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SIGNAL BOOST!!!!

This video might be the most clever way to raise money for dogs in need, because all you need to do is watch it.

"Just by watching these puppies, you’re raising money for dogs in need," says the narrator in the video above. "You see, if a video goes viral, YouTube shares the money they made from advertising with whoever made the video, and in this case, every dollar we earn will go toward feeding, treating and finding homes for dogs who haven’t been as lucky as us."

The video comes from The Pedigree Adoption Drive, and ends by imploring viewers to share because the more views received, the more money will be raised.

So share this video. You know, for the dogs.

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Because I carry a mace gun in my purse for fear of being raped.

Because We shouldn’t have to dress more modestly to keep ourselves safe.

Because our opinions shouldn’t be written off because we’re women.

Because people see a beautiful girl and assume she’s stupid.

Because I stopped going to clubs because men would put their hands where ever they wanted.

Because I was attacked by a man and a close guy friend told me it was my fault just for being where I was.

Because I’m sick of being called crazy for crying when I get upset.

Because you can make your own fucking sandwich.

Because just because you take me out or buy me a drink, doesn’t mean I owe you anything.

Because we are all beautiful, no matter what our size, shape, skin tone, weight, or height is.

Because Not All Men is actually a thing. This isn’t about you.

#YESALLWOMEN

Andromeda Turre

The only thing that is more annoying than the question itself is both the frequency — and the freedom and authority — with which people feel they can ask it.  

In the words of one of my favorite movies, Mean Girls: “You can’t just ask people why they’re white.” It’s pretty unheard of to ask a white person their particular country of origin directly upon meeting them. Just as you probably wouldn’t ask an African-American person their particular country of origin upon meeting them — especially due to the unfortunate way in which many Africans were brought to this country, in many cases cutting off the ability to identify a country of origin. Now, I know a lot of my Asian friends get this question because people want to know “what kind of Asian” they are. But as my girl Bon Qui Qui from ”MADtv” would say, “RUDE.”

I have gotten this question all my life. At school. At the park. At parties. On the subway, a woman once tapped me on the shoulder and had me take out my headphones, interrupting my favorite Mariah Carey song, to ask me, “What are you?” She wasn’t ready for the answer she got that day, because it was just a whole lot of side eye.

The problem with this question is, for a lot of us blended people, that it doesn’t have a simple answer. In most cases, our identities were not something we were born with or something we inherited from our parents. Because our parents are different from each other and different from us. Our identities are something we chose. They are formed and cultivated over years, and some of us may still not have the answer for ourselves, so we surely can’t explain it to you. Nor should we have to. For ANY person, shaping an identity is an intimate process. And it’s more than the genetic combinations that make up the color of your skin, eyes, hair types and features.

via HuffPost

8 Great New Books By Women You Should Definitely Read

2014 has been deemed the “Year of Reading Women.”  Let’s support this movement!

The Hundred-Year House by Rebecca Makkai

Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng

Black Vodka: Ten Stories by Deborah Levy

I’ll Be Right There by Kyung-sook Shin

The Vacationers by Emma Straub

Boy, Snow, Bird by Helen Oyeyemi

Off Course by Michelle Huneven

Land of Love and Drowning by Tiphanie Yanique

 

August 27th is National Banana Lovers' Day!

That’s right everyone. We have a whole day to celebrate bananas. That means talk of banana splits, banana bread, banana creme pie, banana pancakes and whatever else we can devise that has bananas!

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Since there are some pretty creative minds out there, I assume this day will be filled with more banana recipes than I can imagine. The huffposttaste has even encouraged us to use bananas after their days of yellow have long since passed. Eating mushy bananas never sounded like a good idea, until I read all of the things you can do with them!

19 delicious ways to use overripe bananas

But when your guilt at letting those bananas fall prey to the ravages of time takes form, in the shape of a nice loaf of banana bread, be sure to check with foodtweeks™ before you hit your baking frenzy!

If you do decide to make the cream cheese filled banana bread, make sure to ask foodtweeks™ how to trim a few calories out of the recipe. You’ll get a helpful hint of using oil instead of butter which will save you 80 calories and help you enjoy your baking creation even more!

Those 80 calories are then donated from the foodtweeks™ app to a family in need through the local food bank What more can you ask for? A delectable day of bananas in everything from muffins and pie to 

Rabid and unfair, sexism and homophobia rev up fear of the bisexual traitor because we just won’t pick a side, declare our allegiance. And in a way this seems truer now than ever.

LGBTQ* Articles You May Have Missed

Three Problems for Bisexuality - by Victoria Bond (1/5/14)

In late 2013, studies and personal narratives where bisexuality factored in sprouted wild on the Internet. Inevitably, commentary about the studies and narratives cropped up, and one thing I noticed regarding the discussion is just how much is at stake where bisexuality is concerned. Bisexuality is about female sexuality and the double standards that exist between men and women. It’s also about loyalty, language and identity. In other words, bisexuality comes down to core-of-being stuff, which is the main reason the scientific consensus that has been reached over the past 20 years about bisexuality remains hazy. And in reading the flurry of pieces that emerged from this hotbed of bi cultural activity this fall and winter, three things stood out as making bisexuality more confusing than it actually is. Than, in fact, it should be. Or continue to be in 2014. Three factors that undermine bisexuality are:

1. The idea that female sexuality is utterly mysterious.
2. People not labeling their sexuality at all.
3. Disbelief in bisexuality altogether.”

Read the full article HERE