"While the American Museum of Natural History has been hosting Night at the Museum sleepovers for kids, there’s never been an adult-only one. Ever. Until now. They’ve just announced their first sleepover for grown-ups, which will take place on Friday, August 1st. - Gothamist

Amenities will include some of the following:

"Explorers can roam through the nearly empty halls of the Museum (including the spiders). There will also be a flashlight tour.”

"Participants will be invited to attend a special presentation in The Power of Poison exhibition with Curator Mark Siddall."

"There will be a midnight viewing of the Dark Universe Space Show, narrated by Neil deGrasse Tyson."

"There will also be charging stations and tea service."

Ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh.

Omg.

Banjos in the void

Is anybody really outraged anymore? It’s a different time. I feel like in my parents’ generation there was still room for outrage, there was still room for stigmatization. […] At the end of the day, it’s like “so you used a banjo in a black metal band, that’s novel, but is it good?”

For G. W. F. Hegel, “negative” human freedom—freedom understood as a mere lack of restriction—is socially dangerous. As an indiscriminate revolution against structure, it has no positive ambition, no act other than destruction. This “freedom of the void” manifested itself in history as the giddy nihilism of France’s Reign of Terror. Friedrich Nietzsche, however, considered the void to be a space of infinite possibility. After humanity rebels against order, it finds that “the sea […] lies open again”, that human drive is unlimited. The void is the stage for humanity’s greatest performance: the heroic, tragic and aimless assertion of the will, which creates new values from nothing.

In an interview with Gothamist earlier this year, composer Tyondai Braxton opined that art no longer has any boundaries—structures, stigmas—left to deconstruct. In other words, the long modern project of rebellion has, finally, transformed art into an “open sea” where everything is permitted. But Nietzsche misjudged humanity’s power to create without rules: Hegel was correct that negative freedom is expressed only as destruction and debasement. Today, installations of cellophane-wrapped candy are displayed in museums; and unaccompanied feedback is sold as music. Yet, Braxton suggests that the void is also a gift. In its silence, we may once again hear the primordial question that our structures arose to answer: anything may be made—but what is good?

Still Eating Oranges

Watch on azerte.tumblr.com

Mindrelic - Manhattan in motion

A Stevie Nicks Selfie Show Is Coming To NYC


Stevie Nicks by Stevie Nicks. (Courtesy of the Morrison Hotel Gallery)

Standing in a room full of selfies taken by Stevie Nicks probably feels something like being a newborn baby bird encircled in a nest, wrapped in the warmth of your mother’s wing, at twilight. The Fleetwood Mac frontwoman was selfie-ing way before Instagram, and now her (to use outdated Vernacular) “self portraits” will be on display at the Morrison Hotel Gallery.

The exhibition, according to ArtsBeat, will start at 201 Mulberry Street (October 10th and 11th) and then move to the Morrison Hotel Gallery (at 116 Prince Street) on October 13th. It will run through the end of the month, presumably closing on Halloween, because “white witch.”

The show—called “24 K Gold”—will contain “self-portraits by Stevie Nicks from between 1975 and 1987. The pictures for the show were selected by Dave Stewart, the Eurythmics guitarist, who co-produced her In Your Dreams album.” All portraits were “taken in the wee hours of the night, both at home and on tour, using Polaroid cameras.” Nicks told ArtsBeat she was taking the portraits because she “wanted to learn how to become a photographer. I was the stylist, the makeup artist, the furniture mover, the lighting director—it was my joy. I was the model.”

You can check out a little preview right here.

Jen Carlson in Arts & Entertainment on Sep 18, 2014 4:57 pm

THANKS TO JEN CARLSON AND GOTHATMIST.COM  FOR THE ARTICLE.

 I SWEAR  I WOULD GIVE ALL OF MY CHILDREN AND MY MOTHER TO BE ABLE TO SEE THIS

*I SWEAR  I WOULD GIVE ALL OF MY CHILDREN AND MY MOTHER TO BE ABLE TO SEE THIS.

This girl just made my night. I want to meet her just so I can tell her she’s my spirit animal. We take a lot as servers and bartenders (and I’m sure retail workers and other service industry professionals alike) and we write things off as being “part of the job” but that shit gets so old and she calls it out.

(Side note: I wish she didn’t feel the need to say what she was wearing, but I get it. She CLEARLY wasn’t leading him to think anything sexual of her. But even if she was wearing a skimpy outfit - keep your hands to yourself like they taught you in kindergarten. Sing a song if you have to. Let’s write it together, okay?

To the tune of Three Blind Mice:
Don’t touch her
Don’t touch him
Let’s all keep
Our hands to ourselves
If you start to feel the need to reach out
Put your hands in your pockets and give a great shout
Let’s respect our neighbors and workers and friends
Don’t touch her
Don’t touch him.

Side, side note: If you need a children’s nursery rhyme rewritten in accordance with your anger, you know where to find me.)

A SoHo bartender is fed up with misogynistic bros treating her like a piece of meat, and she’s written a powerful open letter to the hedge funder who she says grabbed her ass at work. Laura Ramadei, an actor who tends bar at Lucky Strike on Grand Street, says that when she asked customer Brian Lederman what he’d like, he immediately groped her. And after she made it clear she wasn’t enamored by his charms, he left her with a shabby tip.

Be nice to your bartender, server, host…just be nice.

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