5 amazing glow in the dark creatures.

I Recently read About these amazing glow in the dark creatures in the newspapers and thought it was worth sharing

1.  Saprobe Panellus Stipticus, Fungi:

Found in Asia, Australia, Europe and North America, the bioluminesence emitted by the Saprobe fungi tht grows on decaying wood is called Foxfire (not fiefox).Also called fairy fire, it emits green light.

2. Firefly Squid (Watasenia Scintillans):

Japan’s tiny “Firefly” squid emits a blue bioluminescence. These emissions allow the firefly squid to communicate with other members of its species, warning them of predators and to lure fish into its bait.

3.  Glowworms:

Found in the Caverns of New Zealand and Australia, glowworms not only emit light to attract prey, but drop sticky silken thread from cave ceilings. This thread creates a cool visual effect similar to looking at the stars on a clear night.

4. Crystal Jelly ( Aequorea Victoria):

Found off the coast of North America, Crystal Jelly amits a green-blue glow with over 100 tiny, light-producing organs surrounding the body. It is collected for its luminiscent photo-proteins which are used as bio-markers in research studies on genes and to detect calcium.

5. Dinoflagellates

Found in both fresh and salt water, Dinoflagellates can produce a brilliant bioluminescence. When they are disturbed, either naturally or by man-made waves(boats, swimmers, fishermen) the water surface lights up with a beautiful blue glow.

Pretty amazing-nature Huh?…

Orange Fan Fungi - Anthracophyllum archeri

Anthracophyllum archeri (Marasmiaceae) is a species that grows on dead wood in tropical forests. Masses of these pale orange to vibrant red fans may totally cover the twigs on which they grow. Most of the records of these pretty mushrooms are from Australia and New Zealand.

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Steve Axford | Locality: not indicated (2014)

A handful of fungi species glows and now we have a likely reason

Did you know that there are mushrooms that actually glow? Aristotle was aware of this intriguing fact more than 2,000 years ago. He also was the first person to ask a simple question in print: Why? Now, researchers from Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine and their colleagues in Brazil reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on March 19 finally have a good answer. The light emitted from those fungi attracts the attention of insects, including beetles, flies, wasps, and ants. Those insect visitors are apparently good for the fungi because they spread the fungal spores around.

The new study also shows that the mushrooms’ bioluminescence is under the control of the circadian clock. In fact, it was that discovery that led the researchers to suspect that the mushrooms’ light must serve some useful purpose.

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