4

Was Jack amused? Of course not! Yeah, there was snow. Yeah, it was everywhere. Yeah, it was JULY. But was he the one who made it happen? No, and that just wasn’t on! If anyone was going to create a summer snowstorm, it was him, Jack Frost, the god damn spirit of winter! He was the only one with the RIGHT to make snow happen.

So, he had to go and find out exactly who was behind this little snowstorm. He’d give them a piece of his mind, make them realise just whose job they were messing with on this one, and the snow would be gone just like that. Everything back to normal! Simple!

Of course it didn’t turn out like that, sure, but then how was he to know that the cause of the problem was the new queen of Arendelle? Nobody had dropped him the memo on that one. And once he knew she had ice powers, what was he supposed to do? Walk away? Never!

He had to help her, and that was when things really started to spiral out of control…

8

One of my favourite aspects of Pacific Rim is the importance placed upon collaboration. Being a good Jaeger pilot isn’t about being the smartest or the strongest, it’s about being able to understand and cooperate with others. The world can’t be saved by one man, but if people are willing to put aside their differences and work together then there is hope. 

10

When watching this scene I can’t help by draw similarities between Elsa losing control of her powers and myself (as a person with Asperger’s Syndrome) having a meltdown.

At the start of the scene Elsa is clearly very anxious. She keeps moving away from Anna whenever she draws near, trying to look cheerful and sound normal but obviously struggling to remain calm and keep her emotions under wraps. Anna is oblivious to this, continuing to move closer to Elsa while trying to convince her not to hide away.

Then Anna says something that triggers Elsa. The façade of normality drops, and the snowflakes start to fall around her. Anna tries to tell her that it’s okay, but Elsa is becoming more and more stressed, clenching her hands and tensing up as the snowflakes swirl around her with intensity. She’s moving away from Anna, running her fingers through her hair in agitation. She tells her sister to go away, that she’s just making things worse, but Anna is oblivious and continues to move closer.

Elsa’s fists are clenched, her head bent, completely lost in her emotions and her powers beyond control. In the crescendo she releases a blast of ice which hurts the nearby Anna. Elsa doesn’t realise what’s happening at that moment, still too caught up in the stress and fear, but after calming down she quickly becomes horrified by what has happened. 

Obviously meltdowns are different from person to person (and I don’t freeze people’s hearts by mistake), but it’s interesting how similar this scene is to my own experiences. Though it’s unintentional, I think this scene could actually be a useful learning tool: In the future, when someone asks what having a meltdown is actually like, I’ll show them this. Maybe it will help them understand a little better.

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