nordicsassenach asked:

I remeber when I was old enough to start shaving my legs, my gran use to make me oil infusions instead of soap. She's gone now, and the recipe With her. I love the scent of Lilacs, Verbana and Lavender and would love to make an oil infusion out of them for shaving, or just body oil...I Guess my question is, do you boil the oil first? and which oil in Your opinion would be wise to use?

Absolutely no boiling the oil. Getting an oil to boiling point means you’ve basically made a siege weapon in your kitchen. Spoiler alert: this is not a good idea. Just follow the guide I (or any other of our talented tumblr witches) posted and you’ll be fine.
The thing you might want to boil is the jar or bottle you plan to use. I’ve put a tutorial on that too, it’s all on my wordpress.

For cosmetic purposes, my favourite is 50/50 olive and grapeseed oil mix, because there’s benefits of both oils and you don’t smell like pizza.

Calling All Witches!

I’m looking for more witchy blogs to follow, i’m feeling very close to the Goddesses/ Gods at the moment! so please reblog if you post:

Wicca

Witchcraft

Herbal remedies

Divination

spells/spell craft


p.s: I’d also love to make some more friends who share my beliefs so please send me an ask i’d love to get to know you!!!

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Moss of the Woods Botanical Jewelry

Unique jewelry for the avid nature nerd! At Moss of the Woods, we strive to create wearable art that celebrates the beauty and complexity of the natural world. Resin pendants with preserved botanical specimens recalling vintage museums and herbariums.

All of my handmade resin pendants contain sustainably collected specimens from the local New England forests. Every piece has a story.

etsy

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Despite being commonly known, Chamomile is not just a benign little flower that tastes sweet in your cup, it packs a powerful medicinal punch. Chamomile should not be thought of in terms of what specific diseases it can be used for, because there are too many uses to list, nor is is helpful to only think of what herbs can ‘do’. After reading though my favorite herb books, I summarize the actions of chamomile as being:

  • Relaxing nervine for states of tension
  • Aromatic and bitter for regulating digestion
  • Anti-inflammatory and anti-allergy
  • Anti-microbial
  • Safe, tasty and suitable for everyone, including babies, children, pregnant women and the elderly
  • Matthew Wood says that “The fresh preparations preserve the oils, so they are more relaxing, the dried preparations are bitter and promote secretions to the stomach, G.I. and liver.”

Here are some of the chemical constituents present in chamomile and their generalized actions (mostly from Wood, but also from Simon Mills, David Hoffmann and Chanchal Cabrerra)

  • Flavanoids –  cooling and relaxing
  • Bitter sesquiterpene lactones – stimulate digestive juices
  • Volatile oils –  antipyretic, anti-spasmodic, can reduce histamine-induced inflammation
  • Mucilage – soothing, nutritious and immuno-stimulating
  • Amino acids, fatty acids and many more

“Beneath the surface of the land lies the bone memory of all living things that died and were absorbed into the earth. Memory is retained in the mineral composition, the plants absorb minerals through their roots. This makes them vessels through which Shadow can be tapped and used by the Witch. In the Rose and Thorn Path, plant spirits are evoked in order to communicate with Shadow. The collective memory of all Witches who came before us resides in Shadow and is a vast source upon which to draw from the ancestors. It’s through an established rapport with plant spirits that this becomes accessible to the Witch.”

- Raven Grimassi
Grimoire of the Thorn-Blooded Witch: Mastering the Five Arts of Old World Witchery
http://amzn.to/1u5VYGd

Image Credit: Anthony Palumbo

ingredients for test batch; Deep Healing Balm ♡

(from left to right) organic: beeswax, homegrown sage, wild-harvested yarrow leaves, olive oil, wild-harvested labrador tea leaves, calendula flowers from my garden, wild-harvested devils club, lavender flowers from the garden, wild-harvested juniper berries, homegrown catnip, hairy arnica flowers, homegrown sprig of rosemary

Follow @mistyislelady on instagram for more

Aloe Vera Can -

  1. Remove Makeup. Aloe Vera is a cooling agent that helps calm the skin.
  2. Hair Conditioner. Massage in a small amount of Aloe Vera gel and leave it on for about 2 minutes. Rinse it off.
  3. Add to your shampoo. It will make your hair shiny.
  4. Treat Acne.  Aloe Vera minimizes inflammation and treats acne due to its inflammatory properties.
  5. Prevent and eliminate  stretch marks due to Aloe Vera’s regenerative properties.
  6. Treat swollen Gums.  Aloe vera soothes swollen gums and maximizes your body’s defense mechanisms. You can apply Aloe Vera to the infected area.
  7. Increase hair growth. Aloe Vera contains an enzyme that helps increase hair growth.
  8. Strengthen your nails.
  9. Treat herpes, eczema, psoriasis,  dermatitis and other skin allergies. Aloe Vera is able to penetrate multiple skin layers.
  10. Use as a skin moisturizer. It strengthens skin tissue by providing oxygen to the cells.
  11. Heal sunburns due to Aloe Vera’s antiseptic properties.
  12. Shaving gel. It gives you a nice smooth surface.
  13. Fight the flu and colds. Aloe Vera  contains a great amount of natural ingredients such as vitamins, minerals, amino acids and enzymes that boost the immune system.
  14. Ease menstrual cramps (by drinking Aloe Vera juice). It reduces pain and fatigue.
  15. Personal Lubricant. It is a very effective moisturizer.

Herbal Medicine: What is an Electuary?

An Electuary is a medicinal paste created with something sweet, such as honey or jam. Thick electuaries can be rolled into little balls for children to take with some juice, and thinner electuaries can be mixed with beverages such as hot tea. At its essence, an electuary is an herb infused honey.

According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary the first known use of an Electuary dates back to the 14th century. ‘Electuarie’ is a Middle English word derived most likely from the Greek ‘Ekleikton’ or ‘Ekleichein’ meaning to lick up. After all, a spoon full of sugar helps the medicine go down, am I right? ;-)

The common kitchen witch (and herbalist) will already be familiar with the process of herbal infusions, such as making tea blends, but making and storing electuaries can really kick your magic crafting up a notch. The primary use is medicinal but you can expand this into everyday spellcraft as well. Below are just a few examples of both medicinal and magical electuaries and how to create them.

Medicinal

Chamomile – Mildly sedative and soothing for stress relief.

Mint – Soothes digestive track to help with heartburn, nausea, and indigestion.

Raspberry Leaf – Especially beneficial for women by balancing hormones and helping with painful menses.

Elderberry, Echinacea, Licorice Root – This blend is a good immune supporter and very helpful for viral respiratory infections and treating the symptoms accompanied by the flu.

Magical (individual ingredients or blend to your tastes)

Love – Rose Petals, Lavender Flowers, Lemon Verbena, Apple, Cardamom

Money – Cinnamon, Clove, Nutmeg, Almond, Orange

Protection – Anise, Elder Flower, Fennel, Basil, Blackberry

Purification – Rosemary, Bay, Lemon, Chamomile, Nettle, Turmeric

How to make an Electuary

The best results come from using dried herbs or flowers and local raw honey. The dried plant material allows you to store your electuary longer because it has little to no water in it, where fresh plant material will thin the honey and require refrigeration to prevent mold. Raw honey from your local area is also best because it will contain traces of pollen from the trees and flowers in your area which assist with preventing seasonal allergies.

The process is to create a double-boiler system by putting a pot with some water on to boil, then placing a slightly larger metal bowl in it so that it sits snuggly (but not too tight) without touching the water. The gentle steam will warm the metal bowl enough to melt your honey without boiling it directly. Once your double-boiler is assembled put in your desired amount of honey and dried plant material. You can use herbs from your kitchen, ground spices, dried flowers, etc. I would recommend finding food grade if you’re buying online or at a local shop. Organic would be the best of course (pesticides don’t make good electuaries!). The amount of honey to plant material is up to you depending on how strong you want the infusion to be. Let your plant material simmer for an hour in the honey over your double-boiler.

*Alternative* You could infuse your honey and herbs using a small crock pot if you wanted to so you could simmer for 2-3 hours.

If you want your electuary to be a thick paste, finely grind your herbs prior to infusing using a spice grinder (or mortar and pestle if you have that kind of patience). Alternatively you could just use store bought ground herbs/spices. You will want to use more of an equal ratio of plant material to honey to make sure it stays thick. Please note that this will make the honey taste strongly of the herbs you use so be mindful of taste when you’re choosing herbs to blend, or just plan to roll into more of a “plant pill” to be swallowed. After infusing, store in a clean dry jar with a lid.

If you prefer a thinner electuary that can be mixed by the spoonful with a cup of hot water or tea, then you can use any kind of plant material in any amount you’d like with your honey to control strength and flavor. After infusing, strain it into a clean dry jar with lid for storage. Straining a combination of leaves, roots, bark, and ground spices will allow the smaller particles to stay within the electuary while removing the larger more undesirable pieces. This seems to be the most popular method.

You can now use your electuary however you’d like! Medicinal, Magical, with tea, in your cooking, the possibilities are endless so experiment!

Brightest Blessings,

Thalya /|\