haudenosaunee

6

Rhymes for Young Ghouls, featuring Mohawk actress Kawennahere Devery Jacobs, is now streaming on Netflix!

From IMDB:

Red Crow Mi’g Maq reservation, 1976: By government decree, every Indian child under the age of 16 must attend residential school. In the kingdom of the Crow, that meansimprisonment at St. Dymphna’s. That means being at the mercy of “Popper”, the sadistic Indian agent who runs the school.

Jigonhsasee

Art by Z Akhmetova (tumblr)

The Haudenosaunee or Iroquois Confederacy united the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Seneca nations.  The exact date on which the Haudenosaunee was founded is unknown, but is believed to be somewhere between 1100 and 1600.  The sixth and final nation of the Haudenosaunee, the Tuscarora, joined in 1722.

The Haudenosaunee was the brainchild of two men, Dekanawida (The Great Peacemaker) and Hiawatha, who brought the Great Law of Peace to the squabbling Iroquoian nations.  They were joined by Jigonhsasee, a woman known for her ability to use hospitality to settle disputes between tribes.  Dekanawida persuaded her to support the idea of a confederacy of nations and gave her the responsibility of selecting men to sit on the peace council.  Dekanawida called Jigonhsasee “Mother of Nations.”  Throughout the history of the Haudenosaunee women have retained the right to elect and recall men to the council, as well as the right to veto a declaration of war.  

 The Six Nations: Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) included the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, Senecas and the Tuscaroras (who joined later on). Together they comprise the oldest living participatory democracy on earth, practiced by the Six Nations for over 800 hundred years. It is well documented that the authors of “today’s” constitution, such as Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, “modeled” it after the Six Nations.

-  photo above: Alan Michelson 

below: The Hiawatha Belt

A symbol of the agreement between the five original Haudenosaunee nations and their promise to live in unity and stand by one another in times of trouble.  The four white squares stand for the Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga and Seneca nations.  The Onondaga, as the keepers of the council fire, are represented at the center of the pattern by the white tree of peace.   The lines extending out from the Seneca and Mohawk squares on either side of the belt stand for a path which other nations may follow if they agree to live in peace or wish to join the Confederacy.  

Archaeologist reveals sustainable practices of the Haudenosaunee

image

Every longhouse hearth – every reworked brass kettle and fractured deer bone unearthed by Cornell archaeologist Kurt Jordan and his student diggers in 18th century Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) villages – tells a very different story.

At one time, mainstream scholars of pre-Revolutionary War Iroquoia saw the disease-diminished and war-weakened “people of the longhouse” fumbling through an epoch of social turmoil and decline. Jordan, his colleagues and their archaeological evidence just might be changing history.

"I see an active, engaged, re-energized people building a reasonably sustainable, localized economy in the face of tremendous pressure from European empires and Native rivals," says Jordan, associate professor of anthropology and American Indian studies. Read more.

The European invaders, from the first, attempted to claim Indians as their subjects. Where the Indian people resisted, as in the case of the Hau de no sau nee, the Europeans rationalized that resistance to be an incapacity for civilization. The incapacity for civilization rationale became the basis for the phenomenon in the West which is known today as racism.

The Europeans landed on the shores of the Americas and immediately claimed the territories for their sovereigns. They then attempted, especially in the case of France and Spain, to make peasants of the Indians. The English, who had already experimented with the enclosure system and who thus colonized North America with landless peasants which were driven by a desperation rooted in their own history, at first simply drove the Indians off the land by force.

The European legal systems had, and apparently have developed, no machinery to recognize the rights of peoples, other than dictators or sovereigns, to land. When the Europeans came to North America, they attempted to simply make vassals of the Native leaders. When that failed, they resorted to other means. The essential thrust of European powers has been an attempt to convert “… the Indian person from membership in an unassimilable caste to membership in a social class integrated into Euro-American institutions.” (Francis Jennings, “The Invasion of America”, 1976)

—  Basic Call to Consciousness
Watch on marasei.tumblr.com

The Shack

A short film by Kaniehtiio Horn that was screened at Imagine Native last year.  Hilarious.

Kaniehtiio Horn is a Mohawk actor originally from Kahnawake, her most recent work includes Assassins Creed III, Defiance and Hemlock Grove.

"FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (please forward): Individuals from Six Nations and their allies have interrupted work on a section of Enbridge’s Line 9 pipeline. The work stoppage began around 10am this morning. Individuals involved asked workers to leave, asserting that the land is Haudenosaunee territory guaranteed under the Haldimand deed, and that Enbridge’s workers were present without consent or consultation. 

“Meaningful consultation isn’t just providing information and going ahead without discussion – it’s giving the opportunity to say no and having a willingness to accommodate.” says Missy Elliot.

“Enbridge left a voice message on a machine with one person. That’s not meaningful – it’s not even consultation.” Emilie Corbeau, there in support of Six Nations points out. 

Those involved intend to host an action camp, filling the time with teach-ins about Six Nations history, indigenous solidarity and skill shares centering on direct action.

The group states that they’ve tried the other processes available to them and here out of necessity. “We’ve tried pursuing avenues with the NEB, the township and the Grand River Conservation Authority. Our concerns were dismissed. What other choice do we have if we want to protect our land, water and children?” Missy Elliot of Six Nations asks.

Under bill C-45 the section of the Grand River adjacent to the Enbridge work site and pipeline is no longer protected. Approximately half a million people rely on drinking water provided by the Grand River.

“This isn’t just about line 9 – or Northern Gateway, Energy East or Keystone XL. This is about pipelines – all of them.” Daniell Boissineau, of Turtle Clan, asserts. “This is about the tarsands and how destructive they are to expand, extract and transport.”

“This is a continental concern. It’s not just a Six Nations issue or an indigenous issue. We share the responsibility to protect our land and water as human beings.” Elliot states.”

via Swamp Line 9 on Facebook

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (please forward): Individuals from Six Nations and their allies have interrupted work on a section of Enbridge’s Line 9 pipeline. The work stoppage began around 10am this morning. Individuals involved asked workers to leave, asserting that the land is Haudenosaunee territory guaranteed under the Haldimand deed, and that Enbridge’s workers were present without consent or consultation. 

“Meaningful consultation isn’t just providing information and going ahead without discussion – it’s giving the opportunity to say no and having a willingness to accommodate.” says Missy Elliot.

“Enbridge left a voice message on a machine with one person. That’s not meaningful – it’s not even consultation.” Emilie Corbeau, there in support of Six Nations points out. 

Those involved intend to host an action camp, filling the time with teach-ins about Six Nations history, indigenous solidarity and skill shares centering on direct action.

This is the flag of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois). It represents a confederacy of six Native American nations (Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga, Cayuga, Tuscarora and Seneca) and was a great influence on the founding fathers when drawing up the constitution. They remain as the oldest participatory democracy on Earth and they won’t be loosing that title anytime soon… #haudenosaunee #iroquois #nativeamerican #independence #july4th #iroquois #independenceday #usa #democracy

The Oneidas for Democracy are the Oneida People, who peacefully uphold the traditional values of the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois Confederacy). The Onyota’a:ka - “People of the Standing Stone” have endured many hardships over the past few generations as they have struggled to maintain their status as Haudenosaunee. They have overcome great odds to return to their ancestral lands. Their inherent right to live in peace within Oneida Territory is rapidly being stripped away from them by the current leadership of the Oneida Nation of New York.

Paper Iroquois (Haudenosaunee) longhouse, image via Alina’s Adventures.  The project is from Easy Make & Learn Projects: Northeast Indians (Grades 3-5) and a pdf of the longhouse can be found here.

A longhouse was a narrow rectangular building which housed a large extended family or clan.  Clans were matrilineal.  When an Iroquois man married, he moved into the longhouse of his wife.  Her clan membership was passed on to their children.  The head of each longhouse was a woman, usually the oldest woman.  These clan mothers oversaw farming, managed the distribution of food, and were responsible for ceremonial preparations.  They also selected the men who represented the clan at tribal council and appointed the chief.