lambeosaurus

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Herbivorous Dinosaurs from Alberta. By Julius Csotonyi

“About 75 million years ago, shows niche partitioning at work. It is likely that dietary differences between each species allowed the habitat to support such a diverse population of herbivores.” Read more at Species New to Science

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Ornithopods at the AMNH
Other herbivore dinosaurs at the AMNH
Armored Herbivores - Ceratopsians - Some Sauropods - Psittacosaurus
Photos by me

Ornitópodos en el AMNH
Otros dinosaurios herbívoros en el AMNH
Acorazados - Ceratópsidos - Algunos Saurópodos - Psittacosaurus
Fotos mías

LAMBEOSAURUS
“Lambe’s lizard”
Late Cretaceous, 76-75 million years ago

Lambeosaurus was a duck-billed hadrosaur with a decorative, hatchet-shaped crest. As with other hadrosaurs like Parasaurolophus and Corythosaurus, scientists believe that the specialized crests served various social functions: noisemaking, sexual display, etc. Older hadrosaur specimens, however, automatically assumed the crests were gang symbols.

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A mounted Lambeosaurus at the Royal Ontario Museum.  Lambeosaurus is a type of hadrosaurid dinosaur that lived during the Late Cretaceous period (~75 million years ago) in North America.  This bipedal/quadrupedal, plant-eating dinosaur is known for its distinctive hollow cranial crest, which in the best-known species resembled a hatchet.  The most widely excepted theory about it’s hollow crest is that is aided in social noise making, amplifying sounds.

Lambeosaurus & The Number One Naming Taboo

Lambeosaurus was named by William Parks (a famous Canadian scientist who has his own dinosaur named after him, Parksosaurus) after Lawrence Lambe, the man who originally discovered the dinosaur.

The rule of thumb in palaeontology is you can name a dinosaur after just about anything you want, except yourself. Someone else has to do that for you!

Written by @kironcmukherjee. Last update: April 14th, 2014.

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http://wormsandbones.com

WIP of an original commission we’ve been working on for some time now. Love working on the prehistorics, but the level of research, planning and edits is strictly speaking, killer. Hoping to have this guy ready for final photos by next week, but we’ll see how that goes.

If we blast through our schedule this week, we may have a new commission opening in early march. Will post more about that if we can swing it.