 

Non-daily publication, circulation more than 20,000 

Stephanie Gladney, Time Out Chicago, “UPTOWN STORY; Changing of the GUARD; YOUR PERFECT PRIDE”

Non-daily publication, circulation less than 20,000 

Christine Wachter, The Chicago Reporter, “Loopholes, Empty Jackpot and The Allure of Secure”  

GRAPHICS 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Greg Good, Chicago Sun-Times

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Dave Lemery, Northwest Herald, “Bailed-out Banks; Steps of foreclosure; The War in Iraq”

Non-daily publication, circulation more than 20,000 

Karen Freese, Crain’s Chicago Business, “The State of Small Business: It’s a small business world”

Non-daily publication, circulation less than 20,000 

Christine Wachter, The Chicago Reporter, “Double whammy, On their way out, Securing the country from immigrants”

ILLUSTRATION 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Rick Tuma, Chicago Tribune, “Chicago Tribune Monday Business Profile

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Staff, Hoy, “¿Quién será?; Ficción y realidad; A donde vamos; Todos Ponen”

Non-daily publication, circulation more than 20,000 

Red Nose Studio and Tanja Pohl, Angie’s List Magazine, “Angie’s List Magazine cover illustrations”

EDUCATION REPORTING 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Diane Rado and Duaa Eldeib, Chicago Tribune, “School bosses’ windfall

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Kerry Lester, Daily Herald, “Impulse - What drove Angel Facio to stab his teacher, and series

SCIENCE, HEALTH, TECHNOLOGY, ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTING 

Radio 

Dan Weissmann and LaCreshia Birts, WBEZ, “A neuro-economist explains the latte dilemma: Are you really gonna pay $4 for coffee?”   

Television 

Ash-har Quraishi, Mike Prendergast, Basma Babar-Quraishi, Linda Fox and Tom Siegel, Chicago Tonight - WTTW, “Great Lakes Invasion”  

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Michael Hawthorne, Chicago Tribune, “Chicago Environment Exclusives”  

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Bowdeya Tweh, The Times, “Wellspring of opportunity? Environmental concerns fueling struggle over use of oil sands from Canada/ Impact stretches beyond refinery gates/Drawing a line over refining oil sands”  

MULTIMEDIA FEATURE PRESENTATION 

Online 

David Yanofsky, Cam Simpson and Flynn McRoberts, Bloomberg News, “Victoria’s Secret Revealed in Child Picking Organic Cotton

USE OF VIDEO 

Online 

Lance Booth, Northwest Herald, “Beyond the Game” 

USE OF DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY  

Online 

Alex Bordens, Brian Boyer and Joe Germuska, Chicago Tribune, “2011 Illinois school report cards” 

SPORTS STORY 

Radio 

Jeff Joniak, WBBM-AM, “Joniak’s Journal: Amobi Okoye” 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

 Mark Konkol, Chicago Sun-Times, “Worst. Season. Ever.

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Jim Owczarski,  Beacon News, “Court Redemption”

 Non-daily publication, circulation more than 20,000 

Steve Oney, Playboy, “The Fighter” 

SPORTS COMMENTARY 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Rick Telander, Chicago Sun-Times, “Murray Park: Can Heaven Still Be Found on a Playground?”

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Barry Rozner, Daily Herald, “Barry Rozner Columns” 

SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY  

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Tom Cruze, Chicago Sun-Times, “Harness Racing”

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

John Starks, Daily Herald, “Reflective wrestling”   

BUSINESS REPORTING 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Jared S. Hopkins,  Chicago Tribune, “Wrigley Rooftops Health Inspections”

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Keith Benman, The Times, “Utility, regulator planned to ‘party’/NiSource exec may get axed/ NiSource Inc. director to retire after perks offer”  

Television 

Leah Hope, Richard Hillengas, Jim Mastri, Casey Klaus, Annie Esp and Jeff Freeman,   

WLS-TV, “Special Segments: Leah Hope” 

Non-daily publication, circulation more than 20,000 

Bryan Gruley and Cliff Edwards, Bloomberg News, “Sony With Stringer Era Waning Searches for Hit as Payoff Year Eludes Grasp”  

Non-daily publication, circulation less than 20,000 

Angela Caputo, Kimbriell Kelly, Jeff Kelly Lowenstein and Louis McGill, The Chicago Reporter, “Loopholes

Specialty/Trade 

Megan Cottrell, Rui Kaneya, Samuel Charles, Dylan Cinti, Caitlin Huston and Alexis Pope, The Chicago Reporter, “Fishing for business”   

Radio 

Tony Arnold and Cate Cahan, WBEZ, “United Airline’s move downtown leaves suburban land behind

Online 

Katie Karpowicz, James Mazurek, Alaina Africano and Sarah Vonnegut-Gabovitch, The Red Line Project, “Business Ties: The State of Business Along Chicago’s Red Line” 

ARTS REPORTING AND CRITICISM 

Non-daily publication, circulation more than 20,000 

Jonathan Lethem, Playboy, “Kovacs’s Gift” 

Non-daily publication, circulation less than 20,000 

Aaron Wertheimer, Chicago Jewish Star, “Henry Miller & The Jews” 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Miriam DiNunzio, Chicago Sun-Times, “Standards, by Singers Who Aren’t”

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Matt Arado, Daily Herald, “Lollapalooza”   

INVESTIGATIVE REPORTING 

Online 

David Jackson, Brian Boyer, Gary Marx, Emily Chow, Abel Uribe and Steve Rosenberg, Chicago Tribune, “Across the Border/Beyond the Law” 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Jason Grotto, Ray Long, Jodi S. Cohen and Joe Germuska, Chicago Tribune,  Marsha Bartel and  Mark Suppelsa, WGN-TV, “Pension Games”  

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Marisa Kwiatkowski, The Times, “Casting concern/Senator: Make schools off-limits”  

Radio 

Rob Wildeboer and Cate Cahan, WBEZ, “What a police camera did NOT record”   

Television 

Mark Suppelsa, Marsha Bartel, Jason Grotto, Ray Long and Jodi S. Cohen, WGN-TV, “Pension Games”   

IN-DEPTH REPORTING, NON-DAILY PUBLICATION 

General-interest publication, circulation more than 20,000 

Ben Joravsky and Mick Dumke, Chicago Reader, “The grass gap; What is pot prosecution good for?; The $78 million bag; The Politics of Pot”  

General-interest publication, circulation less than 20,000 

Angela Caputo, Kimbriell Kelly, Dylan Cinti and Alexis Pope, The Chicago Reporter, “Out at first”   

Community newspaper, circulation less than 20,000 

Staff, Windy City Times, “AIDS @ 30”  

Business magazine or newspaper, circulation more than 20,000 

William Henderson and Rachel Zahorsky, ABA Journal, “Paradigm Shift”

Magazine or magazine section, circulation more than 20,000 

Bryan Smith, Chicago Magazine, “Loss of Innocence”

Magazine or magazine section, circulation less than 20,000 

Angela Caputo, Kimbriell Kelly, Phil Jacobson, Samantha Winslow, The Chicago Reporter, “Without a smoking gun”  

POLITICAL AND GOVERNMENT REPORTING 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Steve Warmbir, Chicago Sun-Times, “Corruption in Cicero”

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Casey Toner and Lauren FitzPatrick, SouthtownStar, “Country Club Hills’ woes”

IN-DEPTH NEWS STORY OR SERIES 

Radio 

Rob Wildeboer and Cate Cahan, WBEZ, “Under the Gun: Murder in Chicago and Toronto

Television  

Randi Belisomo and Adam DeBacker, WGN-TV, “Journey to Haiti (three-part series)”

Specialty/Trade 

 Sarah Karp, Catalyst Chicago, “The Right Move?”   

PUBLIC AFFAIRS PROGRAMMING 

Radio 

WBEZ Staff, “Cops and Neighbors” 

Television 

Tasha Ransom, Kimbriell Kelly, Nancy Langfels, Jay Sondheimer, Suzanne Dumetz-Cole and Russ Sherman, WPWR-TV and The Chicago Reporter “Living with ADHD

BEST REPORTER, BROADCAST 

Radio 

Bernie Tafoya, WBBM Newsradio

Television 

Paris Schutz, WTTW 

NEWS COLUMN OR COMMENTARY 

Specialty/Trade  

Neil McLaughlin, Modern Healthcare

Non-daily publication, circulation more than 20,000 

Greg Hinz, Crain’s Chicago Business, “Pension Math; The center gives; To win in Springfield, CME should fix pitch”

Non-daily publication, circulation less than 20,000 

Irv Leavitt, PioneerLocal, “1) Oh, the humanity !, 2) From Black Friday to Greed Thursday, 3) Haggis and rugby ? Scrum-tious”   

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000 

Mark Brown, Chicago Sun-Times


Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

Phil Kadner, SouthtownStar, “Phil Kadner’s columns” 

EDITORIAL WRITING 

Daily newspaper, circulation more than 250,000  

John McCormick, Chicago Tribune 

Daily newspaper, circulation less than 250,000 

David Rutter, SouthtownStar, “SouthtownStar Editorials”  

Non-daily publication, circulation more than 20,000 

Joe Cahill, Crain’s Chicago Business, “Stop playing favorites with tax money; Moto sale shows folly of special tax breaks; Formula for failure: all self-interest, no sacrifice”

Non-daily publication, circulation less than 20,000 

Jerry Moore, The Berwyn Life, “Know-nothings costing more than they should; Pesek must resign from D-201 board; Legislative scholarship program must end now”

BLOG 

Independent 

Melanie Coffee, She’s Write, “Being Brown in the Suburbs, No Burnt Crosses, but a Few Cross Looks 

Affiliated  

David Protess, Huffington Post, “1. Guilty Until Proven Innocent 2. The Murder of Innocence 3. A Prosecutor’s True Calling”   

START-UP

Staff, The Red Line Project

Burst

Without question, my favorite of the new features on the iPhone 5S is the camera’s burst mode. Enabling it is frictionless, and the UI for making selects and throwing out the rest is elegant as anything iOS has ever done.

This is Linus playing with a toy mirror. The sun underlights his face in only one frame. Without burst mode, impossible to capture. Look at him go.