A Closer Look at Climate

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This week’s permaculture class focused on climate. Jay, our capitan and fearless leader, shared an incredible resource: The National Audobon Society's Field Guide to Weather in North America. Fascinating and beautiful, this book covers everything from wind flow and cloud formation to natural light phenomena – like Aurora Borealis (pictured above). It's not hard to see why these field guides are highly coveted and collected. With so many evolving factors affecting our environment, re-learning some of the science lessons of our formative years and diving a little deeper is a very wise idea. Now if only we could gain a little extra space on the hard drive to retain all this mind-boggling symmetry. Neuroscientists in the crowd, any solutions to enlarging grey matter?

We work through the issues close to home, too, in the Urban Permaculture Design Course. Like why the wind tunnels (i.e. Fell and Oak streets) continue their vendetta against us between 4–7 p.m. every day. And what it feels like to be in a vortex (a little volatile, I must say).

Join us next Sunday as we continue to make sense of this beautiful planet and how we might work with design to improve our interaction and effect on it. 

Written by Natasha Blum
Photo cred: Flickr user WhatiMom

What is an Urban Farm?

At first glance, a farm is a big space where food is grown, so, an urban farm might be a big space in a city where food is grown. That has seemed to be the generally accepted definition. The 2.2 acre vacant former freeway fit that description well enough, and many were quite excited when the idea of a farm in Hayes Valley was first proposed.

Since 2010, as Hayes Valley Farm has continued to grow, our understanding of what an Urban Farm could be has also grown. Here are some of the elements that currently make up our Urban Farm.

Read more on the Hayes Valley Farm Blog »

Watch on hayesvalleyfarm.tumblr.com

It’s Not What I Expected. by edibleoffice on Flickr.

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