irisharchaeology

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Archaeologists uncover one of Derry City’s earliest buildings
Source: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2015/01/archaeologists-uncover-derry-citys-earliest-building/

Archaeologists working in Derry have uncovered the partial remains of a building, which pre-dates the walled city and is believed to have been burnt down during the O’Doherty rising of 1608. All that survives of the building, which was of timber frame construction, with a slate roof, is a stone cellar. When the building burnt down its wooden walls and roof collapsed into the cellar where they have been now found by archaeologists. A collection of artefacts was also unearthed during the dig including musket balls, a small cannon ball,………. Read More at http://irisharchaeology.ie/2015/01/archaeologists-uncover-derry-citys-earliest-building/

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Ireland’s Ancient Dairy Past Revealed
Source: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2015/01/irelands-ancient-dairy-past-revealed/

Source New research from the University of Bristol has revealed the antiquity of dairy farming in Ireland. Research published today in the Journal of Environmental Archaeology shows that dairying on the island goes back approximately 6,000 years, revealed through traces of ancient dairy fats found in pots dating to around 4,000 to 2,500 BC. Dr Jessica Smyth of Bristol’s School of Chemistry analysed nearly 500 pots from the Neolithic, the period when people switched from hunting and gathering to farming.  In Britain and Ireland, this change occurred around 4,000 BC, more than 1,000 years later………. Read More at http://irisharchaeology.ie/2015/01/irelands-ancient-dairy-past-revealed/

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Site of famous 19th century ‘shipwreck’ discovered in Dundrum Bay, Co. Down
Source: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2015/01/site-of-famous-19th-century-shipwreck-discovered-in-dundrum-bay-co-down/

Archaeologists have located the exact position where a famous 19th century ship, the ss Great Britain, was grounded for nearly a year in 1846. Designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the ss Great Britain was then the longest passenger ship in the world  and its grounding made international headlines. The incident, which was the result of a gross navigational error, left Brunel’s second great ship high and dry on the sands at Dundrum Bay, and it was only after a lengthy salvage that the vessel was rescued and put back into service. The exact position of the incident………. Read More at http://irisharchaeology.ie/2015/01/site-of-famous-19th-century-shipwreck-discovered-in-dundrum-bay-co-down/

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Revealing a 17th century town: Exciting discoveries at Dunluce, Co. Antrim
Source: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2015/01/revealing-a-17th-century-town-exciting-discoveries-at-dunluce-co-antrim/

Dunluce Castle by Shanliss Snapper A team of archaeologists, which includes Dr. Colin Breen of the University of Ulster and Andrew Gault of the NIEA, are making exciting discoveries at Dunluce, Co. Antrim. This innovative archaeological research programme, which includes volunteer and apprenticeship opportunities, is revealing a wealth of information about an abandoned 17th century town. Located in the shadow of the iconic Dunluce Castle, the town was founded………. Read More at http://irisharchaeology.ie/2015/01/revealing-a-17th-century-town-exciting-discoveries-at-dunluce-co-antrim/

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The Shrine of St. Lachtin’s Arm
Source: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2015/01/the-shrine-of-st-lachtins-arm/

St. Lachtin’s Arm Saint Lachtin’s Arm is an important religious relic that was associated with Donoughmore church in Co. Cork. Dating from circa 1120 AD, it was made to encase a human bone, purportedly belonging to Saint Lachtin.  The shrine’s hereditary guardians were the Healy family and for much of the medieval period they were entrusted with its safekeeping. Circa 400 mm tall, the shrine has a hollow core of yew wood, which originally contained an arm bone. The wooden core is ornamented with elaborate bronze panels that are decorated in zoomorphic interlace, highlighted with………. Read More at http://irisharchaeology.ie/2015/01/the-shrine-of-st-lachtins-arm/

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Guiding ships for 800 years: Hook Lighthouse, Co. Wexford
Source: http://irisharchaeology.ie/2015/01/guiding-ships-for-800-years-hook-lighthouse-co-wexford/

The iconic Hook Head lighthouse represents one of the oldest operational lighthouses in the world.  It stands on the very tip of the windswept Hook peninsula in Co. Wexford, overlooking a number of important shipping routes. Circa 800 years old, it was erected in the early 13th century by the great Anglo-Norman magnate, William Marshall, with assistance from the monks of the nearby monastery at Rinn Dubhain[1]. Marshall built the lighthouse to guide merchant ships sailing in and out of his newly founded town (and port) at New Ross. Isometric………. Read More at http://irisharchaeology.ie/2015/01/guiding-ships-for-800-years-hook-lighthouse-co-wexford/