A Tampon-Like HIV Prevention Method for Women?

So this is really cool: New research shows that tiny water-soluble electrospun fibers can quickly dissolve and deliver an antiretroviral to the vagina. They act as pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV and can act in as little as six minutes. Scientists say the cloth could also be used for various bacterial, fungal and other viral infections.

Photo: Medical News Today

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The National Gay Blood Drive, coming to a city near you…

You guys!!!

Did you know that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) continues to ban gay and bisexual men from donating blood, even though we’re now able to test blood for HIV in a few hours?! Well, they do.

On July 11 (this Friday!!), the National Gay Blood Drive will protest this ban by having gay and bisexual men bring allies to donate in their place. 

Learn more on National Gay Blood Drive’s Website and Facebook!

This is important work! Show your support!

xo, 
K&D

Researchers eliminate HIV from cultured human cells for first time

HIV-1, the most common type of the virus that causes AIDS,has proved to be tenacious, inserting its genome permanently into its victims’ DNA, forcing patients to take a lifelong drug regimen to control the virus and prevent a fresh attack. Now, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers has designed a way to snip out the integrated HIV-1 genes for good.

"This is one important step on the path toward a permanent cure for AIDS," says Kamel Khalili, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Neuroscience at Temple. Khalili and his colleague, Wenhui Hu, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Neuroscience at Temple, led the work which marks the first successful attempt to eliminate latent HIV-1 virus from human cells. "It’s an exciting discovery, but it’s not yet ready to go into the clinic. It’s a proof of concept that we’re moving in the right direction," added Dr. Khalili, who is also Director of the Center for Neurovirology and Director of the Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center at Temple.

In a study published July 21 by theProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Khalili and colleagues detail how they created molecular tools to delete the HIV-1 proviral DNA. When deployed, a combination of a DNA-snipping enzyme called a nuclease and a targeting strand of RNA called a guide RNA (gRNA) hunt down the viral genome and excise the HIV-1 DNA. From there, the cell’s gene repair machinery takes over, soldering the loose ends of the genome back together — resulting in virus-free cells.

"Since HIV-1 is never cleared by the immune system, removal of the virus is required in order to cure the disease," says Khalili, whose research focuses on the neuropathogenesis of viral infections. The same technique could theoretically be used against a variety of viruses, he says.

Continue Reading.

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What ‘The Golden Girls’ Taught Us About AIDS" via Barbara Fletcher

"But this is what The Golden Girls was so good at: bringing home those topics that often made people uncomfortable — racism, homosexuality, older female sexuality, sexual harassment, the homeless, addiction, marriage equality and more — and showing us how interconnected and utterly human we all are at any age. Served, of course, with that delicious trademark humor that infused the show throughout its groundbreaking, taboo-busting seven-season run.”

A very sad news:

Mississippi Child Thought Cured Of HIV Shows Signs Of Infection

A baby who generated great excitement last year because it appeared she had been cured of HIV is infected with the virus after all, health officials say. The news from Mississippi generated a lot of optimism. But Dr. Hannah Gay, who had treated the baby at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, remained on the lookout for HIV infection. “Ever since we discovered this case in 2012, we’ve known that was a possibility,” she said in a conference call yesterday.

The baby was not put back on anti-HIV drugs, but doctors kept checking her for signs of infection every six to eight weeks. More than two years elapsed with no sign of the virus.
"So, last week was one of those regularly scheduled visits," Gay said. "The child came; she had no abnormalities on physical exam." But blood tests showed that the baby had an active HIV infection. The virus had emerged from some mysterious hiding place in her body.

Read more (via npr.org)

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An Australian biotech firm has developed a gel for condoms that fights sexually transmitted diseases, proven effective in killing 99.9% of viruses

A condom that can kill off most sexually transmitted viruses, including HIV, herpes and HPV is one step closer to coming to market.

The condom, which will be manufactured by Australian prophylactic company, Ansell, is laced with VivaGel lubricant – a unique antimicrobial agent developed by Starpharma, an Australian bio-tech firm. The solution has been shown to inactivate up to 99.9% of viruses including the viruses that commonly cause sexually transmitted infections.

http://www.psfk.com/2014/07/condoms-gel-kill-std-market.html#!bleBXD

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Why it matters that the world’s biggest Vine star is a homophobic, teenage jerk

While Nash Grier may think that his apology will make the whole “mistake” go away, these types of incidents can have lasting consequences. Due to this Bieber-of-the-Vine’s miraculous number of followers alone, such videos — seen by masses of impressionable young people — help create a world of harm by perpetuating false information about the still widely-misunderstood problem of HIV/AIDS. 

Read more | Follow micdotcom

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Researchers successfully eliminate HIV virus from cultured human cells

The HIV-1 virus has proved to be tenacious, inserting its genome permanently into its victims’ DNA, forcing patients to take a lifelong drug regimen to control the virus and prevent a fresh attack. Now, a team of Temple University School of Medicine researchers has designed a way to snip out the integrated HIV-1 genes for good.

 ”This is one important step on the path toward a permanent cure for AIDS,” said Kamel Khalili, PhD, Professor and Chair of the Department of Neuroscience at Temple. Dr. Khalili and his colleague, Wenhui Hu, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Neuroscience at Temple, led the work which marks the first successful attempt to eliminate latent HIV-1 virus from human cells. “It’s an exciting discovery, but it’s not yet ready to go into the clinic. It’s a proof of concept that we’re moving in the right direction,” added Dr. Khalili, who is also Director of the Center for Neurovirology and Director of the Comprehensive NeuroAIDS Center at Temple.

Read more

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'Although antiretroviral drugs were available in the States and throughout Europe they were nonexistent in Africa at that time. The cost of medicine and the surrounding treatment were price prohibitive in countries where the majority of people live off $2 a day.

While documenting this crisis I chose to focus on the stories of individuals. The scope of the pandemic was too widespread. My images exist as a record of people I met who lost their lives to AIDS, as a reminder that countless others seek access to life saving drugs and that children orphaned by the disease need our help.’

-Kristen Ashburn, winner of the Getty Images Grant for Editorial Photography 2006 for her project Bloodline.

2014 marks the ten year anniversary of the Getty Images Grants for Editorial Photography program, which has now awarded almost $1 million in funding to photojournalists. As we prepare to announce this year’s winners on September 4 at Visa Pour l’Image, we are taking a look back at some of the winners from the past 10 years. See more on In Focus.

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