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Dahlia Maubane, a 26-year-old South African photographer, started photographing street hairstylists in Johannesburg two years ago when she was drawn to the variety of hairstyles they created, and their calls to customers of “Woza, sisi!” (Come here, sister!).

Over time she learned how the women organize themselves in their informal market space in Johannesburg’s city center, seated on chairs with cardboard signs depicting the styles they can create. She discovered the ways they helped each other, and heard about the changes they’d seen take place in the sprawling city over the past 20 years.

Maubane recently exhibited her colorful photographs of the hairstylists as part of a monthlong photo festival called the Joburg Photo Umbrella, which runs through November 30.

Community engagement like this is what the festival’s organizer, the Market Photo Workshop, a Johannesburg-based photography training institute, hoped would occur. Featuring talks, workshops, public exhibitions and a reality-TV-style “photomarathon,” the Joburg Photo Umbrella is a showcase of images from all corners of South Africa’s largest city.

See more photos and get the story at Newsweek.com

(Bing-bong) 

ARTHUR (into cabin address): Ladies and gentlemen, as you can see, our onboard transit process today has now reached its ultimate termination.

CAROLYN: He means we’ve landed.

ARTHUR: Yes. So, as yourselves prepare for disemboarding, if I could kindly ask you to kindly ensure you retain all your personal items about your person throughout the duration of the disembarkation.

CAROLYN: He means take your stuff with you.

ARTHUR: In concluding, it’s been a privilege for ourselves to conduct yourselves through the in-flight experience today, and I do hope you’ll re-favour ourselves with the esteem of your forth-looking custom going forward.

CAROLYN: … No idea.

—  This week, Today, Johannesburg! (x)
Linguistics in Cabin Pressure's "Johannesburg" episode: formal vocabulary, Spanish, and onomatopoeia

Several instances of humour deriving from unnecessarily formal vocabulary choice: 

(Bing-bong.) 
ARTHUR (into cabin address): Ladies and gentlemen, as you can see, our onboard transit process today has now reached its ultimate termination.
CAROLYN: He means we’ve landed.
ARTHUR: Yes. So, as yourselves prepare for disemboarding, if I could kindly ask you to kindly ensure you retain all your personal items about your person throughout the duration of the disembarkation.
CAROLYN: He means take your stuff with you.
ARTHUR: In concluding, it’s been a privilege for ourselves to conduct yourselves through the in-flight experience today, and I do hope you’ll re-favour ourselves with the esteem of your forth-looking custom going forward.
CAROLYN: … No idea.

DOUGLAS: Little flashing warning light, Captain. Anti-icing, the starboard wing, declaring itself Rabbit of Negative Euphoria.
MARTIN: What?!
DOUGLAS: Not A Happy Bunny.

One of the reasons it’s especially easy to get such humour in English is that we have many tripartite vocabulary sets where the least formal is of Germanic etymology, the more formal is French, and the most formal is Latin, such as kingly, royal, regal. (Sometimes you also get a still more formal one from Ancient Greek, although it may be found only in compounds via Latin.) Anyway, here’s a short video introduction to the topic, and a related bit of humour in Scintillate, scintillate, globule lucific

The name Albacete illustrates two interesting features about Spanish:

1) It’s clearly a Spanish word borrowed from Arabic. They can often be spotted because many of them begin with al-, which Spanish borrowers didn’t realize was the Arabic definite article. Other examples, which English subsequently acquired via Spanish, include algebra and alcohol.

2) The pronunciation [alβaˈθete] illustrates a feature of Castilian Spanish where c and z are pronounced [θ], unlike in Latin American Spanish, where they are pronounced [s]. 

Arthur’s song ends up illustrating a few examples of cross-linguistic onomatopoeia, which are one of the things that gets cited in discussions of the arbitrariness of the sign: even things that seem like really clear examples of sound symbolism have a certain arbitrary element. At any rate, here’s a far more extensive list of onomatopoeia in various languages.

Martin illustrates the all-too-common issue of confusing all of one’s non-maternal languages when he tries to address the engineer, by mixing Spanish, French, and possibly Latin in bonus

MARTIN (loudly): Hello! Hello! El … engineero! Wake up, please!
ARTHUR: Skip!
MARTIN: Please answer, por favor! It’s important!
(He bangs on the door again.)
MARTIN: Très importante! Will pay extra – bonus lucre! Gracias!

Part of cabinpressureadvent (see there for episodes & details). 

Previous linguistics in Cabin PressureAirline vs Airdot in Abu DhabiStructural ambiguity and scalar implicature in BostonSuperlatives and “would do” in CremonaAt-issue-ness, passives, and metaphors in DouzWhy “Edinbra”, plural sports teams, and “posh Welsh” in EdinburghMore on Edinburgh/Edinbra,Word games in Fitton.

Season 2: NATO alphabet and chiasmus in HelsinkiPolish names and sportscaster present in GdanskExpletive infixation, strong past, Gricean maxims, and quantifiers in Ipswich