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anonymous asked:

Is there ever really any real NEED to break a person's water artificially? If it doesn't break on it's own, the baby will just be born en caul, right?

You’re right!  There’s no medical need to break the water artificially.  Sometimes it might be decided that a baby isn’t tolerating labor very well and would be better off outside the womb, so some kind of labor-speeding agent needs to be used.  In the situation where breaking the water would actually help speed labor, it might be a better decision to use that rather than a medication like Pitocin, but in a healthy birth with no issues, there’s absolutely no reason to break the bag.

Some people say that babies born “en caul,” or still in the amniotic sac, will be prophets, but I like to think that they will be midwives.  Below the cut are photos of babies being born in the caul – NSFW-ish graphic photos of birth.

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anonymous asked:

Do patients ever want to deliver standing up? Does this make it tricky for the midwife? Thanks!

Yes, people give birth standing up all the time!

It does make things a little harder for the midwife - I have certainly gotten a crick or two in my neck from trying to get underneath someone giving birth, but that’s kind of how midwives operate.  Since we support and respect normal physiologic birth, we don’t tell people to get in bed or on their backs just so that we can see better.

It can be a little wacky in the immediate aftermath - that is, getting everyone comfortable, making sure baby isn’t yanked too hard, making sure the new parent doesn’t slip and fall in amniotic fluid or blood, etc.

People give birth kneeling, on hands-and-knees, in a lunch position, in a squat, and in other upright positions all the time.  More graphic and not-graphic photos of birth below the cut.

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