jennifer-mccurdy

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Jennifer McCurdy is a porcelain artist with a strong interest for dynamic form and pattern. She begins her process by throwing a form, she then alters it and incises into her work to create impossible-like forms. What I find fascinating about her impeccable work is the ability with which she details her pieces, rendering them fragile, but at the same time so balanced. Normally, color is one of the first things that catches my eye, however, in this case, I find the lack of color breathtaking. The patters and dynamic textures are more than enough.

(Posted 10/15/13)

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Jennifer McCurdy

Wind Bowl

“Emotion fills me when I see perfect forms in nature, from the cracked conch shell on the beach revealing its perfect spiral, to the milkweed pod burst in the field, its brilliant airborne seeds streaming into the sunlight. The ordered symmetry and asymmetry of nature’s forms reveal the growth of life, the movement of life.”

-Jennifer McCurdy

Jennifer McCurdy

Jennifer McCurdy’s profile on Ceramics Now Magazine - View her works

Ceramic artist Jennifer McCurdy lives on the island of Martha’s Vineyard.  She has been working with porcelain for over twenty five years. For the last few years, she has been working with structural questions. How thin can the high fire porcelain be before it collapses in the fire? How much can it be cut away and still maintain structural integrity? How can the structural form be integrated with the visual, as in nature? How can the movement of the potter’s wheel and the fire of the kiln be reflected in the finished piece, which is rock-hard and permanent? 

“Emotion fills me when I see perfect forms in nature, from the cracked conch shell on the beach revealing its perfect spiral, to the milkweed pod burst in the field, its brilliant airborne seeds streaming into the sunlight. The ordered symmetry and asymmetry of nature’s forms reveal the growth of life, the movement of life.

Living on Martha’s Vineyard, island time, especially in the winter, seems to conform to nature’s cycles. As a potter, I strive to make my work reflect the balance of life around me. It is important that the patterns I see around me are integrated into my forms.” Jennifer McCurdy

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Jennifer McCurdy

Vortex Vessel

“It is still about creating movement and balance in a porcelain vessel form. The clay is so plastic, alive, under your fingers when you throw it on the wheel, the wet clay so giving when you alter it, and it becomes molten and soft in the white-hot belly of the kiln. But after it cools it is hard - one of the hardest substances know to man, so it is all too easy for it to lose its motion. ” -McCurdy