hms-montrose

Royal Navy Sailor Gives Thumbs Up During Visit to New Orleans (by Defence Images)

A sailor onboard Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Montrose, gives a thumbs up as the ship enters New Orleans, USA.

HMS Montrose was deployed as the Atlantic Patrol Task (South) Ship between October 2011 and May 2012. Her primary role was to protect and promote UK interests in the South Atlantic by maintaining a continuous presence in the region. The ship visited all of the British South Atlantic Overseas Territories during her tour.

Photographer: LA(Phot) James Crawford

HMS Montrose

“Boy’s Own Annual” - (1923-1924).
Badges Of Some Of His Majesty’s Ships

The first HMS Montrose was one of eight Admiralty-type destroyer leaders, sometimes known as the Scott class. They were named after figures from Scottish history and were ordered under the Wartime Emergency Construction Programme.

She was laid down at Hebburn-on-Tyne on 17 September 1917, launched in June 1918, Home Fleet from 1930 to 1932,  1939 she was made leader of the 17th Destroyer Flotilla, stationed with the Western Approaches Command, and for the first few months back in active service was tasked with anti-submarine patrols in the East Atlantic.

27 May 1940 assisted in the legendary Evacuation of Dunkirk, escorted convoys to North Russia before resuming coastal patrols off Britain, also covering east coast convoys. Her last action of the war came about supporting the Normandy Landings. Decommissioned and scrapped in 1946.

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Top: A crew member is excited to be home again; 2nd row left: HMS Montrose arrives in Procedure Alpha, where the ship’s company line the upper deck in their best uniform; middle: The Band of HM Royal Marines, Plymouth, plays whilst waiting for the ship to dock; right: The crew received a hero’s welcome from over 650 overjoyed, cheering and banner-waving family and friends waiting on the jetty; and bottom: A crew member spots her waiting family in the crowd on the jetty [Pictures: Petty Officer Airman (Photographer) Ray Jones and Leading Airman (Photographer) Alex Knott, Crown copyright]

Royal Navy warship HMS Montrose was given a rapturous welcome when she returned home to Plymouth yesterday, 12 March.
 
After successful operations including supporting Operation Recsyr, the international effort to remove chemicals from Syria, the frigate sailed into Her Majesty’s Naval Base Devonport to a heroes’ welcome from over 500 family members and friends.
 
Read more: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/royal-navy-warship-welcomed-home-from-operations–7

Gran Bretaña mantiene su postura de provocación

Por el Embajador Roberto Garcia Moritan

El Reino Unido se encuentra desplazando a Malvinas uno de los buques de superficie principales de su armada. Se trata de la fragata HMS Montrose, con armamento de última generación de guerra electrónica, sensores y equipos de comunicaciones sensibles con apoyo satelital e inclusive con misiles de lanzamiento vertical Sea Wolf y. entre otros, con la posibilidad de contar con armas nucleares tácticas. Mas…

Baltic exercise is an annual event held in the Baltic Sea and was first conducted in 1971. It brings together the navies of 14 NATO and non NATO countries for a 10 ten day workout that covers more than 100 serials. Hosted by the US Navy, 30 ships are participating as well as more than 50 aircraft. Pictured is FGS Hamburg passing alongside HMS Montrose for a ceremonial salute during Ex BALTOPS 2014.

HMS Montrose heads home after taking part in the operation to remove chemicals from Syria [Picture: Crown copyright]

Naval ship HMS Montrose has set sail to come home after handing over duties to HMS Diamond in the mission to remove chemicals from Syria.
 
Since arriving in the eastern Mediterranean in January, HMS Montrose has been working alongside warships from Denmark and Norway carrying out maritime escort and protection duties for 2 merchant vessels that are transporting chemicals from Syria for onward destruction.
 
Read more: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/hms-montrose-begins-journey-home

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Top: A Eurasian Hoopoe on a flying visit to HMS Echo in Indian Ocean; 2nd row left: The crane found on the flight deck of HMS Montrose; middle: Monty the Kestrel found resting on the upperdeck of HMS Montrose; right: The playful antics of a humpback whale observed from the deck of HMS Echo in Indian Ocean; 3rd row: Monty the Kestrel found resting on the upperdeck of HMS Montrose; 4th row left: A long way from home - a grasshopper comes to rest on board HMS Echo in Indian Ocean; right: An African Sacred Ibis and Eurasian Spoonbill take a breather on board HMS Echo in the Indian Ocean; Bottom left: One of many dragonflies found Zipping around on the upperdeck of HMS Montrose and right: A brightly coloured dragonfly takes a momentary respite on board HMS Echo in the Indian Ocean [Pictures: Leading Airman (Photographer) Alex Knott (onboard HMS Montrose)/All Crown copyright]
 
Currently operating in the Gulf region representing the UK’s interests and deterring illegal activity on the high seas, HMS Montrose recently found herself in a more conservational role, inadvertently providing a haven for several feathered aviators embarked for refuelling and maintenance.
 
Visitors included a kestrel (instantly named ‘Monty’ by the Ship’s Company) found resting on the Port bridge wing by the Quartermaster, a common Eurasian crane (imaginatively named 'Craney’) who took a shining to the flight deck, several crickets, and dozens of dragonflies on the bridge wings.
 
Meanwhile, Royal Naval survey ship HMS Echo – on an 18-month mission to improve Admiralty Charts using a hi-tech sonar – became a temporary host to exotic wildlife whilst on patrol in the Indian Ocean. Members of the ship’s crew captured images of insects and birds found resting on the ship’s ropes and decks.
 
An African Sacred Ibis, a Eurasian Spoonbill and a Eurasian Hoopoe – along with numerous species of a large grasshopper and dragonfly took brief refuge onboard, whilst about 150 miles off the Horn of Africa in poorly charted waters.

HMS Montrose Surrounded by Ice Floes in the Antarctic (by Defence Images)

Royal Navy Type 23 frigate HMS Montrose is pictured navigating through a hazardous iceberg field in the Antarctic.

HMS Montrose was deployed as the Atlantic Patrol Task (South) Ship between October 2011 and May 2012. Her primary role was to protect and promote interests in the South Atlantic by maintaining a continuous presence in the region. The ship visited all of the British South Atlantic Overseas Territories during her tour.

Photographer: LA(Phot) James Crawford

Type 23 frigate HMS Montrose in the Mediterranean (library image) [Picture: Leading Airman (Photographer) Joel Rouse, Crown copyright]

The Royal Navy frigate is assisting in the international effort to remove chemical stocks from Syria to stop them being used in weapons.
 
The Devonport-based Type 23 frigate will work alongside Danish, Norwegian, Russian and Chinese warships in the eastern Mediterranean to provide maritime force protection in support of the Danish and Norwegian merchant vessels tasked with transporting industrial-grade chemicals out of Syria for destruction.
 
Read more: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/hms-montrose-to-assist-in-removal-of-chemical-stocks-from-syria

Members of HMS Montrose’s boarding team have been honing their fast-rope boarding skills during some vital training in the Gulf.
 
Described as ‘falling with style, guided by a rope’, members of the team made the exciting and speedy descent from the ship’s Lynx Mk8 helicopter onto Montrose’s flight deck, simulating the drills needed to land on a suspect vessel.

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Top: Seaman Specialists working the Aft Dump Area whilst fuel is pumped across from US Naval Ship Alan Shepherd; 2nd row: 3-metre waves wash the deck of HMS Montrose during the RAS with US Naval Ship Alan Shepherd; 3rd row: Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessel Fort Austin alongside Royal Navy frigate HMS Montrose; Bottom left: A line is fired across to US Naval Ship Alan Shepard at the start of the RAS and right: One of the 33 pallets of stores transferred to Royal Navy frigate HMS Montrose during the RAS [Picture: Leading Airman (Photographer) Alex Knott, Crown Copyright]

Battling rolling 3-metre waves and 25-knot winds Royal Navy frigate HMS Montrose has set a new record for carrying out a full restock of stores in just 2 days to continue her mission in the Gulf.

The replenishment at sea (RAS) involved the transfer of ammunition, stores, food, mail and fuel from ship to ship whilst keeping a straight course with roughly 50 metres of boiling sea between them.

Montrose’s 815 Naval Air Squadron Lynx Mk8 helicopter was also used in a vertical replenishment, ferrying personnel and lighter stores back and forth between the RAS ships, Royal Fleet Auxiliary vessel Fort Austin and the US Naval Ship Alan Shepard.

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Top: HMS Montrose rafted up alongside Royal Fleet Auxiliary Diligence in open waters; 2nd row left: HMS Montrose’s anchor cable is connected to a towline from RFA Diligence; right: The 4,800 tonne HMS Montrose rafted up alongside the 12,500 tonne RFA Diligence and Bottom: Members of the crew haul on the ropes [Picture: Leading Airman (Photographer) Alex Knott, Crown Copyright]

A recent training exercise involving HMS Montrose and Royal Fleet Auxiliary (RFA) Diligence saw the Royal Navy warship being taken under tow, which involved attaching Montrose’s anchor cable to a towline.
 
HMS Montrose had assumed the role of a casualty ship which had suffered major damage in a collision with a merchant vessel. A team of expert salvage engineers from the MOD’s Salvage and Maritime Operations Team onboard RFA Diligence transferred to Montrose to advise what work was needed to repair the stricken ship.
 
Whilst alongside, Diligence provided Montrose with essential electrical power, fuel, pressurised air needed for operating onboard machinery, high pressure salt water for the fire mains and – vital in the Gulf - chilled air for keeping electronic equipment cool.
 
Once she had been restored to health, Montrose parted company with RFA Diligence to continue her real-life maritime security operations.