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Muhammad Ali yells at Sonny Liston to get up in the first round of their heavyweight title fight on May 25, 1965. The bout, which ended after just two minutes and 12 seconds, is perhaps the most confounding and controversial in ring history. Yet half a century later the fistic fever dream of Ali-Liston II remains one of the iconic moments of an era and a touchstone in the career of our most protean athlete. (Neil Leifer for SI)

GALLERY: Ali-Liston II, 50 years later

“Troops of the 165th infantry, New York’s former "Fighting 69th” advance on Butaritari Beach, Makin Atoll, which already was blazing from naval bombardment which preceded on November 20, 1943. The American forces seized the Gilbert Island Atoll from the Japanese.“

(AP)

Two Royal Air Force Hawker Tempest Vs, no doubt at full pelt, intercept a V1 flying bomb during the latter stages of the Second World War. The V1, also known as the doodlebug or buzz-bomb, posed quite the problem for Britain as only the latest fighters could catch the things and once they did, simply shooting at one still detonated its high explosive contents. The solution was to fly up to within 6 inches of the V1s wing and use the airflow over the interceptor’s own wing to induce an unrecoverable spin. Damn hairy stuff.

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This blog post is one in a series on a recent tour to the Ardennes which gave Museum volunteers and staff an in-depth look into the scenes of the Battle of the Bulge, Hitler’s last desperate attempt to stop the Allied drive in western Europe in the cold winter months of December 1944 and January 1945.

During the tour, we visited two of the American cemeteries maintained by the American Battle Monuments Commission, which became the final resting place for thousands of American combatants who lost their lives in the Battle of the Bulge.  One of the largest and costliest battles the US Army would fight, the Battle of the Bulge  resulted in 67,000 American casualties.

At Luxembourg American Cemetery, we visited the grave of General George Patton, laid a wreath in the chapel to honor all of those buried there, and paid tribute to one particular serviceman, Wendell Wiley Wolfenbarger, known to us previously only through the material held in the Museum’s archives. Wolfenbarger was a husband, father, and postal employee from Neosho, Missouri.

On January 1, 1945 Wendell wrote to his wife, “I still can’t say where I am , but I guess that as long as I’m not in the good old United States it doesn’t make any difference…I nearly cried when you told me about Wylene waking up & crying for me, but it can’t be helped. Try to make her understand that it’ll be sometime before I can be there.”

Three days later, on January 4, 1945, Wendell wrote;

“I wonder how everything is going down at the post office? Does Archie ever say anything about it? Man alive, how I wish I were back there. I would work 24 hours per day, Sundays included and not say a word about it, no use bitching about it though, I’m here and that’s all there is to it.

Are you & the kids all right? I really do miss you all more and more. Everytime I look at your pictures I get more homesick. But at the same time I realize why we’re here and know the job musr be done. All my love to you & the kids. Darling, keep praying. Love, Wiley”

Wolfenbarger was killed in action on January 18, 1945 near Berle, Luxembourg. He served with the 26th Infantry Division. He left behind a wife, Ruby and two small children. The collection was donated to the Museum in 2012 in Memory of Ruby May Barlow Wolfenbarger.

For more information about the tours offered by the Museum, see The National WWII Museum Tours.Stay tuned for more in the series on the April tour of Museum staff and volunteers to the Ardennes region.

Post by Curator Kimberly Guise.