"The Earth is Mother of all living things. Since all beings have the same mother, we are all brothers and sisters.”  - BASED ON BUDDHIST TEACHINGS

Buddhism is based on living a peaceful and meaningful life. Buddhists believe that protecting life is harmonious because the earth sustains each and every living thing. Between the long-continued demand for powdered rhino horn and the steady clearing of land, the Indian rhinoceros has declined heavily in numbers. Currently, most Indian rhinos exist only in zoos and wildlife sanctuaries.

Art by Jay Jocham

TYPECRUSH OF THE MOMENT

Hubert Jocham's ability to create distinctive personality within a typeface is impressive. He is a master with scripts. Take a look at Jocham, his namesake typeface - a bold, legible, friendly, flowing upright script (available with a slanted italic). 

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I also love his Narziss collection. Available in text which is legible at smaller sizes as well as a large-size-only display with the most gracefully fine join. The swirly swashes and decorative drops offer an endless supply of excitement to an incredible neoclassic design.

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NewJune is another beauty. I love when font families cover both sans and serif. It’s a rare thing for both versions to be so appealing and unique yet still feel like part of the same family. Both feel simultaneously ultra-modern and classic. 

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"Cutting down trees and killing animals as you please,

will surely cut short your own life.”  - BASED ON A MAYAN ADAGE

One of the most spectular birds in the world, the Resplendent Quetzal was considered sacred by the Maya. Its plumes, plucked from live birds, were worn by high nobility, and anyone who harmed the regal bird faced severe punishment. The Quetzal lives at high elevations in the Central American cloud forests. Since fragile interrelationships exist between plants and animals of the rainforest, any disturbance in the ecological cycle can leave long-lasting consequences.

Even today, no one knows how many Quetzal live in the rainforest.

Art by Jay Jocham

"Every part of the earth is sacred,

every singing bird, humming insect,

and shining pine needle.

We are a part of the Earth and it is part of us.” - BASED ON THE WRITINGS OF CHIEF SEATTLE


A Douglas fir tree can grow as high as a 30-story building and live for more than 1,000 years. The Haida depended on the giant trees for their houses, canoes, and their elaborately carved poles called totems. Such totems portrayed animals that represented family history or clan from which families believed they were decended. The Marbled Murrelet also depends on ancient trees for their survival. Nesting in the tallest firs far from their ocean home, the secretive murrelet was only recently discovered as a seasonal forest dweller. A multitude of animals and plants are linked to old growth forests. As these forests disappear, so does the wildlife that give old forests their richness.

Art by Jay Jocham

"Graceful rare crane

leaping, struting and prancing,

feathers glowing white.

Teaching people to dance with the sun,

and always, with the dragonflies.”  - BASED ON NATIVE AMERICAN SONG


The north country abounds in wildlife, and the Menominee People provided for themselves from the forests with little harm to the land that surrounded them. A sophisticated native culture of story and dance, the Menominee have preserved their heritage and their land for many generations. Whooping Cranes are one of the rarest birds on earth. Once dwindling to just 16 birds, they presently number 300 birds in the wild. Whooping Cranes face each other, spread their wings wide and turn in a slow circular display. One native story tells how cranes first taught people to dance. When the Menominee dance, they become closer to the power of the natural world and to their beloved cranes, which are now returning to the wetlands of Wisconsin.

Art by Jay Jocham

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