great-britian

The Illusion of Movement.

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The Palace of Westminster (AKA The Houses of Parliament) over look a tranquil River Thames. The Houses of Parliament is most famous for the Clock Tower on the Northern flank, known world-wide as Big Ben. Big Ben however, is actually the name of the Bell held within the Clock Tower, whilst the tower itself is known as the Elizabeth Tower, as of September 2012. The Original Palace was destroyed in 1834 by a fire, and was subsequently rebuilt over the course of 30 years, finally being completed in 1870. The Elizabeth Tower was completed 12 years earlier however, in 1858, and remains to this day as the worlds Tallest four-faced chiming clock.

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Wheel of Light.

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The Millennium Wheel, the official name of this famous London landmark is the  EDF Energy London Eye, and is known colloquially as the London Eye. At 120 meters (394 ft) , it was the tallest Ferris Wheel in the world when it was constructed, whilst it no longer holds this particular record it remains the tallest in Europe, and is the UK’s most popular tourist attraction, visited by over 3.5 million people, a year. Since the 2000’s, it had become a focal point of the annual New Years Fireworks display, often featuring fireworks being fired from wheel itself, cementing it’s world famous landmark status.

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The Illusion of Movement.

Mark-Spokes.com | Twitter

The Palace of Westminster (AKA The Houses of Parliament) over look a tranquil River Thames. The Houses of Parliament is most famous for the Clock Tower on the Northern flank, known world-wide as Big Ben. Big Ben however, is actually the name of the Bell held within the Clock Tower, whilst the tower itself is known as the Elizabeth Tower, as of September 2012. The Original Palace was destroyed in 1834 by a fire, and was subsequently rebuilt over the course of 30 years, finally being completed in 1870. The Elizabeth Tower was completed 12 years earlier however, in 1858, and remains to this day as the worlds Tallest four-faced chiming clock.

Mark-Spokes.com

Twilight at Tower Bridge

Mark-Spokes.com | Twitter

Perhaps one of the most famous bridges in the world, certainly in England; Tower Bridge. Tower Bridge was completed in 1894 after nearly 12 years of construction and allowed tall masted ships to dock at the Pool of London, whilst simultaneously provided a new river crossing made necessary due to the increase commercial development in London’s East End. It simultaneously a suspension bridge and a bascule bridge, a rare occurence - even in the late Victorian era, if 244 meters (801 feet) long and links the districts of Tower Hamlets to the North with Southwark in the south. Such is it’s Iconic nature if featured heavily in the promotion of the recently London 2012 Summer Olympic Games - to the point where the logos of both the Olympics and Paralympics where suspended from the second tier.

The bridge consists of two towers tied together at the upper level by means of two horizontal walkways, designed to withstand the horizontal forces exerted by the suspended sections of the bridge on the landward sides of the towers. The vertical component of the forces in the suspended sections and the vertical reactions of the two walkways are carried by the two robust towers. The bascule pivots and operating machinery are housed in the base of each tower. The bridge’s present colour scheme dates from 1977, when it was painted red, white and blue for the Queen Elizabeth II’s silver jubilee. Originally it was painted a mid greenish-blue colour