franklin-roosevelt

Signs as Presidents
  • Aries:Thomas Jefferson, John Tyler
  • Taurus:James Monroe, James Buchanan, Ulysses S Grant, Harry S Truman
  • Gemini:John F Kennedy, George Bush
  • Cancer:John Quincy Adams, Calvin Coolidge, Gerald R Ford, George W Bush
  • Leo:Benjamin Harrison, Herbert Hoover, Bill Clinton, Barack Obama
  • Virgo:William Howard Taft, Lyndon B Johnson
  • Libra:Rutherford B Hayes, Chester A Arthur, Dwight D Eisenhower, Jimmy Carter
  • Scorpio:John Adams, James K Polk, James A Garfield, Theodore Roosevelt, Warren G Harding
  • Sagittarius:Martin Can Buren, Zachary Taylor, Franklin Pierce
  • Capricorn:Millard Fillmore, Andrew Johnson, Woodrow Wilson
  • Aquarius:William Henry Harrison, Abraham Lincoln, William McKinley, Franklin D Roosevelt, Ronald Reagan
  • Pisces:George Washington, James Madison, Andrew Jackson, Grover Cleveland
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Before 1939 no reigning British Monarch had ever set foot on American soil since America’s Independence in 1776. But that all changed when King George VI (the one that stutterer and has that movie kings speech made about him) was invited by FDR to visit. In hopes to win over the sympathy and support of the American people towards the UK for the inevitable war ahead. And it work Americans welcomed the royal couple heartily and came from all over to just get a glimpse of them. 

So I just wanted to draw the reserved slightly shy royal couple being unconformable and overwhelmed with the the american presidential overly friendly family’s big personalities.

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Thirty-six prominent American writers including Eugene O’Neill, Dorothy Parker, and John Steinbeck, sent this telegram to President Franklin Roosevelt in November 1938, less than a week after Kristallnacht, the “Night of Broken Glass,” during which synagogues, homes, and Jewish-owned businesses across Germany were plundered and destroyed by the Nazis. They expressed outrage and asked the president to sever trade relations and declare an embargo on all “Nazi German goods.” Their telegram was just one of hundreds of telegrams and letters sent to U.S. government officials at the time expressing similar feelings of anger and dismay.

Telegram from 36 American Writers to President Roosevelt, 11/16/1938

via DocsTeach

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February 19, 1942: Franklin D. Roosevelt issues Executive Order 9066

The order provided for the designation of military areas (to be decided by the Secretary of War and commanders of the U.S. armed forces) from which “any or all persons” could be relocated. No specific ethnic groups or sections of the nation were singled out in the text of the order, but it stated that these new powers would serve as “protection against espionage and against sabotage”. In practice, it resulted in the internment of 120,000 Japanese-Americans, nearly two-thirds of whom were American-born citizens; smaller numbers of German- and Italian-Americans were interned as well, but no ethnic group was targeted by the government to the extent that the Japanese were. 

Virtually every Japanese-American living on the West Coast was interned, while a small fraction of those living in Hawaii - just over a thousand - suffered the same fate. The justification for the executive order was practical; it was believed that many Japanese, Issei and Sansei alike, could not possibly remain loyal to the United States if it went to war with Japan. It was outwardly practical (the Ni’ihau Incident seemed to prove American suspicions), and it was deeply rooted in racial prejudice. Many white farmers were glad to see their Japanese competition uprooted and displaced; several newspapers printed opinion pieces that supported wholeheartedly the internment based on their own personal feelings toward the Japanese; the American public (including even Theodore Geisel/Dr. Seuss) generally supported the move; and the Supreme Court, the ultimate defender and interpreter of the U.S. Constitution, upheld the constitutionality of the executive order in Korematsu v. U.S. (also see: Hirabayashi v. U.S.).  Camps were run by the Wartime Civil Control Administration and the War Relocation Authority; the largest of these by population were Tule Lake and Poston, but the most well-known today is Manzanar.

Some Japanese-Americans escaped internment by volunteering to serve in the U.S. Army, and many of them served in the famous 442nd Infantry Regiment, a unit that fought in Europe after 1944. Ironically, while many of its members’ families remained interned at home based on widespread racism and suspicions of disloyalty, this all-Japanese unit eventually became the most decorated infantry regiment in the history of the U.S. Army: twenty-one of its members were awarded the Medal of Honor. 

Executive Order 9066 was eventually rescinded in 1976, and surviving Japanese internees received payments and apologies from the U.S. government in the 1990s. But money paid four decades later could not compensate for the time lost in the camps; the businesses, homes, farms, and other property sold last-minute at ridiculously low prices by their owners or vandalized and destroyed in their absence; and the humiliation and disillusionment at having been denounced by their own countrymen and rounded up by their own government. 

Images compiled by The Atlantic

[via Zinn Education Project]:

On Dec. 17, 1944, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Korematsu v. United States that the denial of civil liberties based on race and national origin was legal. Fred Korematsu (Jan. 30, 1919 – Mar. 30, 2005), a U.S. citizen and the son of Japanese immigrants, had refused to evacuate when President Roosevelt ordered the internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII. Korematsu was arrested, convicted, and sent to the Topaz Internment Camp in Utah. Korematsu unsuccessfully sued the U.S. government for violating his constitutional rights.

Learn more from: (1) Tracked in America website: http://bit.ly/18O7xUL (2) Unsung Heroes lesson for middle and high school: http://bit.ly/1guKnub (3) Of Civil Rights and Wrongs: The Fred Korematsu Story: http://to.pbs.org/18O7Ajj (4) More stories of protest of the internment in the film Conscience and the Constitution: http://bit.ly/18O7Dvu

Image courtesy of Karen Korematsu and the Korematsu Institute

So President Teddy Roosevelt gave away Eleanor at her wedding but he also stole all her attention (not intentionally I don’t think). It was so bad that the only attention the couple could seem to get was when they gave Teddy a slice of their wedding cake or when he finally left the party all together. Which miffed FDR, while Eleanor didn’t mind because she was use to being pushed in the background at that point in her life.

In all honestly I just wanted to try drawing young  Roosevelts 

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February 19th 1942: Japanese internment

On this day in 1942 US President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed executive order 9066 which allowed the military to relocate Japanese-Americans to internment camps. Japanese-Americans were considered a national threat due the attack on Pearl Harbour which prompted the US to join World War Two. Other groups were also detained, but it was Japanese-Americans who were mostly targeted, with 120,000 being held in camps. In Korematsu v. United States (1944), the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the executive order. Those interned suffered great material and personal losses, with most losing a lot of property and some losing their lives to illness or the violence of sentries. The victims and their families eventually received an official government apology in 1988 and reparations began in the 1990s.

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"Your Dad has told me that you are a stamp collector and I thought you might like to have these stamps to add to your collection."

Letter from President Franklin Roosevelt to nine year old Bobby Kennedy on July 12, 1935

"I am going to frame your letter and I am going to keep it always in my room."

Reply to President Roosevelt from Bobby Kennedy on July 19, 1935

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Today is the Day of Remembrance for Japanese Americans Interned During WWII

On February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 granting the War Department broad powers to create military exclusion areas. Although the order did not identify any particular group, in practice it was used almost exclusively to intern Americans of Japanese descent.

Although there were no reliable reports that Japanese-Americans on the United States West Coast presented a subversive threat, on March 2, 1942 the military declared California, Oregon and Washington State strategic areas from which Americans of Japanese decent were to be excluded.

More than 110,000 Japanese-Americans (64% of whom were American-born citizens) were required to abandon their homes and jobs and to live in 10 relocation camps.

The United States Supreme Court finally ruled that continued detention without cause was unconstitutional, and the military relocation order was rescinded in December 1944.

Images: 

Japanese Americans near trains during Relocation. Circa 1942.

Baggage check during Japanese Relocation. Circa 1942.

Exclusion order posted at First and Front Streets in San Francisco directing removal of persons of Japanese ancestry from the first section of the city to be affected by evacuation. Evacuees will be housed in War Relocation Authority centers for the duration., ca. 07/1942.

Photograph of Dust Storm at Manzanar War Relocation Authority Center, 07/03/1942.

-from the FDR Library

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Who wants a Christmas tree?

One of the things many people don’t know about FDR is that he considered himself to be a tree farmer and this included growing and selling Christmas trees from his property in Hyde Park. In 1943 he shipped a Christmas tree to Winston Churchill via the U.S. Army.

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HISTORY’S THE WORLD WARS

In the 31 years between 1914 and 1945, over 100 million people were killed in the deadliest fighting the world has ever seen. The world wars were a time of ruthless tyrants, but also legendary heroes. An era when a single generation of men determined the fate of all mankind.

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October 11th 1884: Eleanor Roosevelt born

On this day in 1884 Eleanor Roosevelt was born in New York City. She married her cousin Franklin D. Roosevelt, the future President, in 1905. Eleanor was actively involved in her husband’s political career, and encouraged him to continue in politics after his partial paralysis from polio in 1921. Franklin was elected President of the United States in 1932 and served as President from 1933 until his death in 1945. Eleanor was a very active First Lady, openly campaigning for greater rights for women and African Americans. After FDR’s death, Eleanor was a US delegate to the United Nations, and chaired the UN Commission on Human Rights. In this capacity she oversaw the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Eleanor Roosevelt died in 1962 aged 78.