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6 Things to Know Before Starting Your Workweek (Apr. 27)

6 Things to Know Before Starting Your Workweek (Apr. 27)

It’s really frustrating when life goes on…especially when you’re left behind. This week, I threw out my back for the first time and it…sucked. However, somehow exciting things kept happening during this workweek. It’s a mystery… FYI We managed to get Jason Lauritsen, Josh Berry, Sarah Schulz, and MANY more awesome folks to support SocialHRCamp on May 15. We are working on trying to get some…

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For Lauren Mackenzie, going that extra step to help students achieve success outside of the classroom is one of the greatest aspects of being an educator.

And among her latest teaching tools were honed this past winter break via the Bloomsburg University Teaching and Learning Enhancement Center’s Teaching Excellence Academy (TEA), which continues to motivate her to establish significant learning experiences for her students.

TALE works towards providing a progressive environment for collaboration while renewing and refreshing classroom methods between educators, reinforcing the importance of community and an education system that exchanges ideas among faculty from all disciplines.

“Ever since I started working with TEA, my vision has been to incorporate ideas and activities into the classroom that students will utilize in future internships, work experiences, or while studying abroad,” said Mackenzie, assistant professor of communication studies. “I hope by combining my experiences as well as the insights of my international students from Denmark and France, I will be able to reinforce core concepts that will create significant learning opportunities for students.”

According to Silas Lauritsen, a freshman foreign exchange student, her teaching style is one that leaves a lasting impact.

“As an exchange student, I especially can relate to many aspects we are learning and discussing in class,” Silas said. “I’ve personally been involved in many of the situations Mackenzie talks about, allowing me to be an excellent resource for the other American students. I have highly recommended this course to my Danish friends coming to study at Bloomsburg University in the fall.”

Silas said one of the most distinguishing features of the Intercultural Communication course is that it isn’t focused solely on walking out with a passing grade.

“Mackenzie’s goal isn’t for us to memorize, but to be able to apply what we’ve learned in real life through discussing samples of scenarios and cross cultural interactions that have been problematic over the years,” he said.

Mackenzie, who previously taught at the U. S. Air Force Culture and Language Center, focuses part of her instruction on providing students with her personal experiences traveling abroad and working across cultures.

As an educator, Mackenzie says he hopes her students will be able to walk away with the ability to apply what they’ve learned about communicating across cultures in the future during studying abroad trips, working with multicultural coworkers, or traveling internationally.

“I want my students to be able to understand the fundamental assumptions of intercultural communication, and know the importance of understanding that there is not just one way to communicate, ask a question, or give a compliment,” Mackenzie said. “There are so many cultural variations to understand and so much knowledge to be gained on the misunderstandings across cultures. I hope that by being equipped with this information at a young age, my students can graduate from Bloomsburg University with the ability to apply all that they’ve learned to real life experiences.”

— Rachael Scicchitano, senior communication studies major

[ Authors ]
A. D. Ayangeakaa, S. Zhu, R. V. F. Janssens, M. P. Carpenter, M. Albers, M. Alcorta, T. Baugher, P. F. Bertone, C. J. Chiara, P. Chowdhury, H. M. David, A. N. Deacon, B. DiGiovine, A. Gade, C. R. Hoffman, F. G. Kondev, T. Lauritsen, C. J. Lister, E. A. McCutchan, D. S. Moerland, C. Nair, A. M. Rogers, D. Seweryniak
[ Abstract ]
An extensive study of the level structure of 61Co has been performed following the complex 26Mg(48Ca, 2a4npg)61Co reaction at beam energies of 275, 290 and 320 MeV using Gammasphere and the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA). The low-spin structure is discussed within the framework of shell-model calculations using the GXPF1A effective interaction. Two quasi-rotational bands consisting of stretched-E2 transitions have been established up to spins I = 41/2 and (43/2), and excitation energies of 17 and 20 MeV, respectively. These are interpreted as signature partners built on a neutron {\nu}(g9/2)2 configuration coupled to a proton {\pi}p3/2 state, based on Cranked Shell Model (CSM) calculations and comparisons with observations in neighboring nuclei. In addition, four I = 1 bands were populated to high spin, with the yrast dipole band interpreted as a possible candidate for the shears mechanism, a process seldom observed thus far in this mass region.

Agency Overseeing Obama Trade Deals Filled With Former Trade Lobbyists

(This is an item from our new blog: Unofficial Sources.)

The Office of the United States Trade Representative, the agency responsible for negotiating two massive upcoming trade deals, is being led by former lobbyists for corporations that stand to benefit from the deals, according to disclosure forms obtained by The Intercept.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a proposed free trade accord between the U.S. and 11 Pacific Rim countries; the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) is a similar agreement between the U.S. and the E.U.

The Obama administration is pushing hard to complete both deals, which it says will increase U.S. trade opportunities. Critics say the deals will provide corporate interests with sweeping powers to challenge banking and environmental regulations.

Here is information on three major figures in the Trade Representative’s office, gleaned from their disclosure forms:

— Sharon Bomer Lauritsen, the assistant U.S. trade representative for agricultural affairs, recently lobbied for the Biotechnology Industry Organization, a trade group for biotech companies. Lauritsen’s financial disclosure form shows she made $320,193 working to influence “state, federal and international governments” on biotech patent and intellectual property issues. She worked for BIO as an executive vice president through April of 2011, before joining the Trade Representative office.

— Christopher Wilson, the deputy chief of mission to the World Trade Organization, recently worked for C&M International, a trade consulting group, where he represented Chevron, the Biotechnology Industry Organization, British American Tobacco, General Electric, Apple and other corporate interests. Wilson’s financial disclosure shows he made $250,000 a year, in addition to an $80,000 bonus in 2013, before he joined the Obama administration. Wilson left C&M International in February of 2014 and later joined the Trade Representative’s office. C&M International reportedly lobbied Malaysia, urging it to oppose tobacco regulations in Australia.

— Robert Holleyman, the deputy United States trade representative, previously worked as the president of the Business Software Alliance, a lobbying group that represents IBM, Microsoft, Adobe, Apple and other technology companies seeking to strengthen copyright law. Holleyman earned $1,141,228 at BSA before his appointment. Holleyman was nominated for his current position in February of last year.

These disclosures about the revolving door at the trade agency come after U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman received scrutiny over a special bonus paid to him in 2009 after he left Citigroup to join the Obama administration as deputy assistant to the president. Froman received more than $7.4 million from Citi in the year prior to joining the administration.

Critics note that under the TPP, corporations will be empowered to file lawsuits against governments to block laws that could impair future profits. The lawsuits would fall under special tribunals set up by the World Bank.

Many of the former clients of the trade officials now negotiating these agreements stand to gain immensely.

Sharon Bomer Lauritsen and Christopher Wilson both represented biotech companies. As economist Joseph Stiglitz has argued, the TPP could restrict competition in the pharmaceutical industry by undermining government regulation of drug prices and by creating new rules to obstruct the introduction of generic drugs.

Robert Holleyman represented software companies. According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the TPP “contains DRM [Digital Rights Management] anti-circumvention provisions that will make it a crime to tinker with, hack, re-sell, preserve, and otherwise control any number of digital files and devices that you own.”

The contents of the trade deals are secret and therefore still veiled from scrutiny by the public and even most members of Congress. Only trade officials and select corporate representatives have been able to review them.

Despite growing opposition to both deals, Finance Committee Chair Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, may introduce legislation this week to provide President Obama with “fast track” authority to limit congressional review over and expedite approval of the agreements.

Photo of United States Trade Representative Michael Froman. (Alex Wong/Getty)

The post Agency Overseeing Obama Trade Deals Filled With Former Trade Lobbyists appeared first on The Intercept. http://goo.gl/CYZ7Go

Agency Overseeing Obama Trade Deals Filled With Former Trade Lobbyists

(This is an item from our new blog: Unofficial Sources.)

The Office of the United States Trade Representative, the agency responsible for negotiating two massive upcoming trade deals, is being led by former lobbyists for corporations that stand to benefit from the deals, according to disclosure forms obtained by The Intercept.

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is a proposed free trade accord between the U.S. and 11 Pacific Rim countries; the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) is a similar agreement between the U.S. and the E.U.

The Obama administration is pushing hard to complete both deals, which it says will increase U.S. trade opportunities. Critics say the deals will provide corporate interests with sweeping powers to challenge banking and environmental regulations.

Here is information on three major figures in the Trade Representative’s office, gleaned from their disclosure forms:

— Sharon Bomer Lauritsen, the assistant U.S. trade representative for agricultural affairs, recently lobbied for the Biotechnology Industry Organization, a trade group for biotech companies. Lauritsen’s financial disclosure form shows she made $320,193 working to influence “state, federal and international governments” on biotech patent and intellectual property issues. She worked for BIO as an executive vice president through April of 2011, before joining the Trade Representative office.

— Christopher Wilson, the deputy chief of mission to the World Trade Organization, recently worked for C&M International, a trade consulting group, where he represented Chevron, the Biotechnology Industry Organization, British American Tobacco, General Electric, Apple and other corporate interests. Wilson’s financial disclosure shows he made $250,000 a year, in addition to an $80,000 bonus in 2013, before he joined the Obama administration. Wilson left C&M International in February of 2014 and later joined the Trade Representative’s office. C&M International reportedly lobbied Malaysia, urging it to oppose tobacco regulations in Australia.

— Robert Holleyman, the deputy United States trade representative, previously worked as the president of the Business Software Alliance, a lobbying group that represents IBM, Microsoft, Adobe, Apple and other technology companies seeking to strengthen copyright law. Holleyman earned $1,141,228 at BSA before his appointment. Holleyman was nominated for his current position in February of last year.

These disclosures about the revolving door at the trade agency come after U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman received scrutiny over a special bonus paid to him in 2009 after he left Citigroup to join the Obama administration as deputy assistant to the president. Froman received more than $7.4 million from Citi in the year prior to joining the administration.

Critics note that under the TPP, corporations will be empowered to file lawsuits against governments to block laws that could impair future profits. The lawsuits would fall under special tribunals set up by the World Bank.

Many of the former clients of the trade officials now negotiating these agreements stand to gain immensely.

Sharon Bomer Lauritsen and Christopher Wilson both represented biotech companies. As economist Joseph Stiglitz has argued, the TPP could restrict competition in the pharmaceutical industry by undermining government regulation of drug prices and by creating new rules to obstruct the introduction of generic drugs.

Robert Holleyman represented software companies. According to the Electronic Frontier Foundation, the TPP “contains DRM [Digital Rights Management] anti-circumvention provisions that will make it a crime to tinker with, hack, re-sell, preserve, and otherwise control any number of digital files and devices that you own.”

The contents of the trade deals are secret and therefore still veiled from scrutiny by the public and even most members of Congress. Only trade officials and select corporate representatives have been able to review them.

Despite growing opposition to both deals, Finance Committee Chair Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, may introduce legislation this week to provide President Obama with “fast track” authority to limit congressional review over and expedite approval of the agreements.

Photo of United States Trade Representative Michael Froman. (Alex Wong/Getty)

The post Agency Overseeing Obama Trade Deals Filled With Former Trade Lobbyists appeared first on The Intercept. http://goo.gl/LSEbjZ