Field work
Hamilton - Lauraville area, Baltimore, Maryland
circa 1910
Possibly by August Siefert
4x5 inch glass negative
Baltimore City Life Museum Collection
Maryland Historical Society
MC7561

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EXPLORING BALTIMORE: Today, Hamilton-Lauraville is in the midst of revitalization.

A drive down Harford Road today isn’t quite what it was in 1944, when “stores, schools, theaters, churches, office buildings, laundries, bowling alleys, hamburger stands and night clubs” dotted the street.

But commerce has kicked in again, making the area one of Baltimore’s fastest-growing neighborhoods.

Thank you to Christine Muldowney with the Northeast Baltimore History Roundtable for sharing a few fun photographs from this Sunday’s celebration at Immanuel Lutheran Cemetery. Learn more about the Northeast Baltimore History Roundtable or get involved with another historic cemetery by volunteering at St. Vincent’s Cemetery Fall Clean-Up Day.

Photos: Immanuel Lutheran Cemetery Open House #bmorehistoric Thank you to Christine Muldowney with the Northeast Baltimore History Roundtable for sharing a few fun photographs from this Sunday’s celebration at 
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Street scene (showing Lauraville Volunteer Fire Company firehouse)
Lauraville, Baltimore
1913
Unidentified photographer
August Siefert Photograph Collection
Baltimore City Life Museum Collection
Maryland Historical Society
MC7508 

Full image and detail. Click to enlarge. 

The Hamilton/Lauraville neighborhood of Baltimore was mostly farmland throughout most of the 19th century. Lauraville’s population was recorded at 500 in 1882 and about 42% of the population were farmers. Lauraville began to suburbanize by 1900, which climbed exponentially after World War I. 


Holcomb, E. (2005). The City as Suburb: A History of Northeast Baltimore since 1660. University of Virginia Press. 

Red Canoe - coffee and books in Lauraville

I’ve been reading a ton about restaurants popping up in the Hamilton/Lauraville neighborhoods, but I had no idea where they were. So this morning, after referencing the September issue of Baltimore magazine, I jotted down directions to Clementine, and we hit the road seeking breakfast.

Long story short, I got distracted from my end goal when I saw Chameleon Cafe (another new restaurant I’ve heard tons about), so I parked and got out, only to find that they’re closed on Sundays. Whoops. Fortunately, a bookstore and coffee shop called Red Canoe was next door and looked inviting.

Great find! The interior is super cozy, just like you’d imagine a bookstore and cafe to be. We decided to stay once we saw they had 1) breakfast burritos and 2) outdoor seating on a back deck. We pretty much had the back yard to ourselves, and we were happy to enjoy our accidental find. I would highly recommend the breakfast burrito with basil pesto. It gave a new flavor to a regular menu item.

I never did find Clementine, or Hamilton Tavern for that matter. But Red Canoe is worth a try. As we ordered, I could hear kids upstairs rehearsing music, and later a little ballerina came in for classes. Someone’s making good use of all the floors of this rowhome.

Old Hamilton Library listed on the National Register of Historic Places

On September 25, the Old Hamilton Library was listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Designed by Baltimore architect Theodore W. Pietsch, the historic branch library was built thanks to the organized efforts of the Woman’s Club of Hamilton and the Hamilton Improvement Association along with support from Pittsburgh industrialist Andrew Carnegie.

Baltimore Heritage submitted…

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Pastel de m&m en Familia! :) @jesuss21 @lauravill

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