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Humans of Kabul

  1. "Why did you decide to stay in Afghanistan to go to university, when you could have studied in the U.S. on a scholarship?"
    "This is Afghanistan and I am an Afghan - I feel like not all of us should leave! I was happy to get a scholarship from an American university, but it was a dream come true when I received a full scholarship from a private Afghan university. I believe that there is so much I can learn and do if I am in Afghanistan. I can volunteer, I can pass on what I learn, I can be an activist, I can protect rights, I can vote, I can develop a business, I can make the unheard voice heard … and so much more!"
  2. "The happiest day of my life was when the Taliban left Kabul. I came out of my house and there were Afghan soldiers on the streets keeping the peace."
  3. "So what is the best part about the zoo?" 
    "I work for the Environmental Protection Agency of Afghanistan, so I want my children to have the chance to learn about the animals." 
  4. "What advice do you have for parents?"
    "I advise all parents to give their children education. Do not let them work for money when they are young."
  5. “So, can you tell me what you’re doing here?”
    “This bike riding club is to encourage girls to ride here in Kabul. There are so many girls that won’t bike because they think that the culture won’t allow for it, and so they have to walk for long distances instead. Also, there’s not a lot of sports facilities for women, so biking is a great option to exercise.”
  6. Little humans of Kabul. They love that lion statue at the Kabul Zoo …
  7. "What’s your favorite part about flying kites?
    "Fighting other kites!"
  8. "What do you want to be when you grow up?"
    "A journalist. Like my mom."
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Joey’s silky gold hair gleams in the afternoon sun. The big bundle of energy loves to cuddle. He also looks like he could lose a few pounds.

This herding dog is one of the many survival stories here at the Kabul shelter and clinic called Nowzad Dogs. The facility has rescued and treated hundreds of street animals in Afghanistan and has helped reunite hundreds of soldiers and contractors with animals they informally adopted while deployed in the country.

British Marine’s New Mission: Save All Of Kabul’s Street Animals

Photo Credit: David Gilkey/NPR

Humans of Kabul

“If you could give a message to a large group of people, what would it be?”
“Afghanistan has a lot to offer us, and we all have opportunities for personal growth here. I grew up in Afghanistan. I have learned what freedom means here, and how to live as a free human being in Afghanistan. We do not necessarily need to go to the West to open our minds to reality. Being open-minded is not limited to borders, and you can shine and be a leader anywhere, but only if you want to.”

Western Australian Museum reveals 'Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul'

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PERTH.- A stunning exhibition of treasures once thought lost to the world opened at the Western Australian Museum, Perth.

WA Museum CEO Alec Coles said the Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures from the National Museum, Kabul exhibition contained more than 200 rare and beautiful objects dating back to the Bronze Age, from a place that was once at the crossroads of the world’s great civilisations.

“Standing as it did at the heart of the ancient Silk Road, Afghanistan was the historic link between Iran, Central Asia, India, and China and became a trading place for gold, glass, ceramics and precious stones with civilisations as far away as Rome, Greece and even Egypt,” Mr Coles said.

“The objects in this exhibition span 2,000 years of exquisite craftsmanship, and the fact we even have them here at all is an incredible story in itself.” These objects were thought to have been stolen or destroyed during Afghanistan’s years of conflict, when thousands of irreplaceable antiquities were lost. But a brave group of five staff from the National Museum in Kabul hid them, risking their lives to save their cultural heritage for future generations. (source)

AFGHANISTAN, Kabul : An Afghan boy stands on a street next to dogs in Kabul on February 22, 2014. Afghanistan’s economy is recovering from decades of conflict but despite the significant improvement in the last decade it is extremely poor, and highly dependent on foreign aid. AFP PHOTO/ Nicolas ASFOURI

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