GamerGate also seems to have gained some steam, and some prominent support, from elements of the conservative political movement in the U.S. (including Adam Baldwin) who argue that the problems stem from the efforts of “social justice warriors” on the left, who want to destroy the rights of freedom-loving gamers. In that sense, it shares some DNA with the Tea Party or “birther” movements.
— 

How did GamerGate become a lightning rod for violence — and is social media helping or making it worse?

When you’re on the same side as Adam Baldwin, you’re on the wrong side.

(There is a 100% chance he uses this post as an excuse to have his mouthbreathing followers attack me, incidentally.)

What comes after Siri? A web that talks back.

image

Found on GigaOm, by Stacey Higginbotham: “Siri may be the hottest personal assistant since I Dream of Jeannie, but Apple’s artificial intelligence is only the tip of the iceberg as we combine ubiquitous connectivity, sensor networks, big data and new methods of AI and programming into a truly connected network. Instead of connecting people to people as Facebook or even some of the cooler services like Turntable.fm do, the web of the future will connect machines to machines and connect those machines back to people. What Om calls the “alive web” is still people talking to other people, but the next generation of the web is far more interesting. It’s when machines start talking to each other and then to people. The emergence of the Internet of things is well documented but in order to get there, we’ll need several advancements in technology from low-power, cheap sensors to …read on.”
My Opinion on Yelp.com

Reading Om Malik’s review of what makes a successful Internet company I was surprised to see Yelp as a leading example. It reminded me of the negative or less than great experiences I’ve had on the site. It seems that every time I’m on Yelp I’m sifting through information for which I have little to no context. I don’t know the people who’s opinion I’m supposed to trust. This is fine when dealing with products or books or even clothes to a certain extent. There’s more context available for each of these. In particular, quality of a product is something that anyone can determine without being to subjective. “Quality” is a fairly universal metric but what makes “good” food is far more subjective. My issue with Yelp and its ability to scale as a company, is that there’s no conditions by which to quickly contextualize each user’s taste. Leaving me with no idea if their version of what “good” is is the same as mine. This means Yelp is more of a listing of locations than a service. This leads me to my second issue; information. Via Yelp you can neither gain an understanding of a restaurant’s menu nor get a bearing on available seating. I have to seek out this information from menupages.com and opentable.com. Yelp would be wise to focus less on glitzy AR mobile features and more on adding these products as features of their service.

Since most products trend towards becoming service within an offer (think iPod device -> iPod App -> Spotify) there is a high likelihood that between Yelp, OpenTable and Menupages we’ll see their offers merging and competing further in the coming year.

Admittedly, I’m on a rant here. I should also admit that I’m being a little snobby. But I also, and I can’t imagine that my point of view is unique.

Framesocket, GigaOm and the Cost of Video

We were thrilled recently to have Framesocket covered by Ryan Lawler (@ryanlawler) on GigaOm, "Framesocket: A video platform with developers in mind".

Framesocket is designed to make it easy for publishers to create video sites and reach a number of devices. The platform allows publishers to build branded video players and archive pages, and has a flexible encoding engine that creates video files which can be viewed across a wide range of devices including as the iPhone, iPad and Android mobile phones and tablets.”

Ryan then went on to raise one important question, "Who really needs another online video platform?"

Our Answer: Developers

“Framesocket was built by the guys behind video real estate platform WellcomeMat and location-based photo- and video-tagging service PegShot. The idea behind creating Framesocket was actually to make it easier to develop their own video-based applications.”

It’s true we absolutely aim to help small teams quickly build media (video/photo) services into their mobile or desktop apps. It’s also true we intend to eat our own dog food. Most of the inspiration for Framesocket came from the challenges we faced building WellcomeMat and Pegshot. Our team has put years of research and development into building media solutions (encoding, hosting, partner API integration, etc.) for both services. All of this effort led us to ask the following question…

"Knowing what we know about video, what are the most valuable aspects of video platforms and how can we offer only these things at an affordable rate?"

Framesocket is our answer. As Co-Founder Christian Sterner likes to say, Framesocket is the beating heart, the engine powering all future Wellcomemat, Pegshot and client integrations.

The following presentation touches on some of the experiences that eventually led to our development of the Framesocket platform. Take note as the last few slides review how your team could save time and money implementing the Framesocket API.

The Cost of Video


View more presentations from Phil Thomas Di Giulio
Framesocket, GigaOm and the Cost of Video

We were thrilled recently to have Framesocket covered by Ryan Lawler (@ryanlawler) on GigaOm, "Framesocket: A video platform with developers in mind".


Framesocket is designed to make it easy for publishers to create video sites and reach a number of devices. The platform allows publishers to build branded video players and archive pages, and has a flexible encoding engine that creates video files which can be viewed across a wide range of devices including as the iPhone, iPad and Android mobile phones and tablets.”

Ryan then went on to raise one important question, "Who really needs another online video platform?"

Our Answer:
Developers

“Framesocket was built by the guys behind video real estate platform WellcomeMat and location-based photo- and video-tagging service PegShot. The idea behind creating Framesocket was actually to make it easier to develop their own video-based applications.”

It’s true we absolutely aim to help small teams quickly build media (video/photo) services into their mobile or desktop apps. It’s also true we intend to eat our own dog food. Most of the inspiration for Framesocket came from the challenges we faced building WellcomeMat and Pegshot. Our team has put years of research and development into building media solutions (encoding, hosting, partner API integration, etc.) for both services. All of this effot led us to ask the following question…

"Knowing what we know about video, what are the most valuable aspects of video platforms and how can we offer only these things at an affordable rate?"

Framesocket is our answer. As Co-Founder Christian Sterner likes to say, Framesocket is the beating heart, the engine powering all future Wellcomemat, Pegshot and client integrations.

The following presentation touches on some of the experiences that eventually led to our development of the Framesocket platform. Take note as the last few slides review how your team could save time and money implementing the Framesocket API.

The Cost of Video

View more presentations from Phil Thomas Di Giulio
How Connectivity is Revolutionizing Everything

Technology is continuously changing the world we live in – what we buy, how we view content, how we engage with other people, how a brand motivate its followers, and even how we define ourselves. This week, GigaOM looked at 10 different areas in our lives and studied how technology has changed them now and what we should expect in the future. Here are a few of our favorite thoughts:

Data is the new digital currency

 “Connected data brings with it life-altering promise for those willing to embrace data as a currency. Imagine a digital profile traveling with you as you peruse the web, letting sites with analytics capabilities know who you are and what your preferences are. Without having to select preferences or even log in to each site, information, products, music — whatever you care about — would emerge. But it doesn’t stop with the digital world. For example, a customer loyalty card connected to your digital profile swiped at the entrance to a building could bring about a truly personalized shopping experience full of unique offers and specialized services.”

image


Where is the new who

 “Advertisers and brick-and-mortar retailers are still trying to figure out the best ways to help consumers pull relevant location-based information as well as push valuable deals and data to them — and not get rejected as spam or be seen as stalkers. Many are still waiting for a killer app, whether that’s local ads, or location-relevant coupons. Emerging companies are helping marketers and developers leverage location to reach consumers.”

 The future web is alive

“I called it the Alive Web, though mostly due to lack of a better way of describing it. It’s a web that is organic, alive, in real-time and as unpredictable as the people who use it. This is the web that changes all the time, every time, much like the real world. What’s behind the Alive Web? Connectedness! With more than a billion broadband connections and half a billion fast wireless connections, the Internet of today is a whole lot faster and much easier to access. In some parts of the world (and increasingly more each day), we are almost always connected and this gives an opportunity to experience a web that is more immersive and interactive.

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 Identity is an industry now

 “The bottom line is that identity has become a very big business online, and providing the means to verify and support that identity — as well as to track and target advertising based on it — is seen as a crucial part of any web company.” 

 We are all media now

 “In a world of connected devices and always-on networks, everyone is now a member of the media. While the full ramifications of this are still becoming clear, they have already been profound: Social-media tools that allow anyone to become a publisher have created democracy of distribution that has torn down the barriers between the media and everyday life. News consumers who used to stick to one or two newspapers and a TV channel are using social networks and apps to curate their news from a variety of sources — some of them mainstream, but many of them not.”

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Other areas examined: Cars, Stuff, Body, Work, Travel

A recent resurgence of the ‘is Social Business dead?’ meme bubbled over this week in a post by Chris Heuer, and smelling the bacon grease I ran toward the fire, offered up an analysis, and announced a new project, at the same time:

an excerpt

Social business isn’t dead, but it has become tired. It’s not longer even an edgy and emotive alternative to business-as-usual, and partly because of the half he [Heuer] gets wrong or never examines: today’s tools for social business. The world of business has moved ahead to accepting the class of contemporary technologies that embody the slightly better 2013-style of collaborative business, dominated by work management tools from Microsoft, Salesforce, IBM, Jive, and other established enterprise software vendors. To the extent that those tools and the practices that surround them define the social business, then they have become commonplace, not a profound redefinition of working together in new ways.

• What is needed, though, is not a retreat to arguing about the term social business, but a movement forward, a movement embodied as a community of people committed to advancing new principles of learning, organization, leadership, and management, pushing forward into a new future of work. •

In  writings more recent that the January piece Heuer pointed to, I have made a strong case for the following trends, supported by a wide range of research here at GigaOM and other firms:

  1. C-level executives hope to gain another round of productivity from new technologies and practices that are grouped under the loose rubric of ‘social’.
  2. They believe that the mechanisms used in the past — demanding more work from employees, and routinization of work practices — cannot be used again, at least not to get any serious gains.
  3. The answer — if that is a question — is for organizations to adopt a new form factor for business, one that undoes the rules and loosens the ties that make businesses slow to learn, innovate, and respond.
  4. One of the toolsets to apply in this quest for the fast-and-loose business are ideas about working socially and tools to support that. However, the greatest advances are likely to be more closely linked to fundamentals of organizational culture, and the relationship of the individual to work and the organization, rather than a social business breakthrough, per se.

• To the extent that social business was a concept that a community of practitioners hoped would represent or spark a radical break with the past, it has fallen short. •

Perhaps, then, I could restate Heuer’s apocalyptic statement into something more practical and pragmatic: social business isn’t dead, but it isn’t enough, either. And simply getting the meaning of the term straightened out — if such a thing is possible, at this point — won’t add much, either. At the best, there are a set of ideas derived from the social revolution on the web — like pull versus push communication, and the benefits of defaulting to open, not closed, communication — that can be productively applied to make working socially easier and faster.

What is needed, though, is not a retreat to arguing about the term social business, but a movement forward, a movement embodied as a community of people committed to advancing new principles of learning, organization, leadership, and management, pushing forward into a new future of work.

To the extent that social business was a concept that a community of practitioners hoped would represent or spark a radical break with the past, it has fallen short. You can interpret that as a failure of the concept, or a sign of endurance of the mainstream notion of business, or perhaps even as a failed power grab by those most loudly advocating for ‘social business’-led change. But this does not mean that work isn’t changing, or that we do not need even more change — in our organizations and ourselves — in the months and years ahead. We do. It is essential to find new balance in a new normal, where the ground beneath our metaphorical feet is never steady and always shifting.

I am committed to help give such a movement a bit more definition, and in the following weeks I will be laying out some ideas about a loose community of people committed to the investigation of the future of work. I am launching an effort to do that called Chautauqua, named after the adult education movement of late 19th and early 20th century America. I hope to work with local groups across the country and internationally to explore a topic central to the future of work each month, in a model stolen (honestly) from the Pecha Kucha and Creative Mornings movements.

You might want to read the whole piece at GigaOM Research, or visit the Chautauqua site and join up. 

What does journalism of the future look like? 

Filloux’s blog post, entitled “Jazz Is Not a Byproduct of Rap Music,” is a response to something Jarvis wrote several weeks ago, in which the author and New York University City University of New York’s Graduate School of Journalism professor argued that the news article — the central unit of storytelling that we have become familiar with in newspapers and other forms of media — should no longer be the default for every news event. In many cases, Jarvis said, the article or story should be seen as a “value-added luxury or byproduct” of the process of news-gathering, rather than the central goal in every situation.

Via GigaOm 

Interesting infographic on GigaOM on why businesses are failing to successfully deal with disruption, competition, and change. Many of the reported causal factors will be quite familiar to anyone who has worked in a larger corporation. Although this highlights some of those factors, there isn’t much offered in terms of potential solutions to overcome these issues.

Some of the factors affecting the pace of business change:

  • Volatile economic environment
  • Increased competition
  • Fast-changing regulatory environment
  • Rapid changes in customer preferences
  • Changing technologies

Barriers slowing business response to change:

  • Lack of resources to implement change
  • Lack of coordination across different functions
  • Inaccurate or incomplete data
  • Bureaucratic decision-making process
  • Reluctance among senior executives to change strategy
  • Lack of leadership
  • Lack of autonomy for managers/executives
  • Reluctance to admit that previous strategic decisions were wrong
  • Lack of innovation capability

Read the rest of this post on Brilliant Forge

Mobilize 2011 video livestream #mobilizeconf

Watch live streaming video from mobilize2011 at livestream.com

This week (Monday + Tuesday) is Mobilize 2011, a conference dedicated to the emerging consumer and enterprise changes coming at us in mobile. We’re particularly interested in the sessions relating to consumerization.

We’ve plucked out the most relevant sessions and times for consumerization of IT topics from the full Mobilize schedule website, which you should check out. :

Monday

9:20 AM TABLETS AND SMARTPHONES BY THE NUMBERS

The growing popularity of smartphones and tablets has opened up new opportunities for mobile content and apps – and raises critical questions, as well. Do different platforms and devices require different monetization strategies or does it depend on which demographic group you are trying to reach? How do different kinds of consumers respond to mobile ads? How much are consumers willing to pay for various types of content? How effective are mobile ads? These questions and more are revealed by audience research giant, The Nielsen Company. Speakers: Jonathan Carson - GM, Digital, Nielsen

Tuesday

9:05 AM THE $20 BILLION UPSET

There’s a new force to be reckoned with in the enterprise: the consumerization of IT. The rise of mobile products such as the iPhone, iPad and Android platforms — along with the easy accessibility of cloud computing services — is radically disrupting conventional IT infrastructures. Resistance is futile. The network and content security industry is estimated to be worth more than $20 billion by 2015, and as advances in technology turn this industry upside down, smart and agile enterprises stand to realize considerable competitive advantages by recognizing the new shape of IT architecture and the value of a seamless user experience. This talk between Cisco Security’s VP/GM Tom Gillis and the New York Times’ Quentin Hardy will delve deeper into the infinite number of possible responses demanded of IT departments. Moderated by: Quentin Hardy - Deputy Tech Editor, The New York Times Speakers: Tom Gillis - VP and GM Security Technology Business Unit, Cisco

9:45 AM WILL ENTERPRISE BE THE GAME CHANGER FOR HTML 5 AND TABLET APPS?

For companies that have embraced device diversity, the decision to go with native or web-based mobile apps can cause analysis paralysis. While native apps provide richer functionality, in-house app developers have already standardized on HTML as the platform of choice for building B2B apps. Will enterprise lead the way in using cross-platform mobile development tools and mobile middleware platforms to get the job done? There is much anticipation and hype about the entry of tablet devices into the enterprise. Yet we are seeing very little innovation of applications that actually take advantage of the tablet’s benefits. Is the future of the tablet simply replacing existing game consoles and e-readers, or will productivity be the app that really makes use of the tablet form factor? Moderated by: Nathan Clevenger - Chief Software Architect, ITR Mobility Speakers: Santiago Becerra - Co-Founder and CEO, MeLLmo Adam Blum - CEO, Rhomobile Chris Kemmerer - Director, Mobility Solutions, Verizon Sean Whiteley - SVP, salesforce.com

10:25 AM 3 KEY PILLARS OF ENTERPRISE MOBILITY: APPLICATIONS, DATA AND PEOPLE

Virtualization and high-powered smartphones are a match made in heaven for the enterprise. Most of the arguments involving security and data integrity disappear. We talk with the visionary CTO and thought leader at technology giant VMware about what he sees as the real outcomes of virtualization on the handset and where VMware will lead the industry next. Moderated by: Stacey Higginbotham - Senior Writer, GigaOM Speakers: Stephen Herrod - CTO, VMware

4:05 PM MOBILIZING YOUR BUSINESS: CHALLENGE OR OPPORTUNITY?

Though mobility is a hot topic in the tech world, organizations are still grappling with some of the most basic issues around mobility in the workplace. In fact, enterprise IT is reaching the end of the first chapter of this mobile transformation. Organizations are beginning to realize they need to look beyond mobile device management to a broader, more strategic opportunity to manage the mobile enterprise. This panel covers mobile device management, mobile application management, tablets, mobile cloud computing, security and more. Moderated by: Philippe Winthrop - Managing Director, The Enterprise Mobility Foundation Speakers: Chuck Goldman - Founder and Chief Strategy Officer, Apperian John Herrema - SVP of Corporate Strategy, Good Technology Julie Palen - SVP, Strategic Business Development and Mobile Device Management, Tangoe Bob Tinker - CEO, MobileIron

#roadmapconf Whether it was the steam engine, shipping lanes, railroads, cars and highways or the Internet — each increased our connectedness and in the process, redefined and compressed time and distance. The impact was felt in how we lived, worked, created and consumed. With the rise of anywhere computing, we are seeing time and distance compress even further.
vimeo


Depois da brilhante impressora SWYP, o escritório de design @artefactgroup, cria mais um produto conceito, a câmera WVIL.

Om Malik do @GigaOM comenta sobre a influência que o iPhone tem sobre diversos aspectos da experiência de uso (UX) de dispositivos digitais.

The Future of Work: Is it Flexible Chaos?

Some commentators and analysts suggest that the future of work is…

chaotic.

Image credit: Kevin Dooley

For example, to describe the changing nature of work, Gartner research analysts as well as Imran Ali at GigaOm use terms like “work swarms”, “work sketch-ups”, and “spontaneous work”.

A work swarm is a new kind of skills-based flexible project team. Instead “traditional teams of people familiar with each other” (usually drawn from the office pool of usual suspects), ad-hoc groups or “work swarms,” often with no previous experience of working with each other, and possibly geographically distant from each other, will become a commonplace team structure.

A work sketch-up is a more informal way to scope a project or map a process. In fact,
according to Gartner and GigaOm, work sketch-ups (presumably rather than formal project plans) will define “most “non-routine” work activities; the process models for these activities will be simple “sketch-ups,” created on the fly”.

Spontaneous work refers to a way of “seeking new opportunities and creating projects around them” that is likely to be “an opportunistic, rather than strategic, activity”.

With terms like that - and other concepts like the human cloud and the 4.0 Career - the future of work can look pretty loosey-goosey. Or chaotic.

Or perhaps we call it non-routine (Gartner calls it “the de-routinization of work”), or collaborative, creative and results-driven.

We like to call it flexible.

vimeo

MIT project lets you mine your email to map out your digital life

I posted this over at GigaOM Pro:

I think there is an important parallel between urban travel and social business. There is a now well-understood but counter-intuitive law in traffic engineering, called Braess’ paradox, where closing streets can lead to better traffic flow.

Linda Baker, Removing Roads and Traffic Lights Speeds Urban Travel

The brainchild of mathematician Dietrich Braess of Ruhr University Bochum in Germany, the eponymous paradox unfolds as an abstraction: it states that in a network in which all the moving entities rationally seek the most efficient route, adding extra capacity can actually reduce the network’s overall efficiency. The Seoul project inverts this dynamic: closing a highway—that is, reducing network capacity—improves the system’s effectiveness.

[…]

It turns out that you don’t have to actually close streets off to cars to get these effects, you can institute what is called ‘shared streets’, where traffic lights and markings are removed, forcing drivers to operate on a more social basis: making eye contact with other drivers, bicyclists, and pedestrians. These approaches share a common basis: movement in the system requires multilateral agreement. In Braess’ world, unilateral optimization is blocked, and in shared streets, social interaction is made necessary.

sourceEmily Badger

My belief is that this is quite like the adoption of social principles in business.

Go read the whole thing, where I lay out Boyd’s Law, among other things.

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