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U-Ram Choe's Latest Kinetic Light Sculptures

Born in 1970, U-Ram Choe works out of a modest studio in Seoul, South Korea where he specializes in the design and creation of kinetic sculptures. He views his works as living organisms, bestowing them with a system of scientific nomenclature, often accompanied by mythological descriptions of each “species” behaviors, life cycle, and place in the wider ecosystem.

1.2.3.4.Una Lumino (2012) – metal, polycarbonate, motor, CPU board, and LED. 55cm h x 710cm w x 670cm d. According to U-Ram, Una Lumino is a species of mechanized sentient creatures, similar to sea barnacles in form and movement. They exhibit sophisticated behavioral patterns, communicating with each other in colonies as they form giant masses of pulsing, breathing light.

5.6. Cakra Lamp (2013) – metal, machinery, and electronic CPU board, motor and LED. 55cm diameter. While most of Choe’s creations relate to flora and fauna, Cakra is the second in a series of pieces that draws inspiration from Buddhist mandalas. Photos via Artitute Art.

7.8.9.10. Insecta Lamps (2013) – metal, machinery, magnet, electronic CPU board, motor and LED. 15cm w x 15cm d x 36cm h. Now this is sculptural lighting!


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Tele-Present Water Simulates a Spot in the Pacific from Halfway Around the World

Artist David Bowen is known for his kinetic sculptures that are driven by real-world data from natural phenomenon. For his work “Tele-Present Water,” first exhibited at the National Museum in Wroclaw, Poland, Bowen pulled real-time wave intensity and frequency data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) buoy station 46246 (49°59’7″ N 145°5’20″ W) located in the remote Shumagin Islands of Alaska. This information was scaled and transferred to a mechanical grid structure, resulting in an uncanny live simulation of the movement of water from halfway around the world. The piece, along with Bowen’s other works, speaks to the way technology and telecommunications can both alienate us from and unite us with the natural world. While technology has enabled us to control and model phenomena with unprecedented precision, it may also provide a means to understand the world in a more intimate, visceral way. 

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Pe Lang

Swiss kinetic artist combines motors and simple materials to present minimalist yet complex works - here are a selection of works embedded below:

polarization | nº 1

nº 943 - 1238

nº 804

Pe Lang is a Swiss-born artist know for creating minimal kinetic artworks that control and put physical forces in action with a captivating elegance. His sculptures and installations combine hand made mechanized systems with a stringent constructive optimization in which each element can be deciphered with respect to its functionality.

More at the artist’s website here

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Breaking Wave is a kinetic sculpture designed by Plebian Design and Hypersonic for the biotechnology company Biogen-Idec’s new headquarters in Cambridge, MA.

About the project:

Breaking Wave tells the story of the search for patterns, and the surprising results that come by changing our point of view. 804 suspended spheres move in a wave-like formation. When the wave crests and breaks, the balls hover momentarily in a cloud. From almost anywhere in the room, this cloud is purely chaotic, but step into one of two hidden spots, and this apparent chaos shows a hidden pattern. From the first, a labyrinth hints at the search for knowledge, and from the second, a Fibonacci spiral inspired flower reminds us of the natural order and patterns found in nature.

Scientists search through billions of experimental data points in order to find patterns to develop new drugs, to treat Multiple Sclerosis, Cancer, and other diseases. Without a particular framework or perspective, these are just 0’s and 1’s, with no form or information. But with the perspective of an understanding of molecular dynamics, these data points create a clear picture about the hidden dynamics within the body, and allow scientists to craft drugs to successfully treat these diseases.

Above the sculpture lies the mechanism that drives its motion. A motor drives a large rotating stainless steel cam. 36 rollers follow the contour of the cam, which traces out the overall waveform. Each roller slides on a linear track, pulling a cable that spins one of the 36 output shafts. Distributed along each shaft are different sized drums from which the wooden sphere (coated in zinc and steel, and then rusted chemically) are hung. As the shafts rotate, the drums pull the balls up and down – larger drums pull balls higher. In this way, the size of the 804 drums mechanically programs the images hidden in the cloud of balls.

See it in motion in this video:

Breaking Wave from PLEBIAN DESIGN on Vimeo.