Mystery Deepens Over Rare Roman Tombstone

Mystery has deepened over a Roman tombstone unearthed earlier this year in western England, as new research revealed it had no link with the skeleton laying beneath it.

The inscribed stone was discovered during the construction work of a parking lot in Cirencester. Made from Cotswold limestone, it was found laying on its front in a grave — directly above an adult skeleton.

When it was turned over, the honey colored stone revealed fine decorations and five lines of Latin inscription which read: “D.M. BODICACIA CONIUNX VIXIT ANNO S XXVII,” possibly meaning: “To the shades of the underworld, Bodicacia, spouse, lived 27 years.”

The discovery was hailed as unique since the stone was believed to be the only tombstone from Roman Britain to record the person found beneath.

In fact, while the dedication on the tombstone is to a woman, the skeleton beneath it was that of a male. Read more.

Praise for an Ideal Roman Matron

Ausonius (310-395 CE), Parentalia 2 “Aemilia Aeonia Mater”

Next I turn to you, Aeonia my mother,
Of mixed blood- your mother came from Tarbellae,
And your father was one of the Aedui.
You possessed every virtue that befits a dutiful wife-
Renown for chastity, hands that worked wool,
Faithfulness to your marriage vows
And careful attention to rearing your children;
Friendly gravity, too, and happy seriousness.
Now that you have eternally embraced
Your husband’s placid shade,
Just as you once warmed his bed in life,
So also warm his tomb in death.

Proxima tu, genetrix Aeonia, sanguine mixto
  Tarbellae matris patris et Haeduici.
morigerae uxoris virtus cui contigit omnis,
  fama pudicitiae lanificaeque manus
coniugiique fides et natos cura regendi
  et gravitas comis laetaque serietas.
aeternum placidos manes complexa mariti,
  viva torum quondam, functa fove tumulum.

A Mother with Her Sleeping Child, Léon Bazille Perrault (1832-1908)

Cicero sends greetings to Atticus.
By Hercules, your letter was most welcome to my Tullia and to me- your letters always bring some ray of hope. So, please write and, if you can summon up some hope, don’t let it go. Don’t fear Antony’s lions. There’s no one more congenial than that man. Take a good look at that politician’s play. He called out the ten leading men and the four-man courts from the municipalities by letter. They came to his villa in the morning. First, he slept until nine. Then, when it had been reported that they had come from Naples and Cumae (for Caesar was angry with them), he ordered them to come back the next day, because he wanted to bathe and take a laxative. He did this yesterday. But today he has decided to cross into Aenaria to promise return to the exiles.
But let us pass over these things and talk about our own affairs. I received a letter from Axius. Thank you, regarding Tiro. I like Vettienus, and I’ve paid back Vestorius. Servius is said to have stayed at Menturnae on May 6th- today he’ll stay with C. Marcellus at Literninum. So, he will see me early tomorrow and give me a topic for a letter to you. For now, I’m coming up with nothing to write about.
— 

Cicero, Epistulae ad Atticum X.XIII.1-2

i was just gonna translate the first couple sentences for the atticus feelings, but then the whole part about antony was too funny to pass up

Latin Word Formation: mellivorus

mellivorus, -a, -um - “honey-eating”

  • vorō, vorāre ” - to devour + “-us, -a, -um ” - adjectival suffix
  • – > [ vorā- ] + [ o- ] – stems
  • – > [ vor- ] + [ o- ] – ending ā in [ vorā- ] disappears before [ o- ]
  • – > [ voro- ] – new stem implying “devouring”
  • – > [ mell- ] + [ voro- ] – with stem of “mel ” - honey
  • – > [ mell- ] + connecting vowel i + [ voro- ]
  • – > [ mellivoro- ] – new stem implying “honey-devouring”
  • = “mellivorus, mellivora, mellivorum ” – first-/second-declension adjective
Nova Iuncta Verba Latina / New Latin Compounds

ἡ Οὐτιδανoάνασσα -ης / Utidanoanassa -ae f. “Commander of Trash” (thoodleoo/Sarah)
  [οὐτιδανοῖσιν ἀνάσσεις (Iliad, 1.231) “you are a commander of trash” (literally, “you are lord of good-for-nothings”)]
  [οὐτιδανός “good-for-nothing” + ἄνασσα “queen” (feminine noun associated with ἀνάσσειν)]
  [οὐτιδανο- + (ϝ)ἀνασσα-] stems
  [οὐτιδανο- + (ϝ)ἀνασσα-] with Connecting Vowel ο
  [Οὐτιδανοανασσα-] new stem
  [Οὐτιδανοάνασσα] nominative singular (cf. ὑμνοάνασσα)
  [Utidanoanassa] Οὐτιδανοάνασσα Latinized

This is Vesuvius, just now green with viney shadows;
Here the noble grape had pressed the dripping vats.
These are the mountains which Bacchus loved more than Nyssa’s hills;
On this mountain satyrs recently danced;
This was the seat of Venus, more dear to her than Sparta;
This was the place famous with a Herculean name.
All lies buried in flames and ash:
Not even the gods would have wanted to be allowed to do this.
—  Martial, Epigrams IV.LXIV

Grimer - Muk

Generic Epithet: Disoteras (“slime-monster”)

  • δεῖσα, δείσης ” - slime, filth + “τέρας, τέρατος ” - monster
  • – > [ δεισᾱ- ] + [ τερατ- ] – stems
  • – > [ δεισᾱ- ] + connecting vowel ο + [ τερατ- ]
  • – > [ δεισ- ] + connecting vowel ο + [ τερατ- ] – ending  in [ δεισᾱ- ] disappears before connecting vowel ο
  • – > [ δεισοτερατ- ] – new stem implying “slime-monster”
  • – > [ dīsoterat- ] – Latinized stem
  • = “dīsoteras, dīsoteratis ” – third-declension neuter

Specific Epithets:

Grimer: Disoteras minus (“lesser slime-monster”)

Muk: Disoteras maius (“greater slime-monster”)

Gastly - Haunter - Gengar

Generic Epithet: Atmidolum (“gas-phantom”)

  • ἀτμός, ἀτμοῦ ” - steam, vapor (now used to refer to gas) + “εἴδωλον, εἰδώλου ” - phantom
  • – > [ ἀτμο- ] + [ εἰδωλο- ] – stems
  • – > [ ἀτμ- ] + [ εἰδωλο- ] – ending ο in [ ἀτμο- ] disappears before starting εἰ in [ εἰδωλο- ]
  • – > [ ἀτμειδωλο-] – new stem implying “gas-phantom”
  • – > [ atmīdōlo- ] – Latinized stem
  • = “atmīdōlum, atmīdōlī ” – second-declension neuter

Specific Epithets:

Gastly: Atmidolum caliginosum (“cloudy/gloomy gas-phantom”)

Haunter: Atmidolum larvale (“ghostly gas-phantom”)

Gengar: Atmidolum umbraticola (“shadow-dweller gas-phantom”)

  • Umbraticola is common gender.

Tyda is an amazing Swedish dictionary that allows you to look up words in English, French, German, Spanish, Latin (!?!?!?!!) and Norwegian. It’s a two way dictionary, so you can look up Swedish words, and get definitions in all those languages, or you can look up a German or Spanish word for example, and get the Swedish definition. 

Go nuts! :D

New Latin Neologisms: cancrambulus + cancrambulāre

cancrambulus, -a, -um - “crab-walking”

  • ambulō, ambulāre ” - to walk + “-us, -a, -um ” - adjectival suffix
  • – > [ ambulā- ] + [ o- ] – stems
  • – > [ ambul- ] + [ o- ] – ending ā in [ ambulā- ] disappears before [ o- ]
  • – > [ ambulo- ] – new stem implying “walking”
  • – > [ cancro- ] + [ ambulo- ] – with stem of “cancer ” - crab
  • – > [ cancr- ] + [ ambulo- ] – ending o in [ cancro- ] disappears before starting a in [ ambulo- ]
  • – > [ cancrambulo- ] – new stem implying “crab-walking”
  • = “cancrambulus, cancrambula, cancrambulum ” – first-/second-declension adjective

cancrambulāre, -ō, -āvī, -ātus - “to crab-walk”

  • cancrambulus, cancrambula, cancrambulum ” - crab-walking + “-ō, -āre, -āvī, -ātus ” - first-declension verb endings
  • – > [ cancrambulo- ] + [ ā- ] – stems
  • – > [ cancrambul- ] + [ ā- ] – ending o in [ cancrambulo- ] disappears before [ ā- ]
  • – > [ cancrambulā- ] – new stem implying “to be crab-walking”
  • = “cancrambulō, cancrambulāre ” – first-declension denominative verb

anonymous asked:

I would love a pen pal to write with in Latin. Do you have any idea where I could look?

That sounds like an interesting idea, though I don’t know where you could figure something like that out…

thoodleoo, you’re the queen of the Latin fandom, what do you think?

Latin Word Formation: melitophilus + melitophilia

melitophilus, -a, -um - “loving honey”

  • φιλεῖν ” - to love + “-ος ” - adjectival suffix
  • — > [ φιλε- ] + [ ο- ] — stems
  • — > [ φιλ- ] + [ ο- ] — ending ε in [ φιλε- ] disappears before [ ο- ]
  • — > [ φιλο- ] — new stem implying “loving”
  • — > [ μελιτ- ] + [ φιλο- ] — with stem of “μέλι ” - honey
  • — > [ μελιτ- ] + connecting vowel ο + [ φιλο- ]
  • — > [ μελιτοφιλο- ] — new stem implying “honey-loving”
  • — > [ melitophilo- ] — Latinized stem
  • = “melitophilus, melitophila, melitophilum ” - first- and second-declension adjective

melitophilia, -iae - (f.) “love of honey”

  • [ μελιτοφιλο- ] + [ ιᾱ- ] — with stem of suffix of abstract nouns, ία
  • — > [ μελιτοφιλ- ] + [ ιᾱ- ] — ending ο in [ μελιτοφιλο- ] disappears before starting ι in [ ιᾱ- ]
  • — > [ μελιτοφιλιᾱ- ] — new stem implying “the state of loving honey”
  • — > [ melitophiliā- ] — Latinized stem
  • = “melitophilia, melitophiliae ” - first-declension feminine