Confederate Ninth-Plate From The Library Of Congress

Found this one from the Library of Congress, they have it with and without frame. He looks very modern, if I hadn’t found the link I would have thought it a fake. Ninth-plate tintype, hand-colored [Unidentified young soldier in Confederate artillery uniform and forage cap] Digital ID: (digital file from original item, mat removed) ppss 00237 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppss.00237 Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-27185 (digital file from original item) Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print Gift; Tom Liljenquist

A Fond Farewell to Changing America

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Photo: Gallery entrance to the Changing America exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of American History. 

Two fundamental advances in the American story, and how those actions affected this country, have been vividly celebrated in the “Changing America” exhibition at the National Museum of American History. The installation, created by the National Museum of African American History and Culture, examined the impact of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1893 and the March on Washington in 1963.

Only a few days are left to visit this innovative show that looks at this central arc of 100 years and not only explains the past but underscores the ongoing battles for equality in America. The exhibit closes Sunday September 7.

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Photo: Tintype of African American soldier. Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift from the Liljenquist Family Collection.

Entering the exhibition, the visitor can choose to first study the world of 1863. Many people, free, enslaved and sympathetic, challenged the system of slavery. The display of Nat Turner’s bible illustrates how powerful individuals were in this fight and how electrifying were the slave rebellions. The conditions that marked the hardships of slavery are captured in many items, including child shackles. The fight to maintain slavery is illustrated in the ads for runaways. How Abraham Lincoln came to issue the Emancipation Proclamation, the document considered a turning point in the country’s history, is part of the compelling narrative.

Yet, 100 years later, more than 250,000 people needed to march in the capitol to let the country and its leaders know the goal of equality, halted by segregation, lynching and minimal jobs, had not been attained.  They gathered at the Lincoln Memorial, which had become a place for celebration and protest since it was dedicated in 1922 and since the great contralto Marian Anderson had sung in 1939. The 1963 event is brought to life in posters, photographs and video of the day’s historic oratory, including Rev. Martin L. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech.

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Photo: March on Washington organizing manual, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture.

The stories remind people that these watershed events in 1893 and 1963 were not singular acts but part of a progression that will be reflected in the many narratives the museum will tell. Some of the visitors’ comments have reflected the power of these twin stories. “We have evolved from slaves to proud leaders,” wrote an 11-year-old. Noting that 50 years is not that long ago, a 48-year-old woman wrote “this march is my foundation, my beacon of the power of endurance and my peoples’ spirit of survival.”

After the artifacts are taken down, they are being prepared for the inaugural exhibitions for the museum’s opening in 2016. Artifacts that belonged to abolitionist Harriet Tubman, glass shards from the 16th St. Baptist Church bombing in 1963 and the pocket watch of Bayard Rustin, the organizer of the 1963 march, will be among the many prepared for display and their  everlasting lessons.   

For more information on the exhibition collection please visit: http://bit.ly/XW9wbc

Written by Jacqueline Trescott.

Unidentified Soldier In Union Sergeant’s Frock Coat And Forage Cap With Unidentified Woman In Dress And Hat With Veil Between 1861 And 1865

Layers Of Civil War Womens Clothing

List of the Civil War womens clothing that they wore starting next to the skin and working out in layers:

Layer 1
* Drawers (underpants) made of cotton or linen and trimmed with lace
* Chemise (long undershirt) usually made of linen
* Stockings held up with garters

Layer 2
* Corset or stays stiffened with whale bone
* Crinoline, hoop skirt, or 1 or 2 petticoats (dark color if traveling due to mud and dirt)

Layer 3
* Petticoat bodice, corset cover, or camisole

Layer 4
* Bodice
* Skirt, often held up with “braces” (suspenders)
* Belt
* Slippers made of satin, velvet, done in knit, or crochet

Layer 5 (outerwear for leaving the house)
* Shawl, jacket, or mantle
* Gloves or mitts
* Button up boots
* Parasol
* Bonnet or hat
* Bag or purse
* Handkerchief
* Fan sometimes made of sandalwood
* Watch pocket

Photo Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

http://www.visit-gettysburg.com/civil-war-womens-clothing.html

Unidentified African American Soldier in Union Uniform with wife and two daughters

This photo shows a soldier in uniform, a wife in dress and hat, and two daughters wearing matching coats and hats. In May 1863, U.S. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton issued General Order No. 143 creating the Bureau of U. S. Colored Troops. This image was found in Cecil County, Maryland, making it likely that this soldier belonged to one of the seven U.S.C.T. regiments raised in Maryland. (Source: Matthew R. Gross and Elizabeth T. Lewin, 2010)

Original photo in frame from the Liljenquist Collection http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/lilj/item/2010647216/

Unidentified Soldier of Company B, 86th New York Regiment in Uniform, Slouch Cap, and 3rd Corps Badge Next to Unidentified Woman

Women served patriotically in the Civil War and in the wartime effort sometimes receiving little or no praise.

Spies
Women served as spies for both the Confederate and Union armies. Some of these spies gathered information by flirting with male soldiers during social gatherings and eavesdropping as they discussed important war information.

Nurses
About 2,000 to 5,000 women served as nurses on both sides of the Civil War.

War Relief Workers
War relief efforts consisted of sewing circles or meetings where women made clothing and gathered hospital supplies, food, bedding and delivered them to local military encampments and hospitals

Secret Soldiers
Hundreds of women served as secret soldiers for the Confederate and Union armies. Although it was forbidden for women to serve in the military at the time, these women wore male disguises, used masculine names and were often only discovered by accident when being treated for injuries

Photo: Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

DeAnne Blanton, Women Soldiers of the Civil War , National Archives/ Jim Garamone, Civil War Spies: Good Intell Knows No Gender, U.S. Department of Defense/R.B., Yahoo! Contributor Network

Unidentified Child Named Carl Who Became a Civil War Soldier; with Handwritten Note and Lock of Hair in Case ca. 1856

Inscription on handwritten note: “My beloved son Carl taken from me on April 1, 1865, at age 18, killed at Dinwiddie. Flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.” (Hamlet, Act 5, Scene 2)

He was killed in combat during the fighting at Dinwiddie Court House (March 31) and Five Forks (April 1), shortly before Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. (Source: Matthew R. Gross and Elizabeth T. Lewin, 2010)
Possible identification: Carlos E. Rogers of Company K, 185th New York, who was killed on either March 29 or 30, 1865, at Quaker Road in Dinwiddie County. (Source: North South Trader’s Civil War, vol. 35, 2010, p. 55) Gift; Tom Liljenquist; 2010; (DLC/PP-2010:105)

Repository: Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, D.C. 20540 USA, hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Can You Help Identify Me?

Unidentified African American Soldier In Union Uniform

[between 1863 and 1865] 1 photograph : sixth-plate ambrotype, hand-colored ; 9.4 x 8.4 cm (case)

The photo is from Tom Liljenquist — he and his family have collected 1,000 of these images and donated them to the Library of Congress. But the photographs don’t feature generals and other high-ranking officers. Instead, they’re images of the enlisted men who fought for the Union and the Confederacy during the war. And only a handful of the soldiers have been identified. If you recognize a face from your family, a regiment, or a photographer’s painted studio backdrop, it can help LC with identification. 

Notes:

Title devised by Library staff.
Case: Berg, no. 2-54; vintage brass mat supplied by donor.
Deposit; Tom Liljenquist; 2011; (D 062).
Purchased from: Heritage Auctions, Dallas, Texas, 2011.
Forms part of: Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress). Photo lightened by TheCivilWarParlor

Can You Identify Me?

Unidentified Soldier In Confederate Uniform With Single Shot Percussion Pistol And D Guard Bowie Knife

The photo is from Tom Liljenquist — he and his family have collected 1,000 of these images and donated them to the Library of Congress. But the photographs don’t feature generals and other high-ranking officers. Instead, they’re images of the enlisted men who fought for the Union and the Confederacy during the war. And only a handful of the soldiers have been identified. If you recognize a face from your family, a regiment, or a photographer’s painted studio backdrop, it can help LC with identification.

[between 1861 and 1865] 1 photograph : ninth-plate ambrotype, hand-colored ; 7.6 x 6.4 cm (case) Photo lightened by TheCivilWarParlor

Notes:
Title devised by Library staff.
Case: Berg, no. 3-275S.
Deposit; Tom Liljenquist; 2012; (2010:105-5)
Forms part of: Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs 
Forms part of: Ambrotype/Tintype photograph filing series (Library of Congress).

Can You Help Identify Me?

Unidentified Soldier In Union Uniform With Forage Cap

Civil War Photographs from the Liljenquist Family Collection

Most of the people and photographers are unidentified, and LC wants to know more about them. If you recognize a face from your family, a regiment, or a photographer’s painted studio backdrop, it can help LC with identification.

[between 1861 and 1865] 1 photograph : ninth-plate ambrotype, hand-colored ; 7.6 x 6.4 cm (case) http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/civil-war-photographs/

Notes:
Title devised by Library staff.
Case: Berg, no. 2-103.
Gift; Tom Liljenquist; 2010; (DLC/PP-2010:105).
Purchased from: Lee’s Headquarters, Fredricksburg, Virginia, 2004.

Photo lightened by TheCivilWarParlor

Unidentified African American Union Soldier with a Rifle and Revolver

In front of painted backdrop showing weapons and American flag at Benton Barracks, Saint Louis, Missouri. Quarter-plate, hand-colored tintype. Liljenquist Family Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress
[Digital ID # ppmsca-36456] Photo Lightened @CivilWarParlor Tumblr.

Unidentified Soldier Of The 34th Indiana Infantry Regiment In Zouave Uniform

If you recognize a face from your family, a regiment, or a photographer’s painted studio backdrop, it can help LC with identification. [between 1861 and 1866] 1 photograph : ninth-plate tintype, hand-colored ; 7.5 x 6.3 cm (case) photo lightened by TheCivilWarParlor

Notes:
Title devised by Library staff.
Case: Berg, no. 3-274
The 34th Indiana Zouaves were also known as the “Morton Rifles.”
Deposit; Tom Liljenquist; 2012; (D066)
Purchased from: Matthew Fleming, Milan, Ohio, 2011.
Forms part of: Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs 
Published in: Military images. Henryville, Pa., March-April 1994 (XV, 5), p. back cover.

Can You Identify Me?

Unidentified Soldier In Norfolk “Light Blues” Virginia Light Artillery Battery Uniform

The photo is from Tom Liljenquist — he and his family have collected 1,000 of these images and donated them to the Library of Congress. But the photographs don’t feature generals and other high-ranking officers. Instead, they’re images of the enlisted men who fought for the Union and the Confederacy during the war. And only a handful of the soldiers have been identified. If you recognize a face from your family, a regiment, or a photographer’s painted studio backdrop, it can help LC with identification.

[between 1861 and 1865] 1 photograph : sixth-plate ambrotype, hand-colored ; 9.8 x 8.8 cm (case) Rees, Charles R.„ photographer. Photo lightened by TheCivilWarParlor

Notes:
Title devised by Library staff.
Case: Berg, no. 1-93.
Deposit; Tom Liljenquist; 2012; (2010:105-5)
Purchased from: Bill Turner, La Plata, Maryland, 2011.
Forms part of: Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs 
Forms part of: Ambrotype/Tintype photograph filing series (Library of Congress).

Three unidentified soldiers in Union 1st Lieutenant, 1st Sergeant, and Master sergeant uniforms

[Three unidentified soldiers in Union 1st Lieutenant, 1st Sergeant, and Master sergeant uniforms]

[between 1861 and 1865] Ambrotype/Tintype filing series (Library of Congress) (DLC) 2010650518

Liljenquist Family collection (Library of Congress) (DLC) 2010650519

1 photograph : quarter-plate tintype, hand-colored ; 11.9 x 9.3 cm (case)

Unidentified African American Soldier in Union Uniform and Gloves with Musket

Another soldier waits at his side. Sixth-plate, hand-colored tintype. Liljenquist Family Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress. Photo Lightened @CivilWarParlor Tumblr.
[Digital ID # ppmsca-27091]

Teenagers in the Civil War- 

Quote by 16 year old regimental musician-

"I passed … the corpse of a beautiful boy in gray who lay with his blond curls scattered about his face and his hand folded peacefully across his breast. He was clad in a bright and neat uniform, well garnished with gold, which seemed to tell the story of a loving mother and sisters who had sent their household pet to the field of war. His neat little hat lying beside him bore the num¬ber of a Georgia regiment …. He was about my age …. At the sight of the poor boy’s corpse, I burst into a reg¬ular boo hoo and started on."

John A. Cockerill, 16, Union regimental musician, at Pittsburg Landing, Mississippi, April 1862, quoted in Emmy E. Werner, Reluctant Witnesses, 25

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