jsc*

8

"I’m alone except for Beetee, who still lies in front of me, being sustained by his army of machines. Where are the others, then? Peeta, Finnick, Enobaria, and…and…one more, right? Either Johanna or Chaff or Brutus was still alive when the bombs began. I’m sure they’ll want to make an example of us all. But where have they taken them? Moved them from hospital to prison?"

just a little heartache: Departing the Moon, photographed by Apollo 17, December 1972.

Showing the terminator on the lunar farside. The peaked crater at left is Tsiolkovskiy, again.

No date and time information attached to these images, but presumably just after escape from lunar orbit at midnight on the 16th.

Image credit: NASA/JSC/ASU. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

odyssey: Sunset over the western Pacific, photographed from Apollo 13, April 1970.

Sequence of 9 Hasselblad photographs, starting over the central Pacific. As the Earth turns, eastern Asia (top) and Australia (bottom) come in to view.

Apollo 13 was launched on the 11th April. From the geography visible and sunset times for April 1970, I estimate the sequence covers 2-2.5 hours, most likely ending around 7:30am GMT on the 12th.

At 3am on the 14th, en route to the Moon, Apollo 13’s no. 2 oxygen tank exploded. The planned lunar landing was aborted, and scientists and engineers on the ground were forced to improvise a way to get the astronauts home alive in the damaged spacecraft. 

Apollo 13 finally returned to Earth on the 17th, splashing down in the southern Pacific - just left of twilight at the start of the sequence above.

Image credit: NASA/JSC, c/o LPI. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.