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The Atheist Bus Campaign aims to place “peaceful and upbeat” messages about atheism on transport media in Britain, in response to evangelical Christian advertising.

It was created by comedy writer Ariane Sherine and launched on October 21, 2008, with official support from the British Humanist Association and Richard Dawkins. The campaign’s original goal was to raise £5,500 to run 30 buses across London for four weeks early in 2009 with the slogan: “There’s probably no god. Now stop worrying and enjoy your life.”

When people say, “we don’t need feminism, we’ve got humanism,” or something like that, it seems that they are driven not by their strong convictions in humanism, but rather by anti-feminism. You can see evidence of this in the Tumblr users who call themselves “humanist” or “equalist” (?) or whatever, but then you look at their posts and they are consistently trolling feminist Tumblrs. 

It’s like when anti-gay people who are against hate crime laws say, “gays and lesbians don’t need special protection, there are already laws against assault.” They are missing the fact that since gay people - and women - are being targeted and attacked for being members of a group, in a way that straight people and men aren’t, they in fact DO need extra protection. Plus the victimizers need extra punishment, as they are likely to repeat their hate crimes and attack more victims if left unstopped.

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Sorry if this doesn’t fit my blog, but what is happening in Ferguson, Missouri is no laughing matter. Our first amendment rights to free speech and peaceful assembly are being thrown out the window. Our police force is becoming increasingly militaristic and it is time that we assert ourselves as American citizens, we are NOT animals to be corralled through excessive force, we will NOT stand idly by as our basic human rights are violated, we will NOT let the police prevent journalists from keeping us informed. We demand JUSTICE for those murdered and injured through police brutality.

Write your representative

Write to President Obama

Raise awareness on social media #Ferguson

Enough is enough.

Watch on sagansense.tumblr.com

A musical tribute to Robin Williams…the latest installment to the Melodysheep series. And a fine and beautiful homage to the man.

Strive to find your own voice…

Isn’t that what we’re all attempting to do through social media?

If I could substitute my own words to conclude that quote,

…so that it may echo loudly through generations to come, inspiring others to find theirs across space and time.

anonymous said:

I'm 16 and I don't shave my legs (by my choice) and I want to wear a skirt to school tomorrow but I'm scared I'll get bullied. Advice?

GIRL

WEAR THAT SKIRT

WORK THAT SKIRT

STROKE YOUR LEG HAIR SEDUCTIVELY 

ANYONE WHO SAYS YOU ARE LESS THAN FABULOUS IS INTIMIDATED BY YOUR UNIQUENESS AND CONFIDENCE

ANYONE WHO GIVES YOU A FUNNY LOOK IS AFRAID OF ANYTHING THAT DOESN’T ADHERE TO SOCIAL NORMS

DO IT FOR THE WOMEN WHO FOUGHT FOR THEIR RIGHT TO VOTE

DO IT FOR THE WOMEN WHO FOUGHT FOR THEIR RIGHT TO OWN PROPERTY

DO IT FOR THE WOMEN WHO BURNT THEIR BRAS SO YOU COULD WEAR A SKIRT WITHOUT HAVING TO SHAVE YOUR LEGS

YOU ARE A HUMAN, NOT JUST A GIRL WHO SHOULD BE PRETTY AND SHINY AND SQUEAKY CLEAN AND HAIRLESS

YOU ARE ENTITLED TO DO WHATEVER YOU WANT WITH YOUR LEG HAIR

YOU GO GLEN COCO

In short, Humanism is being good without god. It is above all an affirmation of the greatest common values we human beings have: the desire to life with dignity, to be “good.” But humanism is also a warning that we cannot afford to wait until tomorrow of until the next life to be good, because today— the short journey we get from birth to death, womb to tomb— is all we have. Humanism rejects dependence on faith, the supernatural, divine texts, resurrection, reincarnation, or anything else which we have no evidence. To put it another way, Humanists believe in life before death.
—  Good without god- Greg M. Epstein
On feminism, and why I'm no longer calling myself a feminist.

I’d like to start by saying that I believe in the equal rights and treatment of every person on this earth. I do not care if you’re straight, gay, cis, trans, asexual, pansexual, white, black, asian, hispanic, christian, muslim, hindu, atheist, man, or woman. You deserve to be treated as any other individual on this planet. My views on equality have  changed over the years, just as the way I define myself has. This is, in part, to the toxic attitude of over-the-top social justice warriors (SJWs) and their views towards men, heterosexuals, and allies. 

I started my social justice journey in high school when a friend introduced my to something called “tumblr”. It was a cool website where you could  reblog funny pictures and posts all day. It was a good laugh and fun was had by all. Soon, I started seeing text posts explaining why women or blacks have a much harder time than their white male counterparts. I agreed with these posts, so I reblogged them and felt good about myself. This continued for months until my blog of funny pictures had turned into a blog of awareness and justice for all. Soon, it became destructive.

I saw myself becoming an ever more hateful person. I hated men. I hated white people. I hated the cis-gendered assholes who reigned with the might of the patriarchy and cast doom unto all marginalized groups. I began distancing myself from long-time friends if they made a non politically-correct joke. I would chastise people for not standing up for groups they did not belong to. I had become a warrior, a champion for social justice and bringer of equality. I did not realize how many people I would drive away with my actions.

Friends started leaving and people starting dissociating themselves with me. But hey, that’s ok because who needs those filthy cis shitlords right? Very soon, I found myself trapped in an endless cycle on online activity that shaped the person I was. I hated everyone who did not agree with me. I could not understand why they didn’t realize that they are the problem. I found myself alone every night, typing away and battling the scum of the internet. In short, it was unhealthy. Social justice became the sole thing I thought about; day in and day out. 

Then I realized I was alone. Even though I proudly called myself a feminist, according to some, my views didn’t go deep enough. While I was criticizing others for their actions, I would never threaten or wish violence on anyone. Apparently, that’s what I should have been doing, and I soon learned that I was being too soft. I needed to advocate harm and violence upon the victims of my wrath. I needed to threaten them and make them fear for their lives. I needed to make them so uncomfortable that they had no choice but to buckle and agree with me. That was a step I was not willing to take. The reparations I faced we’re ones of an outcast. I was not worthy of the favor of the other SWJs. All of a sudden, I was the shitbag who could do no right. I soon started getting anonymous threats that made me extremely uncomfortable. It was at this point that I made the decision to stop the destructive behavior that I was involved in for over a year.

Finally, I began to change my behavior. I deleted my tumblr account as to not be tempted by it. I stopped participating on online communities where anyone with any type of privilege was lambasted and hated. I traded my suit of armor for comfortable clothes and a smile. I started becoming happier and brighter and my mind stopped being clouded by hate. I could like people for who they are, even if their views differed slightly from mine. Even if people weren’t vocal about social issues, I learned that they still usually agreed with them. I started to diversify my activities and enjoy life for what it gave me. No longer did I spend my evenings in a cave “signal boosting” a post that everyone simply had to see. I made old and new friends and continued on with my life.

Looking back, the scary part about my journey was how easy it was to fall into it. It started innocently enough with me just agreeing with what I saw. Soon, like a bad drug habit, I needed more and more to satiate my need for self-righteousness. I felt that if I wasn’t standing up for every marginalized group, I was part of the problem. What had started as an innocent agreement of equality turned into a destructive period of my life. I’m just lucky that I was turned on and called a “monster” (among other hateful words) and decided I had had enough. It allowed me to break free.

I am still a feminist, in the classical sense of the word. I support the equal pay and equal treatment of women. I realize that yes, all women experience some kind of objectification in their lives. What I now refuse to do is blame every heterosexual male for the problems of society. Most men I’ve met share this view, but the very few who disrespect women are so loud and noticeable that it’s easy to label every male a pig. A better term for my beliefs is “humanist”. Women face problems, but so do men. Not every white person enjoys huge amounts of privilege. Not every skinny person is mocking people with a little weight. A social movement should be as inclusive as possible and not estrange allies. As a humanist, I believe that every single person on this earth has an equal voice, and I’m a much happier person for it.

Watch on error-808.tumblr.com

Women Against Feminism

I believe that the universe was formed around 15 billion years ago and that humans have evolved from their apelike ancestors over the past few million years. I believe we are more likely to live a good life if all humans try to work together in a world community, preserving planet earth. When decisions for groups are made in this world, I believe that the democratic process should be used. To protect the individual, I believe in freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion, freedom from religion, freedom of inquiry, and a wall of separation between church and state. When making decisions about what is right or wrong, I believe I should use my intelligence to reason about the likely consequences of my actions. I believe that I should try to increase the happiness of everyone by caring for other people and finding ways to cooperate. Never should my actions discriminate against people simply because of their race, religion, sex, sexual orientation, age, or national origin. I believe that ideas about what is right and wrong will change with education, so I am prepared to continually question ideas using evidence from experience and science. I believe there is no valid evidence to support claims for the existence of supernatural entities and deities. I will use these beliefs to guide my thinking and my actions until I find good reasons for revising them or replacing them with other beliefs that are more valid.
—  Ronald P. Carver
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