After a series of redesigns, Google Groups is effectively dead for research purposes. The archives, while still online, have no means of searching by date. Google News Archives are dead, killed off in 2011, now directing searchers to just use Google. Google Books is still online, but curtailed their scanning efforts in recent years, likely discouraged by a decade of legal wrangling still in appeal. The official blog stopped updating in 2012 and the Twitter account’s been dormant since February 2013. Even Google Search, their flagship product, stopped focusing on the history of the web. In 2011, Google removed the Timeline view letting users filter search results by date, while a series of major changes to their search ranking algorithm increasingly favored freshness over older pages from established sources. (To the detriment of some.)

Would anyone out there like to participate in the Winter Reading Program I’m running at my library?

I’m encouraging you to cozy up with a good book (or five) and make a bingo! Simply read five books in a row/column/diagonal that fit these categories — and share your books with everyone!

The goal is to read diversely — you can tailor your Bingo to pick up a few squares with books you might already have on your to-read list, but hopefully you’ll discover some great new books in genres or categories you don’t normally read!

I’ll be playing along, too, so track the “Cait Reads” tag — and please tag me in your own posts!

(This program is a bit tailored to my library, so for the “Staff Picks” cart, check out something from my Goodreads account, or ask your local librarian for a favorite, and for the Library eBook square, you can just go with a plain ol’ eBook from whichever online retailer you prefer.)

Google wrote its mission statement in 1999, a year after launch, setting the course for the company’s next decade:

“Google’s mission is to organize the world’s information and make it universally accessible and useful.”

For years, Google’s mission included the preservation of the past.

In 2001, Google made their first acquisition, the Deja archives. The largest collection of Usenet archives, Google relaunched it as Google Groups, supplemented with archived messages going back to 1981.

In 2004, Google Books signaled the company’s intention to scan every known book, partnering with libraries and developing its own book scanner capable of digitizing 1,000 pages per hour.

In 2006, Google News Archive launched, with historical news articles dating back 200 years. In 2008, they expanded it to include their own digitization efforts, scanning newspapers that were never online.

In the last five years, starting around 2010, the shifting priorities of Google’s management left these archival projects in limbo, or abandoned entirely.
After a series of redesigns, Google Groups is effectively dead for research purposes. The archives, while still online, have no means of searching by date.

Google News Archives are dead, killed off in 2011, now directing searchers to just use Google.

Google Books is still online, but curtailed their scanning efforts in recent years, likely discouraged by a decade of legal wrangling still in appeal. The official blog stopped updating in 2012 and the Twitter account’s been dormant since February 2013.

Even Google Search, their flagship product, stopped focusing on the history of the web. In 2011, Google removed the Timeline view letting users filter search results by date, while a series of major changes to their search ranking algorithm increasingly favored freshness over older pages from established sources. (To the detriment of some.)

Two months ago, Larry Page said the company’s outgrown its 14-year-old mission statement. Its ambitions have grown, and its priorities have shifted.
Google in 2015 is focused on the present and future. Its social and mobile efforts, experiments with robotics and artificial intelligence, self-driving vehicles and fiberoptics.

As it turns out, organizing the world’s information isn’t always profitable. Projects that preserve the past for the public good aren’t really a big profit center. Old Google knew that, but didn’t seem to care.

The desire to preserve the past died along with 20% time, Google Labs, and the spirit of haphazard experimentation.

Google may have dropped the ball on the past, but fortunately, someone was there to pick it up.

When you think of a librarian, what image comes to mind? Photographer Kyle Cassidy ventured to the American Library Association’s Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia in January to explore that question. In between networking, educational events, and panels, librarians from across the country stopped by Cassidy’s makeshift studio to sit for…

Развернуть

It’s Jane Austen’s birthday today! In her honor, why not dig into a re-telling of one of her classic novels?

  1. Longbourn by Jo Baker
  2. Jane and the Canterbury Tale by Stephanie Barron
  3. Pride and Prescience by Carrie Bebris
  4. Death Comes to Pemberley by P. D. James
  5. Pride and Prejudice and Zombies by Seth Grahame-Smith
  6. For Darkness Shows the Stars by Diana Peterfreund
  7. Mr. Darcy Takes a Wife by Linda Berdoll
  8. The Perfect Bride for Mr. Darcy by Mary Simonsen
  9. Sass and Serendipity by Jennifer Ziegler
  10. Prom and Prejudice by Elizabeth Eulberg
  11. Prada and Prejudice by Mandy Hubbard
  12. Emma adapted by Nancy Butler
  13. Sense and Sensibility adapted by Nancy Butler
  14. Pride and Prejudice adapted by Nancy Butler
  15. Northanger Abbey adapted by Nancy Butler
  16. Bridget Jones’ Diary by Helen Fielding
  17. Northanger Abbey by Val McDermid
  18. Sense and Sensibility by Joanna Trollope
  19. Lost in Austen
  20. Bride and Prejudice
  21. The Lizzie Bennet Diaries
  22. The Jane Austen Book Club by Karen Joy Fowler
  23. Austenland by Shannon Hale
Some Of The Most Majestic Libraries In The World

#1 St. Florian Monastery, Austria

#2 Biblioteca Real Gabinete Portugues De Leitura, Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

#3 Trinity College Library, Dublin, Ireland

#4 Bibliothèque Nationale De France, Paris, France

#5 The National Library Of Prague, Prague, Czech Republic

#6 The Old Public Library Of Cincinnati, Ohio, Usa

#7 Handelingenkamer Tweede Kamer Der Staten-generaal Den Haag Iii, Netherlands

#8 The National Library Of China, Beijing, China

#9 George Peabody Library, Baltimore, Maryland, Usa

#10 The Admont Library, Admont, Austria

#11 The Iowa State Law Library, Iowa, Usa

#12 Bibliothèque Sainte Geneviève, Paris, France

#13 The City Libary, Stuttgart, Germany

#14 The Library Of Congress, Washington, D.c., Usa

#15 Austrian National Library, Vienna, Austria

#16 Walker Library, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Usa

#17 Bibliothèque Mazarine, Paris, France

#18 Vennesla Library, Vennesla, Norway

#19 Library Of Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany

#20 Seattle Central Library, Seattle, Washington, Usa

#21 Book Mountain, Spijkenisse, Netherlands

#22 The Oberlausitzische Library Of Science, Gorlitz, Germany

#23 Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University, Connecticut, Usa

#24 Biblioteca Angelica, Rome, Italy

#25 Jose Vasconcelos Library, Mexico