gif:ripperstreet

I need more blogs to follow

Relog or like if you post:

● Sherlock

● Downton Abbey

● Doctor Who

● Super Natural

● Star Wars

● Star Trek

● Lord of the Rings

● Hannibal

● Game of Thrones

● Big Bang Theory

● Merlin

● The Avengers

● Tom Hiddleston

● Misha Collins

● Benedict Cumberbatch

● Harry Potter

● The Hobbit

● Ripperstreet

I’m sure I will follow you if you post one of these things. Should that not be the case? Send me a message and I’ll do it anyway!

Unrelated to SH but I CANNOT BELIEVE THIS IS HAPPENING, Ripper Street is going to RETURN!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Simon Dennis is Director of Photography for TV series, including Ripper Street.

Of course, waiting for the official official confirmation BUT THIS IS THE BEST NEWS EVER!!!!!!!!!!

EDIT: now the Simon Dennis tweet is gone. Hmmm. I hope to God that it’s not bad news.

I need more blogs to follow

Relog or like if you post:

● Sherlock

● Downton Abbey

● Doctor Who

● Super Natural

● Star Wars

● Star Trek

● Lord of the Rings

● Hannibal

● Game of Thrones

● Big Bang Theory

● Merlin

● The Avengers

● Tom Hiddleston

● Misha Collins

● Benedict Cumberbatch

● Harry Potter

● The Hobbit

● Ripperstreet

I’m sure I will follow you if you post one of these things. Should that not be the case? Send me a message and I’ll do it anyway!

Yet another brilliant crime drama cancelled. WTF is happening ??? First Whitechapel, now this. And why ? Because BBC believes that brainless dribble like ‘I’m A Celebrity Get Me Out Of Here’ is a far more interesting show. 

If you are a fan of this show like me and don’t want to see it brutally cancelled. Please sign the following petitions and also feel free to use this poster to spread the word.

https://www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/reverse-the-bbc-s-decision-to-cancel-ripper-street#supporters

http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/save-ripper-street

http://www.activism.com/en_GB/petition/bring-back-ripper-street/46268

In addition to the sudden and depressing realisation that we will never get to fully explore the lives of our favourite Whitechapel residents and learn of their collective future and fate, the news that the BBC has axed Ripper Street paints an altogether more unsettling portrait of the television industry and indeed the cultural appetite of its audience as a whole.

I want to take issue with the British Broadcasting Corporation themselves and the following quotes are extracts from the BBC’s own website which explicitly state their mission, vision and values:

“Our mission

To enrich people’s lives with programmes and services that inform, educate and entertain.

Our vision

To be the most creative organisation in the world.

Our values

Trust is the foundation of the BBC: we are independent, impartial and honest.

Audiences are at the heart of everything we do.

We take pride in delivering quality and value for money.

Creativity is the lifeblood of our organisation.

We respect each other and celebrate our diversity so that everyone can give their best.

We are one BBC: great things happen when we work together.”

I would argue that the BBC are not only failing as an organisation in their endeavour to uphold the admirable objective to “inform, educate and entertain” but also guilty of not really understanding their licence fee paying public or at least not acknowledging the hopes and dreams of it audience in terms of what we expect from prime time entertainment.

We want to be challenged with adult dramas that deal with stimulating plots and provocative themes and issues. Ripper Street not only manages - or should I say managed? - these things on a weekly basis, but given its social and historical context, also most certainly adheres to the BBC’s remit to “inform, educate and entertain”.

Furthermore, the BBC’s website also states its six public purposes which include “stimulating creativity and cultural excellence”. I find it most difficult to relate today’s decision to cancel Ripper Street to any of their aforementioned aims and objectives. Indeed, the BBC is becoming increasingly indistinguishable from its more commercial and unsavoury rivals.

In order to justify the licence fee, the BBC needs to stand out from its other terrestrial television competitors rather than emulate them in their planning and commissioning of their much heralded promotion of “Original British Drama”.

Additionally, the BBC’s decision to axe Ripper Street also highlights the cultural bankruptcy of the commissioning panels and powers that be, an epidemic that is spreading throughout our television schedules at an alarming rate and embracing the mind numbing and increasing trends and appetites for reality television.

We have been refining the art of storytelling as a human race since we were cavemen. Stories that have made us laugh and stories that have made us cry. These stories have transcended the spoken word and prospered throughout literature, theatre, film and television. If reality TV continues to plague our screens and our popular culture, I fear what will happen to our art - what is says about its artists and about their audience. Indeed, what will become of the next generation of actors, writers and directors?

This petition isn’t just about Ripper Street, it’s about the many half-witted dullards who make up the high viewing figures for reality trash and encourage the television industry to create more of the same. It is about taking a stance against reality TV and saying that art matters and it is something to be valued within society. It is a demand from their customers that the BBC invest in quality drama and its artists.

Tell them that we demand a third series, or at the very least, an opportunity for the writers, directors and actors to complete the legacy of Ripper Street and bring closure to our beloved characters by way of a one-off special.

Ironically, one of the BBC’s stated values reads as follows “We are one BBC: great things happen when we work together”. There may be some truth in that!

The are more stories to be told.

More tears to shed and more laughs to share.

And we demand to see them on BBC1.

JACK LO SQUARTATORE NELLA CULTURA CINEMATOGRAFICA DI MASSA

Quella di Jack the Ripper” è una delle storie che più ha ispirato i cineasti di tutto il Mondo, ieri come oggi ed è difficile negare che l’avvenimento di per sé sia intrigante. Tutti i grandi appassionati del genere gotico conoscono la vicenda di questo sconosciuto serial killer che ha terrorizzato le strade di Londra nel 1888 e sicuramente sapranno qual è stata la tecnica, o follia omicida, che più lo ha reso famoso ai nostri occhi. Non è questa la sede per approfondire l’argomento, ma vorrei concentrarmi piuttosto su quello che questo personaggio ha rappresentato per il mondo del cinema. A partire dal primo film in cui è apparso, nel 1924 ne Il Gabinetto delle figure di cera del tedesco Paul Leni, lo Squartatore ha rappresentato l’assassino perfetto, colui in grado di seminare terrore non solo in tutta l’Inghilterra, ma anche nel resto dell’Europa di fine Ottocento, con la grande qualità di essere sempre attentissimo a non lasciare alcun tipo di indizio che permettesse di risalire alla sua identità. Uno dei film che ha reso intrigante questa figura, e senz’altro anche uno dei più famosi, è La vera storia di Jack lo Squartatore (From Hell), che sicuramente tutti ricorderete per Johhny Depp nel ruolo dell’ispettore Abberline, incaricato di seguire le tracce sugli omicidi commessi. È interessante come il regista abbia deciso di fare del killer un rispettabilissimo e comune “dottore” (sir e medico onorario della Famiglia Reale d’Inghilterra), tra l’altro in là con l’età (e la cosa che un uomo anziano possa essere la mano di quei terribili morti, mi fa sorridere parecchio). Anche la TV non ha fatto altro che sfruttare l’immagine di Jack confezionando serie e telefilm che, spesso, non hanno portato a un successo precedentemente sperato. Tuttavia, una fra le serie meglio realizzate è Ripper Street (che avete modo di vedere ogni lunedì sul canale 52 DMax), con il Mr Darcy della versione degli anni duemila, Matthew Macfadyen, nel ruolo dell’ispettore Reid, degno successore di Abberline. Qui la figura dello Squartatore funge un po’ da pretesto per una serie di omicidi anomali che i vari protagonisti dovranno cercare di risolvere, ma tutto sommato, gli episodi sono ben realizzati, con una scelta perfetta di costumi del tempo, un cast non famosissimo, ma convincente e delle storie ogni volta sempre più appassionanti. 

Se amate il genere macabro, ma volete buttarla sul ridere, vi consiglio di vedere la commedia nera di John Landis, Ladri di Cadaveri – Burke & Hare, ispirata agli omicidi commessi ad Edimburgo, in Scozia, da due precursori di Jack, nel 1827, che vendevano cadaveri come corpi da dissezionare a scopo scientifico.