grzymala

Invading space

beautiful tape installation from berlin-based artist monika grzymala …more akin to drawing than installation, viewing the works as complex drawings that leave the walls to take over the surrounding space… …with each piece requiring a huge physical effort to create. “Whenever I leave a work, I feel as if I leave a part of me, a part of my body behind,” she says… Sun K. Kwak Invade the space … with the fabric. Carlie Trosclair creates atypical plants with the fabric she needed space. Coming out of a hole in the wall or frozen in hybrid forms, the fabric used by Carlie Trosclair seems Always come to life and turn into an indescribable strange creature. By playing on the overlays and aging materials, the fabric seems to become a living organism teeming in our old houses. Because of my interest in installations I am continually influenced and drawn to the work of artists who use the idea of intersection. Most commonly by intersecting with walls floors and objects. 

Frozen Explosion 

Dealing with the themes of decay, failure and the robust vs the dainty, due to the fragmented structure juxtaposing with bulky stone and wood.

Nancy Cohen

Estuary: moods and modes (detail), 2007. handmade paper, marsh grasses, salt, wire, handmade abaca paper; assembled.

Water is vital for all life on Earth, and the protection of water resources has become a cornerstone of the environmental movement. Estuary: Moods and Modes reflects the artist’s study of the New Jersey Pine Barrens ecosystem—a million-acre tract of largely undeveloped land in the nation’s most densely populated state. The undulating swirls of delicately colored, handmade abaca paper evoke the ebb and flow of water courses, differing concentrations of salinity, and the shifting boundaries between water and land. The artist states that in this work, as in our own lives, “elements hang in balance, each one necessary, vulnerable, beautiful, and above all interdependent.”

Carlie Trosclair

Cascade, 2010. fabric.

Invading the space … with the fabric. Carlie Trosclair creates atypical plant/natural forms. Coming out of a hole in the wall or frozen in hybrid forms, the fabric used by Carlie Trosclair seems to come to life and turn into an indescribably strange creature. By playing on the overlays and ageing materials, the fabric seems to become a living organism teeming in our old houses.

Nari Ward

Hunger Cradle (1996)

Is a psychologically charged installation made with yarn and discarded objects that literally engulfs the viewer. The focus is on the unconscious, on the esoteric, on hidden drives and repressed fears. For the exhibition, “Dream and Trauma”, Vienna. Wards a web-like, woven structure, that can be taken as a visual metaphor of our labyrinthine or inner world, was symbolically positioned in a narrow corridor which entered into the main exhibition spaces. By rendering access to the exhibition difficult, the idea that the exhibition’s curators, Edelbert Kob from MUMOK along with Gerald Matt and Angela Stief from Vienna’s Kunsthalle, had was to underline the inaccessibility of the unconscious.

Sun K. Kwak

New York-based Korean artist Sun K. Kwak masterfully redefines a space with her spectacular tape installations. Primarily working with ordinary black masking tape, the artist manages to produce a fluid stream of color that looks like a painting by applying the adhesive strips directly to the walls and floors of a venue and tearing away at it, piece by piece. Each site-specific installation changes the atmosphere of the area it inhabits, or, as the artist astutely puts it: “it’s conducting the energy of the space through line drawing.”

The installation site is comparatively transformed through the application of her illusionary splashes of ink, which is actually made of intricately detailed, stripped, and sliced tape. The artist also allows her creative renderings to weave across three-dimensional planes. Additionally, the black tape against a white wall alternates as both the painterly brushstrokes across the bare surfaces and as the negative space, giving the illusion of white streaks cutting through the room.

Monika Grzymala

These beautiful tape installation from berlin-based artist Monika Gzymala …more akin to drawing than installation, viewing the works as complex drawings that leave the walls to take over the surrounding space… …with each piece requiring a huge physical effort to create. “Whenever I leave a work, I feel as if I leave a part of me, a part of my body behind,” she says…