Coming soon–This summer, The Studio Museum in Harlem presents Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974–1989, the first museum survey of the Los Angeles–based conceptual artist’s early work. On view from July 17–October 29, 2014, the exhibition features seventy-five works from the beginning of a singular career that now spans four decades. 

Several new media initiatives around Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974–1989 build on the Studio Museum’s active and growing presence in the digital realm. In July, the Museum will unveil gaines-gridwork.tumblr.com, an interactive Tumblr page featuring Gaines’s work and ephemera from throughout his career. The site will also showcase other artists inspired by the grid, as well as crowd-sourced exhibition documentation. In addition to the Tumblr, the Museum will moderate a Charles Gaines: Gridwork 1974–1989 Facebook group to promote engaging discussion of Gaines’s art and ideas. Visitors are encouraged to take non-flash photography in the exhibition and share their experiences using the hashtag #gridwork.

GIF: Charles Gaines, Faces, Set #10: Terry Allen, 1978

Summer Boredom Blaster: Get Your Feet Wet with Logic Puzzles

In this new series of SOLARO blog entries, we are going to explore some fun, exciting, and easy ways to ensure that students keep learning through the summer.  Over the next few months, SOLARO is going to publish one fun activity per week, taken from our vast pool of resources, which are usually only available to SOLARO subscribers. We believe our content is superior to all other online learning resources on the Internet; therefore, we are so excited to be able to share a little bit with our blog readers.

So stay tuned and get your kids involved in some brain-stimulating activities that are sure to drag them away from the video games. (At least for a while!)

Our SOLARO team has put together a fine assortment of boredom blasters so far this summer, but you’ve probably all been wondering where all the math fun has been hiding. This week, we’re going to show you how to solve GridWorksTM logic puzzles.

These puzzles, along with many other excellent logical reasoning puzzles, can be found at Puzzles.com, and they range from very easy to very difficult. GridWorksTM puzzles each consist of a 3-by-3 grid that needs to be completed using 9 tiles with 3 different shapes coloured yellow, blue, and green.

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Each puzzle includes clues to help decide which shape goes where. Each clue will give some information about the locations of the shapes. For example, in puzzle 31, there is one clue that gives the location of many of the shapes: 

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The clue can be copied directly into the grid. The rest of the puzzle can be solved using the simple rule that no shape is duplicated; each of the triangles, Xs, and circles is a different colour.

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More than one clue can be given for a puzzle. For example, there are five clues given to help solve puzzle 177.

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In this puzzle, some of the clues could go in a variety of different places on the grid. For example, clue 5 could go in the top left, top right, bottom left, or bottom right.

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To decide where it needs to go, start with clue 3. Because of its shape, it must go in the top left corner of the puzzle.

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Now, you can look to see where to put clue 5.

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It cannot go in the squares at the top left, because square 2 is already yellow, and it cannot be blue as well. For the same reason, clue 5 cannot go in the squares at the top right. It cannot go in the bottom left, because square 4 is already an X, and it cannot also be a circle.

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The only place to put clue 5 is in the squares at the bottom right.

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The only clues that are left are 1, 2, and 4. Clue 1 is the same shape as clue 5.

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It might also go in the same four places in the puzzle as clue 5. Not so fast, though. If you look at what is already there, you can see that it cannot go in the top right, because then the green triangle would have to go in square 2, which must contain a yellow shape.

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It cannot go in the bottom left, because the triangles would have to go in squares 4 and 5, which already contain an X and a circle, respectively.

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It cannot go in the bottom right because the green triangle would go in square 5, which already has a circle in it.

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The only place it can go is the top left.

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This leaves clues 2 and 4.

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These are some simple guidelines to get you started. Try puzzles 1–4, 6, 9, 10, 13, 15, 21, and 27 for some practice using these techniques. As you go through the website, you will probably notice that some clues are given on a blue background. These are negative clues, and our next blog will go over how to use those. You can also read more about negative clues and clues that rotate or reflect on the Clue Example page and the Extensions page. Good luck!

Images based on Gridworks puzzle images.

The Fatality of the Infinite

You glare out of headlamps. Empty skyline eyes and a crisis in the mold of your bones. Show me that, the corners of your room, that dystopian hellscape chest where you siphoned blood from the mouths of the damaged and the damned. Stringing cigarettes between your loose chord fingers and weeping in the neon dreams of cities, up there on your roofless tower, breathing piss and wonder—I can’t sleep, and your city’s so bright, those lonely lights on the water. Your mind looks the same in the dark as it does with the lights on.

I like how you like, in gritty sanity checks, that rush you get when you’re edging close to death. Fire escapes. Such starless beds of chaos but with their callous truth, for all things drunk on the gridwork of neon ultraviolet brace themselves skyward to drink from hope, to drink from hell. Death is a promise and all that’s beautiful drifts, called soft in lyrics from the Renaissance and the megaplex night and how our fires burn low, when dreams are such subtle liquid shed down by the stars.

If I turned invisible I’d go to Paris and beat up a performing street mime. A burst of body language—Dost thou wish to engage me in fisticuffs? Approach me, henceforth!—how well it knows the undeniable poetry to choreographed violence, just as that romance of the black hours, the synaesthesia of seasons, how you felt about walking through the snow, self-deprecating, slow motion. The same way I never understood why flags of surrender are white, and not drenched in the full-bodied aroma of blood. You can’t save people, you can only love them; the rest is out of your hands.

Finding God is simply happiness made from the firing of neurons; it is a solace that, blind to the blue of the heavens, seeks inspiration in the hell of despair. I would have none but the red smoke of your words. After all we are all cemeteries of names, heads never empty. Cities too are always something lost—incarnations of time in stone, palimpsests of history. I have come to cities in search of strangers… strangers with their stars out, stripped bare from beyond memory. I, too, am the afterlife of this lost country, here only to reclaim the dead. If life could speak it would scream.

I would have you, gild-haired temptress, gleaming cauldron of the sun. But I cannot bury you. Only strangers can.

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