liberty-bell

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. (Declaration of Independence, 1776)

On July 8, 1776, the Liberty Bell toll gathered citizens to hear the first public reading of the Declaration of Independence.

The Old Liberty Bell, Independence Hall, Philadelphia, Pa.

“Title and "80 (9648)” on label.“

Slide from the Keystone View Company Lantern Slides held by the College of Charleston Libraries.

We love art because it ENDURES. The Museum’s conservation staff not only sets an international standard for excellence, pioneering ways to protect works of art for future generations, but it also cares for our local and national heritage—having consulted on the preservation of the Liberty Bell.

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History Meme:
2/8 Objects » Liberty Bell

The Liberty Bell is an iconic symbol of American independence, located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Formerly placed in the steeple of the Pennsylvania State House (now renamed Independence Hall), the bell was commissioned from the London firm of Lester and Pack (today the Whitechapel Bell Foundry) in 1752, and was cast with the lettering (part of Leviticus 25:10) “Proclaim LIBERTY throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof.” It originally cracked when first rung after arrival in Philadelphia, and was twice recast by local workmen John Pass and John Stow, whose last names appear on the bell. In its early years, the Liberty Bell was used to summon lawmakers to legislative sessions and to alert citizens to public meetings and proclamations. [X] [X]