It’s time for reporters, particularly freelancers, and the editors who commission them, to be honest about risk. And it’s also time for those news organizations that for financial and liability reasons want a strictly arm’s-length relationship with stringers to recognize they have a duty of care toward those they send or encourage to go to the front lines.

Women’s Magazines are several million pound industry in the UK. With over 200 titles to choose from, women buy on average almost 7 million magazines every month, and 38% of women in the UK trust magazines. And yet magazines that claim to be for women or that are supposedly sex positive are churning out article titles such as “Ten lazy ways to lose weight” or “12 Little Things Every Guy Wants in Bed”. Their cover images are sexualised, their articles are derogatory and weight-obsessed, and their fashion editorials are so photoshopped that even the real life models no longer look like that. They evoke unneeded competition between women. And it isn’t just about body image, the models used, or size zero clothing. It’s about the stories and article written, the way celebrities are scrutinized, and what questions female actors and musicians are asked in their interviews. While there’s nothing wrong with wanting to be beautiful, desirable, sexy, or trendy, what is problematic is the obsession with these things about all else, to the point where being beautiful is seen as life’s greatest achievement and all else pales in comparison.

So we’ve decided to make a difference, in the form of a new magazine: Parallel. The title is a play on the idea that feminism and modern popular culture are currently running parallel to one another. In order to get feminism into the minds of the mainstream youth, the two things need to intersect and combine. And that’s exactly what we plan to do. Our magazine will cover subjects regarding race, gender, sexuality, age, liberation, women’s rights, activism, disability, and more, all tied up together in an aesthetically pleasing, contemporary women’s magazine. We will subvert the format of ordinary celebrity or fashion magazines to highlight key issues in today’s world. We will interview and talk to influential women about their opinions, highlight key feminist community groups that you could get involved in, and will review, discuss, and critique women’s role in the media.

Parallel Magazine will discuss achievements outside of fashion and beauty, will talk about community and activism and how you, as a woman, can make a change to the world around you. It will focus on everything from art to pop culture to history – all through the viewpoint of a modern young feminist. But we need your help.

We’ve set up a Kickstarter to cover the following costs:

  • printing costs (for the first - and future - issues)
  • trademarking the name
  • making a website
  • travel expenses for interviews and photoshoots
  • business cards
  • the launch party

In order to get the magazine published, we need a readership, and that starts with you. The first issue is due to be released in January 2015, so effectively your donations will be acting as pre-orders for the magazine. You can either pre-order one issue, or buy a year’s subscription. Each option comes with the choice of no goodie bag, a small goodie bag, or a large goodie bag.

SUPPORT PARALLEL MAGAZINE ON KICKSTARTER!

ISIS

ISIS, you are a disgrace to Islam and the followers of that religion. And I hope you know how much hate America has for you. Murdering innocent journalists, using them as pawns in your disgusting political wars, is unfathomable. My heart breaks for the families of the journalists who have fallen under ISIS’s knife, amongst all the child soldiers ISIS has captured and turned into killing machines, the women who have been beaten and raped, the families torn apart by this monstrosity of declaration of “Islam.” This is not Islam. You do not pray to the same Allah. Have you forgotten your pillars?
America will fight you unto the gates of hell because that ISIS is were you belong.
And if I might add- from a current journalist and future international war journalist - you will never silence me. You won’t ever deter me away from giving people who fear they have no chance a voice. You can take you false humanity and shove it up your ass. There have been very few war lords brought to my attention - that I have hated with this much intensity- but ISIS America will lose no sleep once you have been taken off this world. I pray for the families and victims and I pray for your sad misguided souls.

-A young woman who actually gives a shit about the peace and quality of the world.

Photographing Crime Scenes in Chicago on One of the Most Violent Weekends of the Year

It’s 1:30 AM on the morning of July 5, and we’re flying down the expressway at 90 miles an hour. Someone has just been shot near West 63rd Street and South Austin Avenue—we know this from the Twitter accounts operated by police-scanner geeks and our own $50 RadioShack scanner, set to one of the many dispatch channels operated by the Chicago Police Department. All evening the device has been crackling with a constant stream of out-of-breath cops spitting out the addresses and conditions of victims. This is just our latest target in the middle of a long night.

Sitting in the driver’s seat is Alex Wroblewski, a 27-year-old Chicago Sun-Times contract photographer who spends his summer weekends chasing the voices that burst through his scanner’s cheap speaker, trying to get to the scenes before anyone else in order to capture the rawest images. With him is Sun-Times staff reporter Sam Charles, who’s on hand to pull quotes out of whatever cops and victims he runs into. In the 12 hours I’ll spend with Alex on this Independence Day weekend, we’ll travel to a dozen of these scenes, a fraction of the total carnage that will take place in the city. From Thursday night to Monday morning, 82 Chicagoans will have been shot and 14 killed, including five people—two of them boys under the age of 17—gunned down by police for making threats or refusing to drop their handguns. It’s an especially bad stretch of time for a city some have dubbed “Chiraq,” a nickname that causes Alex and Sam to groan.

“The term ‘Chiraq’ is a fucked-up point of pride for too many people in the city,” Sam says. “It’s disrespectful to our city as a whole and to the people of Iraq. Too many out-of-town stupid media outlets—VICE included, frankly—have parroted the term to give it undeserved credibility and staying power.”

Continue

One thing that’s always rubbed me the wrong way about the sports media is how blissfully ignorant sports writers/journalists are of Black culture. In a vacuum this isn’t a problem because if they’re only writing about sports then Black culture doesn’t matter. But when it comes to things off the field/court when things like culture start to matter, the writers have such a lack of understanding that it always creates issues. 

They’re leagues of Black men in their 20s and the people writing about them are 40 year old white guys for the most part and there’s a disconnect which affects their ability to cover the story fairly and thoroughly. 

We can go back to Iverson dropping 40 bars, or new shit like the AP story. When that AP story first broke this weekend I saw a zillion journalists like “WTF is a switch???”

Even David Aldridge noticed.

image

Or the Tennessee Titans writer who talked about the troublesome song “Fight Night Remix” that had lyrics mentioning “Beating the pussy up”. The writer said it was insensitive to play this song because of the domestic violence cases going on, completely missing the fact that beating the pussy up has nothing to do with violence. 

image

I mean those are just examples of shit going on right now. But its usually an ongoing thing all year long. 

I think there’s a lot of context missing from a media coverage standpoint. Because if you don’t have a fundamental understanding of the subjects you’re writing about, you will never be able to accurately present stories from their point of view. This creates a lot of skewed narratives.

There are only so many Bomani Jones’ out there to fill the gaps. 

Last year former Daily Star’s journalist Richard Peppiatt gave a guest lecture at my uni. Short story: he admitted that many stories he wrote were completely made up. (Which, incidentally, concerns many publications. Most publications. Not the Daily Star only.)

From his resignation letter:

'Michael Jackson to attend Jade Goody's funeral'. (He didn't.) 'Robbie pops 'pill at heroes concert'. (He didn't either.) 'Matt Lucas on suicide watch'. (He wasn't.) 'Jordan turns to Buddha.' (She might have, but I doubt it.)

But how come he didn’t get into trouble? He didn’t, he said, because those stories did no harm. Yeah, they were made-up, but they weren’t just enough to get sued for. 

Truth is, and this is me talking, not Peppiatt, “any publicity is good publicity”. Plus, speech marks (‘“1D are scumbags,” says Louis Tomlinson’) are beautiful little things that sometimes are nothing but a pass to avoid a case of defamation and a lawsuit.

Also, a few of the first things my professors told our Journalism class are:

  • If a news story reports an “anonymous source,” is 99% made up.
  • Celebrity gossip stories are mostly agreed and planned between their PR and the newspaper/magazine.
  • To ask yourself, “Why are they reporting this, and why now? What’s the reason behind this news story? Cui bono? Who benefits?

Im Westen nichts Neues, but it’s always time for a good reminder.

Parallel is going to be a new women’s magazine that focuses on life through a feminist lens. Aimed at late teenage to young adult women, Parallel hopes to be a magazine that can introduce young women to the concept of feminism through the use of informative articles, which will work alongside references to modern pop culture i.e. music, films, fashion, and art.It will hope to subvert the format of modern celebrity-centric and fashion-oriented magazines in order to discuss relevant issues in modern society.

Parallel will be liberating, and empowering. It will talk about activism and achievements. It will feature strong women who are really making a difference in this world. It will be intersectional in its content, discussing race, gender, sexuality, and disability. The key aim of Parallel is to initiate feminist discussion within mainstream society.

Why are we making it?

Women’s Magazines are several million pound industry in the UK. With over 200 titles to choose from, women buy on average almost 7 million magazines every month, and 38% of women in the UK trust magazines. And yet magazines that claim to be for women or that are supposedly sex positive are churning out article titles such as “Ten lazy ways to lose weight” or “12 Little Things Every Guy Wants in Bed”. Their cover images are sexualised, their articles are derogatory and weight-obsessed, and their fashion editorials are so photoshopped that even the real life models no longer look like that. They evoke unneeded competition between women. And it isn’t just about body image, the models used, or size zero clothing. It’s about the stories and article written, the way celebrities are scrutinized, and what questions female actors and musicians are asked in their interviews. While there’s nothing wrong with wanting to be beautiful, desirable, sexy, or trendy, what is problematic is the obsession with these things about all else, to the point where being beautiful is seen as life’s greatest achievement and all else pales in comparison.

So we’ve decided to make a difference, in the form of a new magazine: Parallel. The title is a play on the idea that feminism and modern popular culture are currently running parallel to one another. In order to get feminism into the minds of the mainstream youth, the two things need to intersect and combine. And that’s exactly what we plan to do. Our magazine will cover subjects regarding race, gender, sexuality, age, liberation, women’s rights, activism, disability, and more, all tied up together in an aesthetically pleasing, contemporary women’s magazine. We will subvert the format of ordinary celebrity or fashion magazines to highlight key issues in today’s world. We will interview and talk to influential women about their opinions, highlight key feminist community groups that you could get involved in, and will review, discuss, and critique women’s role in the media.

Parallel Magazine will discuss achievements outside of fashion and beauty, will talk about community and activism and how you, as a woman, can make a change to the world around you. It will focus on everything from art to pop culture to history – all through the viewpoint of a modern young feminist.

But we need your help.

Back us on Kickstarter now!

CONTRIBUTE HERE

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JOURNALISTS: Conduct Interviews with Authority Figures and Experts who work and/or relate to THESE 8 THEMES.

EVERYONE: Contribute ideas of theme-related professions the Community can interview.

VIDEO EDITORS: Edit together Interviews for one of the Season 2 Themes.

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NOTE: Please refer to THIS ALBUM when contributing your interviews.

Watch on letnoorshine.tumblr.com

My GET TO KNOW ME video is up!!!!! Thank you all for sending in questions, I will be making more videos because I definitely didn’t get to all of them, but be sure to SUBSCRIBE TO MY CHANNEL!!!! youtube.com/ntagouri

I love this trend where the word “crime” is disappearing from American journalist lexicon only to be slowly replaced with “terrorism”.

Everything is terrorism nowadays. Hacking just doesn’t sound cool enough, it’s cyber terrorism. Looting sounds like hooting, which isn’t very threatening; let’s call it economic terrorism. Political dissidents? More like domestic terrorists, amirite?

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