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The Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, Liverpool, Merseyside, England (circa 1967)

Following decades of false starts and scrapped designs, an international design competition was held in 1959 for the design of a Roman Catholic cathedral in Liverpool. The design had to incorporate Edwin Lutyens’ crypt (part of an earlier, scrapped design) and accommodate a congregation of 2,000 whilst allowing them to be more involved in services.

Sir Frederick Gibberd won with a circular design with a central altar. Construction began in October 1962 and it was consecrated in May 1967. Conical in shape, with a truncated cone on top, it is predominantly supported by 16 concrete trusses connected by two ring beams. Above the upper ring beam is the lantern tower, adorned with stained glass windows and a crown of 16 pinnacles. Above the entrance is a wedge-shaped bell tower.

Many of the construction techniques used were innovative and experimental, however some also failed. Gibberd was sued by the cathedral for £1.3 million on 5 counts, including leaks in the aluminium roof and defects in the mosaic tiles on the concrete ribs, which were eventually completely removed in the 1990s. Today, the cathedral’s modern design divides opinion and is a Grade II* listed building.

JOB: Part 2 - Gibberd [London]

JOB: Part 2 - Gibberd [London]

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Gibberd are currently looking to recruit a further recently graduated [2013] Part 2 student on a permanent contract. [They have already taken on one of our students this month].

Ideal candidate will had some experience in an office [Preferably 6-12 months].

Opportunity to work at all workstages in close team of 25 people accross varied sectors [commercial office, transport, health, education etc]

If you are interested could you send your CV marked for the attention of John Mitham ASAP

j.mitham@gibberd.com

Please note that John is away now for a fortnight and will respond to emails on his return for interviews and start in early September.

Frederick Gibberd Partnership • 117-121 Curtain Road, London EC2A 3AD • Telephone: 020 7739 3400 • Facsimile: 020 7739 8948 • www.gibberd.com

FYI

Frederick Gibberd was one of the leading modernist Architects who notably did the master plan for Harlow in Essex, the London headquarters of Coutts & Co, Liverpool Catholic Cathedral, London Heathrow Airport and the London Central Mosque in Regent’s Park.

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2 Bedroom flat
The Beckers, Rectory Road
London N16
£275,000

Despite having had a studio in Hackney for the passed five years, living in Hackney has never really appealed to me. What can I say, I’m shallow, when it comes to the crunch I like a bit more glamour (I’ve just returned from a visit to Patrick Gwynne’s The Homewood, and that’s got glamour in abundance!)

Unfortunately there’s not a lot of glitz in this two bedroom flat in one of the low-rise blocks in The Beckers, but for £275,000 I guess that’s ok. Designed by Sir Frederick Gibberd in association with G. L. Downing in 1959, the scheme comprises of two eleven-storey blocks, this two bedroom four-storey block and three blocks of three bedroom terrace houses. 

Originally all the flats were provided with underfloor electric heating, I guess this is no longer the case. That’s about as much as I know about this estate, it is only round the corner from my studio so I should probably go and take a look. 

View the estate agents listing here.

Fullwell Cross Library (1959) by Frederick Gibberd.

“The formation of the London Borough of Redbridge in 1965 created a new geographical centre at Barkingside. An undeveloped site south of the Fulwell Cross roundabout was chosen for a new regional town centre with a proposed new library and swimming baths. The library and baths were designed by Frederick Gibberd, Coombes & Partners in association with H C Connell, Borough Architect. Frederick Gibberd was already working in Essex in the 1960s as Leader of the Harlow Development Corporation Design Group, planning the Essex New Town.


The Library has a distinctive circular shape with a raised central dome, 16 sided with large clerestory windows. Single storey offices and reading rooms form an outer ring. The Library has had various internal changes since it was built with a major redesign in 2011 by Opening the Book. However the original design concept is still evident.”

Image by Steve Cadman. Info from Open House London.

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