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Star-studded guests of monkeylazarus's Employee of the Month show at joespub last night. The guests included comedy-writer Simon Rich, Top Chef Tom Colicchio, musician Stephin Merritt (Magnetic Fields) and legendary Mad Magazine cartoonist Al Jaffee!

I Deserve Justice: Native Women From Alaska - 5 Part Series

This September, as world leaders make their way to the United Nations for the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, five brave Alaska Native women are traveling to New York to ask the world to assist them in their journey for justice for women. 

This series highlights the five women featured in Sliver of a Full Moon, a new play about this journey, at Joe’s Pub at The Public on September 21.

Part 4 - Joann Horn

Joann speaks about her work at the Emmonak Women’s Shelter in a documentary about the survival of Native women in Alaska, Daughters of Emmonak.

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"First of all, I would like to share with you all that I am a survivor of domestic violence.  I have been in and out of shelter programs with my children.  After seeing what I made my children go through, I decided not to take the abuse anymore with my kids.  I felt sorry for them because they saw and heard the abuse between me and my husband.  Therefore, I decided to start working at the shelter and start working as a relief advocate to rural outreach program, and now I work as executive director of the Emmonak Woman’s Shelter (“EWS”). 

EWS has provided advocacy services since 1979, and shelter services since 1984.  In 2005, however, the State of Alaska eliminated our funding.  As a result, we struggled to remain open full time and were forced to close. 

With funding from the Office on Violence against Women, U.S.DOJ, we were able to open our Shelter again soon after. Our Shelter has 3 bedrooms, which can serve at the most 15 women and children total. Flooding earlier this year has damaged the Shelter, although we still use the Shelter, but we are looking for funding to rehabilitate or build us a new shelter. Our primary barriers to providing services to victims is funding; we need funding for heating fuel to keeping our Shelter warm in the long cold winters, electricity to keep our heating furnace operating and lights in our Shelter, and food for victims in our Shelter.  Another huge challenge is transportation.  Many of our victims live in villages where the only mode of transportation is by plane and by boat.  For instance, for a victim from the nearest village to fly to our shelter one-way, EWS must pay at least $200.  EWS cannot currently afford to pay the return trip home once the victim is safe to return to her community.  Our inability to fund travel prevents many women from seeking shelter who desperately need it.  

So for many years I have been a help to many women and children who have come to our shelter for help.  I have helped many from our area that I’ve spoken to.  Today we must stand our ground. We cannot have people from the State continue to come down and walk all over us and control us Natives.

We want respect for or future generations, for all of our native people.  This is why I’m still working for safety for women and children across the state.  Our women should be treated with respect.”

Background:

In 1978, the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in Oliphant v. Suquamish Indan Tribe, declaring that American Indian Nations could no longer exercise jurisdiction over non-native offenders who commit crimes on tribal lands. Although the re-authorization of the Violence Against Women Act (“VAWA”) in March 2013 restores a portion of the jurisdiction that Oliphant stripped away to American Indian Nations, VAWAspecifically excludes 228 federally recognized tribes in Alaska. Consequently, as a result of Section 910 of VAWA 2013, Alaska Native women remain the only group of Native women whose tribal governments cannot protect them. To learn more, read: www.sliverofafullmoon.org

I Deserve Justice: Native Women From Alaska - 5 Part Series

This September, as world leaders make their way to the United Nations for the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples, five brave Alaska Native women are traveling to New York to ask the world to assist them in their journey for justice for women. 

This series highlights the five women featured in Sliver of a Full Moon, a new play about this journey, at Joe’s Pub at The Public on September 21.

PART 3 - Tami Jerue

Tamra “Tami” Truett Jerue is a long time Alaska Native woman’s advocate and lives in the Athabascan village of Anvik, Alaska along the Yukon River. Currently, she works as the Director of Social Services for the Anvik Tribal Council. Tami has worked in various capacities on violence against Native women issues since 1977, helping to facilitate change at a community level, within systems, and families to help survivors live violence free lives.

 

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Read Tamra Truett Jerue’s Statement on Why Alaska Native Women Deserve Justice

Read Chief Carl (Anvik Tribe) Jerue’s statement on why Section 910 of VAWA 2013 is devestating to Alaskan tribes and Alaskan Native women:  Anvik_FinalTestimonyJan_15_2014.

Background:

In 1978, the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in Oliphant v. Suquamish Indan Tribe, declaring that American Indian Nations could no longer exercise jurisdiction over non-native offenders who commit crimes on tribal lands. Although the re-authorization of the Violence Against Women Act (“VAWA”) in March 2013 restores a portion of the jurisdiction that Oliphant stripped away to American Indian Nations, VAWAspecifically excludes 228 federally recognized tribes in Alaska. Consequently, as a result of Section 910 of VAWA 2013, Alaska Native women remain the only group of Native women whose tribal governments cannot protect them. To learn more, read: www.sliverofafullmoon.org

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JOE’S PUB IS LOOKING FOR ARTISTS WHO WOULD LIKE TO DRAW LIVE PERFORMANCES ON OUR STAGE!!!

For six years, Michael Arthur has been our Archival Artist, capturing dozens of performances as they happen. Now, we would like to invite you to participate.

If you want a chance to come and draw live during a performance at Joe’s Pub, please send us some sketchbook drawings you’ve done of musicians, actors and dancers. Each drawing will be reviewed by Joe’s Pub and Michael Arthur and several will be shared on our Tumblr.

Later this year we will extend an invitation for artists to draw a live performance in the venue.

Do you want to draw live at Joe’s Pub? Submit your sketchbook drawings HERE. (Please be sure to include your contact information.)

On October 30 we will be hosting a public reception for Michael Arthur on the mezzanine at The Public Theater (425 Lafayette Street, New York, NY 10003) where 20 of his portraits will be on display.

 

[From Michael Arthur: Here are a few drawings from one night at Joe’s Pub, drawn from the vantage point of the sound and light booth. First up was the midway performance of Mike Daisey’s 29 part monologue All The Faces Of The Moon. I’ve drawn Mike before, but usually he’s alone at his table. His co-stars for this ambitious piece are a series of paintings by is Larissa Tokmakova, and it seemed only fitting that I include a drawing of the night’s painting. Next up was Joey Arias, a performer who defies categorization, but if you wanted to try you could pull out “cabaret”, “chanteuse”, “Rocker”, “Mocker”, “Diva” and the list goes on. Joey is one of a kind. That’s it. A night at Joe’s Pub. It can run the gamut from one man with a story to tell to … Well, really anywhere imagination, talent and creativity can take you. As an artist trying to capture the energy on the stage, I have enjoyed the wondrous unpredictability of Joe’s Pub.]

For more information about Joe’s Pub, visit: http://www.joespub.com/

For more information on Michael Arthur, visit: http://inklines.tumblr.com/

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