7

THE ADVENTURES OF SAM VIMES
(Aka: see, look, I had the badge on for a while… then lost it. ::sadface.jpg::)

THIS ACTUALLY HAPPENED:

Thorin Oakenshield: Sir Samuel! We’d like to sing for you the original lyrics to the Lonely Mountain!

Dwarves, in unison: Gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold, gold… 

"You never see a positive drug story on the news. They always have the same LSD story. You’ve all seen it: "Today a young man on acid…thought he could fly…jumped out of a building…what a tragedy!" What a dick. He’s an idiot. If he thought he could fly, why didn’t he take off from the ground first? Check it out? You don’t see geese lined up to catch elevators to fly south; they fly from the fucking ground. He’s an idiot. He’s dead. Good! We lost a moron? Fucking celebrate. There’s one less moron in the world…

…Wouldn’t you like to see a positive LSD story on the news? To base your decision on information rather than scare tactics and superstition? Perhaps? Wouldn’t that be interesting? Just for once?…

"Today, a young man on acid realized that all matter is merely energy condensed to a slow vibration – that we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively. There’s no such thing as death, life is only a dream, and we’re the imagination of ourselves. Here’s Tom with the weather."

thewomanofscandal said:

I love reading your metas for Hannibal! When I saw your latest, I couldn't resist asking you a question (particularly given your interest in Classics). Recently, in my Greek class, my professor brought up the etymology of the word 'Anthology' which originally meant a bouquet of flowers. Which makes sense- picking the best of a variety to make a superior whole. So my question is: Do you think that this is what Hannibal was doing in Futamono? Essentially creating a poisonous 'Greatest Hits' list?

[bear with me my ancient greek is creaky & lapsing]

yes—ἄνθος [anthos], “flower” + λέγειν [legein], “to say/speak” or “to choose/gather/collect/pick together” [complicated verb, heidegger has a field-day with those two senses of it in his lecture “geschichte”] = anthologia, ἀνθολογία, “a flower-gathering/collection”

we’ve seen hannibal at his most derivative [the antler-impaled corpse of cassie boyle, the glasgow smile of dr. sutcliffe] and at his most creative [the “blind”, “mindless and heartless” judge]. this tableau, of a human corpse intertwined with and systemically penetrated by a tree, feels like the latter: the idea of “blooming” isn’t simply hannibal’s burgeoning affair with alana; it’s hannibal himself, growing more daring and ambitious and egotistic. 

i think it is a sort of “greatest hits”. the ripper removes organs from bodies which he already considers empty vessels, wasted flesh, and transforms them into things of beauty—exquisite morsels of food. but, beautiful as hannibal’s food appears, the meat is defiled, polluted with murder, it’s taboo, it’s toxic, it breeds corruption. 

jack names three flowers specifically; hannibal has three victims he’s presently “poisoning”: will, alana, jack. and the flowers correspond to the way that he poisoned them: “belladonna for the heart” is jack, and his love for bella; the “chain of white oleander for the intestines” is will, and the ear he was forced to ingest; “ragwort for the liver” is alana, and the poisoned wine [ragwort was once used as an aphrodisiac]. all three of these victims have eaten human flesh at hannibal’s table. 

this is hannibal’s power: to invade his victim, slice out with precise scalpel-cuts those raw parts which are most vital and human, and fill that void with his own baneful beauty. furthermore, every work of art hannibal creates is a seduction, a token of affection for will; and hannibal’s love is the love that kills.

9

Archaeological Museum of Brauron:

Fragments from vessels dedicated to the sanctuary (mostly from the classical period)

These vessels were definitely the highlight of the museum for me art-wise. Their fine lines and iconographic variety function together almost like a comic book. The rhythm and the harmony in the small scale of these compositions make them so lively, almost tangible.

I was actually having a little inner monologue about how people can’t imagine women working as painters in workshops because somehow this is considered a “fine arts” occupation, which means that they wouldn’t be “naturally” good designers. But in fact scenes and designs like these appeared in clothes according to both literary sources and contemporary research. Ancient greek garments were always pretty colourful and had really beautiful patterns. And some textiles were made like tapestries with extensive scenes from mythology. And women made these textiles.

I guess when most people picture these women weaving, they imagine them churning endless yards of plain white (or at best brownish) cloth. And so weaving is categorized for most as an uncreative and unimaginative chore.  

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