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It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.

There is this odd trend
of taken women
saying they are too much,
and how the men they love
are amazing for dealing with them.

Love should not be a responsibility.
You should not have to deal with me.
Just because a woman is wild
and free
does not mean she is difficult.
He is not a martyr for loving me
through the good
and not so good.

Some mornings I will wake up swinging,
you do not get a gold star
for still loving me.

Some mornings I will wake up like a lamb,
you do not get a gold star
for loving me.

I am not a hurricane of a girl,
you always have the chance to leave.

—  Michelle K., Hurricanes.
I need to sleep,
but my mind is running away
with itself to the speed of the
eye of the hurricane
approaching one of my homes.
I wish there was some certainty
for any of us tonight,
but this isn’t
to be.
The rain outside
that is normally soothing:
tonight,
is a loud reminder.
We cannot control
what will happen tomorrow.
My mind is awake
in the eye of the storm.
—  "In the Eye of the Storm" by Radha Kistler