Coming soon–This summer, The Studio Museum in Harlem presents Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974–1989, the first museum survey of the Los Angeles–based conceptual artist’s early work. On view from July 17–October 29, 2014, the exhibition features seventy-five works from the beginning of a singular career that now spans four decades. 

Several new media initiatives around Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974–1989 build on the Studio Museum’s active and growing presence in the digital realm. In July, the Museum will unveil gaines-gridwork.tumblr.com, an interactive Tumblr page featuring Gaines’s work and ephemera from throughout his career. The site will also showcase other artists inspired by the grid, as well as crowd-sourced exhibition documentation. In addition to the Tumblr, the Museum will moderate a Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974–1989 Facebook group to promote engaging discussion of Gaines’s art and ideas. Visitors are encouraged to take non-flash photography in the exhibition and share their experiences using the hashtag #gridwork.

GIF: Charles Gaines, Faces, Set #10: Terry Allen, 1978

Summer Boredom Blaster: Get Your Feet Wet with Logic Puzzles

In this new series of SOLARO blog entries, we are going to explore some fun, exciting, and easy ways to ensure that students keep learning through the summer.  Over the next few months, SOLARO is going to publish one fun activity per week, taken from our vast pool of resources, which are usually only available to SOLARO subscribers. We believe our content is superior to all other online learning resources on the Internet; therefore, we are so excited to be able to share a little bit with our blog readers.

So stay tuned and get your kids involved in some brain-stimulating activities that are sure to drag them away from the video games. (At least for a while!)

Our SOLARO team has put together a fine assortment of boredom blasters so far this summer, but you’ve probably all been wondering where all the math fun has been hiding. This week, we’re going to show you how to solve GridWorksTM logic puzzles.

These puzzles, along with many other excellent logical reasoning puzzles, can be found at Puzzles.com, and they range from very easy to very difficult. GridWorksTM puzzles each consist of a 3-by-3 grid that needs to be completed using 9 tiles with 3 different shapes coloured yellow, blue, and green.

image

Each puzzle includes clues to help decide which shape goes where. Each clue will give some information about the locations of the shapes. For example, in puzzle 31, there is one clue that gives the location of many of the shapes: 

image

The clue can be copied directly into the grid. The rest of the puzzle can be solved using the simple rule that no shape is duplicated; each of the triangles, Xs, and circles is a different colour.

image

More than one clue can be given for a puzzle. For example, there are five clues given to help solve puzzle 177.

image

In this puzzle, some of the clues could go in a variety of different places on the grid. For example, clue 5 could go in the top left, top right, bottom left, or bottom right.

image

To decide where it needs to go, start with clue 3. Because of its shape, it must go in the top left corner of the puzzle.

image

Now, you can look to see where to put clue 5.

image

It cannot go in the squares at the top left, because square 2 is already yellow, and it cannot be blue as well. For the same reason, clue 5 cannot go in the squares at the top right. It cannot go in the bottom left, because square 4 is already an X, and it cannot also be a circle.

image

The only place to put clue 5 is in the squares at the bottom right.

image



The only clues that are left are 1, 2, and 4. Clue 1 is the same shape as clue 5.

image

It might also go in the same four places in the puzzle as clue 5. Not so fast, though. If you look at what is already there, you can see that it cannot go in the top right, because then the green triangle would have to go in square 2, which must contain a yellow shape.

image

It cannot go in the bottom left, because the triangles would have to go in squares 4 and 5, which already contain an X and a circle, respectively.

image

It cannot go in the bottom right because the green triangle would go in square 5, which already has a circle in it.

image

The only place it can go is the top left.

image

This leaves clues 2 and 4.

image

image

These are some simple guidelines to get you started. Try puzzles 1–4, 6, 9, 10, 13, 15, 21, and 27 for some practice using these techniques. As you go through the website, you will probably notice that some clues are given on a blue background. These are negative clues, and our next blog will go over how to use those. You can also read more about negative clues and clues that rotate or reflect on the Clue Example page and the Extensions page. Good luck!

Images based on Gridworks puzzle images.

anonymous said:

Gridwork: Muse is trapped in an electronic device of anon's choosing for three days-- a device that's glitching, and their darker side may make an appearance.

"Where am I? What is going on here?"
// looks around and sighs confused//

Word to Help You Go General

Hello, again, fellow LoA-ers!

Sorry I have been absent for so long, but I figured it was time to catch up with all of you :)

I have a list of things that have manifested that you can most often hear about in my “personal” blog. I get so excited when I get the manifestations I completely forget about signing in to this account! hahaaa

Anyways, I thought that I should share some phrases and words that Abraham Hicks offers often in their videos to us. I often find them helpful and once I hear AH get started I tend to go off on my own tangent.

Please use them if you feel they apply or could be helpful for you. Also, I did a bit of gridwork on the words section and felt a whole lot better after doing it (it took me 2 minutes of light focus). Can you guess what the topics of inspiration were?

What words do you use to get into the Vortex?

Phrases:

“I don’t have to think about that right now.”

“Maybe I can do something else.”

“My thoughts are going upstream, perhaps there is another word I can use to go downstream…”

“My options are as vast as the ocean.”

“I feel _________ and that´s okay for now.”

“Alright, alright, I feel the tension! I can let it run its course!”

“I´m being hard on myself, let me try one word to release…”

“I GIVE IT UP!”

Words:

Ease

> “ It´s easy to…”

Comfortable

Soft

Warm

Gentle

Pure

Light

Enlightened

Bright

Easy

Thoughtless

Connected

Sure

Secure

Knowing

Accepting

At ease

Content

Welcoming

Welcomed

Open

Open ended

Vast

Broad

General

Myself

True

Truthful

Honest

Sincere

Focused

Awareness

Aware

Deep

Profound

Meaningful

Beautiful

Relaxed

Chill

Calm

Cool

Collected

Observant

Appreciative

Appreciating

Appreciated

Reciprocate

Give and take

Flow

Current

Down stream

Go with the flow

Let go of the paddle

Take it all in

Basque in the health

Basque in nature

Alive

Green

Fresh

Breeze

Perfect

Clear
Clarity

Bright

Soothing

Being

Letting it be

Commune

Full

Complete

hawksvane said:

"Someone left a really mysterious box just outside your gate. JARVIS wouldn't let me shoot it."

           “So I’m aware.” Anomalies are what they are. He doesn’t make a habit out of ignoring them, only because he knew the repercussions better than your common adrenalin-spiked risk junkie. There were risks, then there were calculated risks. Slight distinction, but that’s all that it ever took to make a big enough of a difference, oftentimes involving the thin line between life and death. It goes without saying why he abhors one and not the other. Fingertips cast up the illusionary tangibility of a blue-lit screen up for delectation’s sake, displaying the very item described in it’s dim yellow cardboard container. Neatly listed by both sides came factual nonsense of all sorts, from volume calculations to material composites. Though what took the cake was surely the mapped out gridwork of an X-Ray composite image overlaid atop the original, displaying marginally visible contents within. “It’s armed.”

4

perspective & hierarchy

the image’s grid is established by the the infinity drawers forming a prison-like cage receding 22˚ into the background. this single-point-vanishing-perspective draws the eye left to right, but it also establishes extreme polarizing distance between the figure and title in the foreground (positive space) and the drawers in the background (negative space). the contrast of the figure flying out from the perspective creates significant prominence around the foreground imagery, yet the opposing foreground figure is also tied to the background as the angel’s angle of departure aligns with the receding angle of the drawers.

axis

the foreground text and figure is split bilaterally by an off-center axis extending through the figure’s solar plexus and the most prominent letter in the title Brazil, the ‘z’. the axis also falls directly on a vertex established by the vanishing perspective.

proportion & alignment

while the title initially appears superimposed, its framework very nearly echoes the proportions of the figure in the foreground from the tip of his wings to his fists to the beam of his shoulders to the now vacant shelf from whence the angel leapt.

Text
Photo
Quote
Link
Chat
Audio
Video