8 Tips on Dating an Introvert

#1. Take Things Slowly.

Introverts are typically less open to new experiences and ideas when they are not ready to take on those things. Don’t pressure an introvert into doing things, or try to make them an extrovert. Dating an introvert is an investment of time, and it’s something that has to be fully respected by both parties involved. Build trust by doing things within the introverts comfort zone, while also keeping communication open to better understand what makes the introvert comfortable versus uncomfortable. Introduce them to your friends but do it slowly, and make sure you balance one-on-one time with introduction time, and new experiences.

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14 Truths About Being An Introvert

Hey guys, just came across this  awesome post, let us know if these characteristics describe you. 

1. An introverted person can function better when working alone, than when working in a team. It’s not about being a “team player”, it’s about what can help them produce the best possible result. And working in a team, well…it’s is distracting.

2. Being quiet does not mean “having nothing to say”. It means that one simply enjoys being quiet. As an introvert, I find some of my most satisfying moments when I am in a gathering and observe people talk, without saying something myself. Why don’t you speak? Because I am perfectly content absorbing the stimuli of my surroundings without producing any of my own.

3. Going out in a coffee shop with your book, work, or music, and enjoying that perfect little state between sociability, but without interaction, is very, very satisfying.

4. Introverts choose who they connect with very carefully. And when that connection has been made, it runs deep. Some people can be all depth, instead of breadth. And that is perfectly okay. 

Read more at: http://www.learning-mind.com/14-truths-about-being-an-introvert-that-mainly-introverts-will-understand/

Problems That Only Introverts Understand

1. Practicing conversations with people you’ll never talk to.

2. When you want to cut all ties to civilization but still be on the internet.

3. When your friend wants to invite more people over, and you don’t want to sound like a bad person by saying no.

4. When spending a heavenly weekend alone means that you’re missing out on time with friends.

5. And you fear that by doing so, you are nearing ‘hermit’ status.

6. When your ride at a party doesn’t want to leave early, and no one seems to understand your distress.

7. Trying to be extra outgoing when you flirt so your crush doesn’t think you hate them.

8. That feeling of dread that washes over you when the phone rings and you’re not mentally prepared to chat.

9. When you have an awesome night out, but have to deal with feeling exhausted for days after the fact.

10. People saying “Just be more social.”

11. When you’re able to enjoy parties and meetings, but after a short amount of time wish you were home in your pajamas.

12. Staying up late every night because it’s the only time that you can actually be alone.

13. People making you feel weird for wanting to do things by yourself.

14. Having more conversations in your head than you do in real life.

15. The need to recharge after social situations.

16. People calling you out for day dreaming too much.

17. Carrying a book to a public place so no one will bug you, but other people take that as a conversation starter.

18. People interrupting your thoughts, and you get irrationally angry.

19. Having to say “I kind of want to spend some time by myself” when you have to deal with that friend that always wants to hang out.

20. When you’re asked to do a group project, and know that you’re going to hate every minute of it.

21. When you hear the question “Wanna hang out?”, and your palms start to sweat with anxiety.

22. When you hear, “Are you OK?” or “Why are you so quiet?” for the umpteenth time.

23. Having visitors stay with you is a nightmare, because it means you have to be on at ALL TIMES.

24. When people stop inviting you places because you’re the one that keeps canceling plans.

25. Being horrified of small talk, but enjoying deep discussions.

26. When you need to take breaks and recharge after socializing for too long.

27. The requirement to think introspectively rather than go to someone else with your problems.

28. Not wanting to be alone, just wanting to be left alone. And people not understanding that.

29. When people mistake your thoughtful look for being shy, or worse, moody.

30. That people need to know that you aren’t mad, depressed or anti-social. You just need to not talk to anyone for a while. And that’s okay.

Introverts, unlike our more populous extroverted counterparts, actually enjoy, benefit from, and need alone time. We find joy in ourselves and don’t need others to have a good time.

I am a very introverted person who enjoys spending time alone, but l do occasionally like to pop out of my bubble and meet other people. When l connect with people, l connect very deeply. I’m not very surface, l can’t cold talk. I always get straight to the core: l want to know what their biggest defeat is or such like. Introverts created the world: Albert Einstein, Steve Jobs, Michael Jackson, they are all introverts. Those are the people that take the time to come up with an original idea. Push the world forward.
—  Lykke Li (via missconceptions)
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Susan Cain, The Power of Introverts — TED (2012)

Susan unpacks the social myths surrounding introversion in this passionate and personal appeal.