Nintendo Prepares for Future Next-Gen Console!

Nintendo has posted a job listing for a lead graphic engineer for a next-gen console. 

Description of Duties

Nintendo Technology Development is looking for a lead graphics architect in the system-on-chip architecture group in Redmond, WA. The group is responsible for the architecture of Nintendo’s game console SoCs. The graphics architect plays a key role in determining the SoC architecture. The job responsibilities are:

  • Evaluate HW graphics (GPU) offerings from SoC solutions available in the market based on performance, power, and silicon area.
  • Evaluate the performance of the SoC solutions for both proprietary and standard graphics APIs.
  • Determine workloads and simulation models for both performance and power characteristics of GPUs.
  • Keep track of GPU architectural improvements in the industry and devise strategies to incorporate them for future Nintendo gaming platforms.
  • Act as the graphics architectural evangelist working with global Nintendo teams for future and on-going programs.
  • Work with external SoC vendors as the Nintendo focal point for graphics GPU architecture.
  • Should be prepared to work through architecture, design, validation, and bring-up stages of SoC design in cooperation with internal and external teams.

Summary of Requirements

  • The ideal candidate will have had experience working directly in a GPU architecture and design team with significant responsibilities.
  • Low power and SoC design experience would be a plus.
  • The candidate is expected to have good architectural insights and the ability to apply that for setting future graphics direction for Nintendo.
  • A bachelors degree (graduate degree preferred) in computer science/engineering or electrical engineering.
  • 5+ years of lead or architectural role experience are required.

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