is butch my favorite or is it him

fangfangirl88 asked:

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE BUTCH DELORIA HEADCANON

OH GOSH— I have a lot sdfvgdfvg But my favorite? Hm…

Butch gets anxious/afraid by the outside world rather easy. Like, he’ll sometimes say “Man. That creeps me out. That thing up there. You know, the sky.” He grew up in a vault, so he was incredibly sheltered from what the world really was like; making it all seem rather new and even rather frightening at times. I also think he probably cried when he had to spend his first night alone in the wastes? Like, he had no one, his last bit of family was back in the vault, his friends were all gone— It was just him. He can act big, bad, and tough all he wants, but he’s still just a somewhat frightened little child. I also think he has trouble with being alone? Like, if you have him as a companion and you want him to stay and wait for you (or if he gets too far away), he’ll sometimes say “You’re not gonna leave me here, are you?” The fact that he didn’t exactly have that many people to rely on growing up paired with the fact that the wasteland really kinda freaks him out, I believe that him being left alone, even for a short while, would make him anxious. In my mind, he has serious abandonment issues and hates to be by himself for the most part.

neversaw-youcoming asked:

Hey! nice to find a fellow BW fan on tumblr that like actually posts about him sometime! I'm going to see him for the first time in May! I am so excited! I've been a fan since the spade and this is the first time I've been able to go!

Yay! I am so excited for you! I am taking my pop to his first Butch show in Chicago and I am really excited. I love it when people get to see him for the first time. My dad actually was really happy when I called him during the Dec 30th show when Butch played “ATL” (my dad’s favorite Butch song) and I let him listen live, so I anticipate a good show for him.

My first time seeing him was a really long time ago. He was in Marvelous 3 and they were playing some thing with Lit in STL where I hail from. I didn’t see him again til ‘06 or ‘07 I think (those two years’ worth of concerts blur together).

He has only gotten better, honestly. :)

New post (Thank You, Bruce Willis, For Making Bald Beautiful) has been published on My Entertainment Blog

New Post has been published on http://www.sofunnycat.com/thank-you-bruce-willis-for-making-bald-beautiful/

Thank You, Bruce Willis, For Making Bald Beautiful

By Michael Friedman, Ph.D.

Bruce Willis is a hair hero.

I can think of no better way to celebrate Bruce Willis’ 60th birthday than by thanking him for making the world better for bald men everywhere. Sure, a celebrity’s birthday is an excellent opportunity to examine their professional work. And Bruce Willis has given us some pop culture dandies: Die Hard, The Sixth Sense, Look Who’s Talking, and my personal favorite, Nobody’s Fool, to name a few. But it was Bruce Willis deciding to shave his head for the role of Butch Coolidge in Pulp Fiction that made a definitive statement — losing your hair can be cool. And in doing so he helped a lot of men, including this author, go from despair to determination.

It’s hard to remember Bruce Willis with hair — you really have to go back to the Moonlighting days. But hair he had — and lots of it. And this is what made his transformation so important. Sure, there were other people with shaved heads around — Yul Brynner, Telly Savalas, Michael Jordan, the Dalai Lama. Even Ving Rhames transitioned to a shaved head in Pulp Fiction. But Bruce Willis was different not READ MORE HERE

Via:: Huffington Post – Entertainment News

      

http://bit.ly/1bCCgfs

#funnypics

Thank You, Bruce Willis, For Making Bald Beautiful

Bruce Willis is a hair hero.

I can think of no better way to celebrate Bruce Willis’ 60th birthday than by thanking him for making the world better for bald men everywhere. Sure, a celebrity’s birthday is an excellent opportunity to examine their professional work. And Bruce Willis has given us some pop culture dandies: Die Hard, The Sixth Sense, Look Who’s Talking, and my personal favorite, Nobody’s Fool, to name a few. But it was Bruce Willis deciding to shave his head for the role of Butch Coolidge in Pulp Fiction that made a definitive statement — losing your hair can be cool. And in doing so he helped a lot of men, including this author, go from despair to determination.

It’s hard to remember Bruce Willis with hair — you really have to go back to the Moonlighting days. But hair he had — and lots of it. And this is what made his transformation so important. Sure, there were other people with shaved heads around — Yul Brynner, Telly Savalas, Michael Jordan, the Dalai Lama. Even Ving Rhames transitioned to a shaved head in Pulp Fiction. But Bruce Willis was different not only because he was a leading man but also because his hair was originally part of his appeal. So watching him lose his hair and seamlessly transition to a shaved head while maintaining and perhaps even enhancing his status as a sex symbol was something very different and liberating.

It may seem trivial and vain to some, but for men, going bald is a big deal. While body image concerns stereotypically are associated with women, there is actually evidence that men are just as, if not more, concerned with their body image. And the consequences can be significant.

For example, a recent longitudinal study of boys ages 12-18 from 1999-2010 found that boys with high concerns about thinness were more likely to develop depression, and those with concerns about both muscularity and thinness were more likely to use drugs. In the most extreme cases, poor body image can result in dangerous use of performance enhancing drugs such as anabolic steroids.

And going bald is a major body image concern for men. For example, one study of 729 men who reported experiencing hair loss, over 70 percent reported hair to be an important feature of body image, and 62 percent said that hair loss could affect self-esteem. Further, 43 percent felt that hair loss would mean losing an important part of one’s attractiveness. Dermatologists are becoming more aware of the importance of managing the psychological consequences of alopecia (hair loss) in men.

And it’s not just men — hair loss can be a substantial body image issue for women as well. Approximately one-third of women experience alopecia at some point in their lives. As many as two-thirds of post-menopausal women can experience hair thinning or bald spots. And hair loss can be associated with psychological and social issues. One study of 157 women in an outpatient dermatology clinic found that 54 percent of women reported hair loss, and that complaints about hair loss were significantly related to increased depressive symptoms as well as relationship problems.

Thanks to pioneers like Bruce Willis, however, the world looks different for bald men. It seems like everyone is rocking a shaved head nowadays, from Vin Diesel to Jason Stratham to Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson. Even Willis’ former Pulp Fiction and Die Hard co-star Samuel L. Jackson has a shaved head. And we are starting to see shaved heads become more common and acceptable among women. Years after Sinead O’Connor began to wear a shaved head, model Amber Rose now sports the shaved-head look.

And while some may dismiss this trend as irrelevant, we know that media images influence body image, particularly among kids. And as more and more celebrities rock the shaved head look, so will more people become comfortable with hair loss, and have at least one option of how to manage it. The best thing about this trend is that it’s not news. At all. The notion that people can be attractive without hair is sinking in.

So ‘Happy Birthday’ to you, Bruce Willis.

And thanks for the bald gift that keeps on giving.

from Healthy Living - The Huffington Post http://ift.tt/1IEEGFq
via IFTTT

I honestly don’t think I would use the word “hate,” but for my 17th birthday, I went to an Avril Lavigne concert in Tampa solely because I wanted to see Butch Walker (my favorite musician) and Gavin DeGraw (my favorite example that dates this story) perform as her openers for this tour. I knew the only other way I’d be able to see Butch Walker in concert (solo) in Florida was if I could have someone with a car drive me to Orlando. No one at the time was going to drive me to Orlando just to go see Butch Walker, and this was my first chance to see him live, which is the best way to experience him. The tickets (which I still have saved in a box back in Florida) weren’t exactly cheap and a friend of mine paid for them as a gift, but I seriously would have tried to convince her to bail after the opening sets if not for the fact that I knew Butch would come back to sing a cover of “Song 2” with Avril on drums later in the night. The Avril concert itself wasn’t bad, but I’d already winded down on my teen “Avril phase” at that point, and it felt like the longest concert ever at times. As for Gavin DeGraw’s set—you wouldn’t believe how many moms were into it. Or maybe you would.

casually leaves this here and hides in shame