kristang

Alice the School Prefect.She is Eurasian Portuguese,also known as Kristang.She born in Malacca #alice #pinaforegirls #vest #smksb #schoolprefect #malaysianschool #malaysia #portuguese #malacca #kristang #animefan #animelife #anime #animecute #anime_girl #animeart #animegirl #mangadraw #mangaart #manga #mangadrawing #mangagirl #mangalife #cute #moe #kawaiiness #kawaii #mature #animebeauty #pixiv

New Post has been published on The Rakyat Post

New Post has been published on http://www.therakyatpost.com/life/foodie/2014/11/12/kristang-family-cookbook/

A Kristang Family Cookbook

ONE of chef Melba Nunis’ fondest childhood memories is cleaning croaker fish (ikan gulama) at her grandmother Mama Rosa’s kitchen sink, where she enjoyed a picturesque view of her grandfather Papa Vincent’s garden.

“She would painstakingly wash the fish over and over again under the running tap water to get them clean, and I remember asking her why she didn’t’ just wash the fish with soap to make it cleaner. This would make her laugh while I was happy just to be able to spend time with her.”

Mel remembers mangoes being readily available for cooking from Papa Vincent’s (Vincent Arthur Sta Maria) garden and Mama Rosa (Rosalind Adelaide Fernandez) cooking them with fish curry often because the fruits had to be used up.

Putting the cookbook together was a family effort, says Melba Nunis who owns a restaurant, Simply Mel’s specialising in the food that she had grown up with. — TRP pic by Daniel Chan

“My grandfather frequently brought back croaker fish whenever he went fishing and that’s how the recipe for Mango Singgang curry came about,” shares the genial chef of Simply Mel’s, a family-run restaurant offering homemade Kristang ( Malacca Portuguese-Eurasian cuisine) at The Sphere, Bangsar South, Kuala Lumpur.

Rightly so, this treasured recipe is just one of many special family recipes that is preserved in the 60-year-old chef and homemaker’s new cookbook, A Kristang Family Cookbook published by Marshall Cavendish.

Mel credits her gift in cooking and entertaining to Mama Rosa and her mother Mama Mercy (Mercedes Sta Maria) who both loved entertaining, generously sharing their cooking knowledge and recipes with friends and fellow cooking enthusiasts.

Original recipes feature in Melba Nunis’ cookbook alongside Kristang favourites. — TRP pic by Danile Chan

Her interest in cooking and entertaining developed after observing and assisting her grandmother and mother in the kitchen, when they prepared meals for their families and friends.

It grew further when Mel herself became a wife, mother and homemaker for 41 years, cooking these recipes that she learnt from both women.

Three and a half years ago she opened her own restaurant, Simply Mel’s specialising in the food that she had grown up with.

Original recipes from the two women, like Mama Rosa’s stew and Mama Mercy’s crab stuffing ­— a specialty at Mel’s restaurant — also feature in Mel’s cookbook alongside Kristang favourites as prepared and enjoyed by her family over four generations.

Mama Rosa’s fish and mango curry (Mango Singgang Curry) is still enjoyed today. — Pic courtesy of Melba Nunis

Putting the cookbook together was a family effort, she says, with the forward written by her husband Victor, while daughters Cheryl, Alison and Stacey Jane took charge of managing the cookbook project, layout of the book and tasting its recipes for consistency.

It took six months to put the collection of 86 recipes together.

“Deciding what to put into the book and narrowing the choices down was a challenge because my mother had collected so many recipes. I am now well-equipped and eager to embark on my second cook book. However, in this first book, I wanted to put down traditional Kristang favourites that I am already cooking at my cafe.

“The very essence of my restaurant is showcasing home­-cooked Portuguese Eurasian food. It serves food my way, and includes family recipes that I wanted to preserve and am willing to share with people. I am blessed and lucky that I have my family’s total support.”

The exotic keluak nut is highlighted in Keluak Curry. — Pic courtesy of Melba Nunis.

One of the unusual Portuguese delicacies she is proud of and has managed to introduce to so many people at her cafe is the keluak nut. “Some like it, some don’t. It’s an acquired taste. ”

Mel has devoted a chapter to the nut and in addition to recipes for keluak curry and keluak salad, she has included her own recipe for keluak fried rice.

There’s also a chapter devoted to traditional Kristang fare enjoyed at Christmas like Feng, Devil Curry , Seybah , Sugee Cake, Fruit Cake and the piece de resistance, Mama Mercy’s Roast Chicken with Baked Bean Stuffing.

“All these dishes may be traditional Kristang yuletide favourites, however, no two families cook them the same way. Every family has their own recipes, and these are mine. They are dishes which I ate and enjoyed as a little girl. With this cookbook I want people to know that they are holding my family legacy in their hands.”

A Kristang Family Cookbook is priced at RM89 and is available at Simply Mel’s, Unit 1­1A, 1st Floor, The Sphere, No 1 Avenue 1, Bangsar South. No 8 Jalan Kerinchi, 59200

The recipe below is from A Kristang Family Cookbook, reproduced with permission from Melba Nunis.

Mango Singgang Curry

Serves 4 to 5

2 tbsps cooking oil

450g basic sambal rempah (recipe below)

1.25 litres water

6 young mangoes, peeled and cut into quarters

4 tbsps tamarind/Assam juice (made by mixing 1 tsp tamarind pulp in 4tbsps water and strained)

1 tbsp salt

1 tbsp sugar

500g fish steaks ( croaker/ikan gulama, threadfin/kurau or Spanish mackerel )

2 – 3 kafir lime leaves

1 tomato, cut into quarters

2 red chilies, cut into half with seeds removed

Method

1. Heat the oil in a pot over medium heat. Add the basic sambal rempah and stir fry for 2 minutes.

2. Add the water, mangoes, tamarind juice, salt and sugar and bring to the boil. Boil for 5 minutes, then add the fish steaks and lime leaves. Cook for a further 5 minutes.

3. Add tomato and chilies and cook until fish is done. Dish out and serve immediately.

Basic Rempah Paste

( makes about 600g)

50 g dried chilies, cut into short lengths and soaked to soften

500g shallots, peeled

40g candlenuts

125 ml water

375ml cooking oil

Method

1. Drain the dried red chilies and place in a food processor with the shallots and candlenuts. Add water and blend well.

2. Heat the oil in a frying pan. Add the paste and cook over low heat for 10 minutes or until cooked and fragrant.

3. Remove from heat and drain excess oil.

4. Use immediately. Rempah can be kept refrigerated for up to two days and if frozen, indefinitely.

Tumblr Challenges, wee!

Ok ok so I was tagged on two of those super cute and friendly challenges and only NOW i saw the notifications so I’m really sorry about not saying anything about them until now, I swear I wasn’t ignoring you guys or anything like that! 

I was tagged by darcythekuemperor to do the music one and by hockeyapuckalypse to do the wallpaper screenshot one, they’re both under the “Read More” thingy because this post is already long enough. Nway, here are the challenges and thank you Cat and Sara SO MUCH for tagging me, I love you guys!

Read More

For a moment there i thought i was not living in the city. #minimal #cameraapp #evening #clouds #sky #blue #scenery #tree #silhoutte #photo #photography #photogram #instagood #instalike #instagram #instagrammalaysia #weather #webstagram #webstapick #train #iphone4s #iphonegram #kristang