franklin-roosevelt

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Before 1939 no reigning British Monarch had ever set foot on American soil since America’s Independence in 1776. But that all changed when King George VI (the one that stutterer and has that movie kings speech made about him) was invited by FDR to visit. In hopes to win over the sympathy and support of the American people towards the UK for the inevitable war ahead. And it work Americans welcomed the royal couple heartily and came from all over to just get a glimpse of them. 

So I just wanted to draw the reserved slightly shy royal couple being unconformable and overwhelmed with the the american presidential overly friendly family’s big personalities.

[via Zinn Education Project]:

On Dec. 17, 1944, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Korematsu v. United States that the denial of civil liberties based on race and national origin was legal. Fred Korematsu (Jan. 30, 1919 – Mar. 30, 2005), a U.S. citizen and the son of Japanese immigrants, had refused to evacuate when President Roosevelt ordered the internment of Japanese-Americans during WWII. Korematsu was arrested, convicted, and sent to the Topaz Internment Camp in Utah. Korematsu unsuccessfully sued the U.S. government for violating his constitutional rights.

Learn more from: (1) Tracked in America website: http://bit.ly/18O7xUL (2) Unsung Heroes lesson for middle and high school: http://bit.ly/1guKnub (3) Of Civil Rights and Wrongs: The Fred Korematsu Story: http://to.pbs.org/18O7Ajj (4) More stories of protest of the internment in the film Conscience and the Constitution: http://bit.ly/18O7Dvu

Image courtesy of Karen Korematsu and the Korematsu Institute

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February 19th 1942: Japanese internment

On this day in 1942 US President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed executive order 9066 which allowed the military to relocate Japanese-Americans to internment camps. Japanese-Americans were considered a national threat due the attack on Pearl Harbour which prompted the US to join World War Two. Other groups were also detained, but it was Japanese-Americans who were mostly targeted, with 120,000 being held in camps. In Korematsu v. United States (1944), the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the executive order. Those interned suffered great material and personal losses, with most losing a lot of property and some losing their lives to illness or the violence of sentries. The victims and their families eventually received an official government apology in 1988 and reparations began in the 1990s.

So President Teddy Roosevelt gave away Eleanor at her wedding but he also stole all her attention (not intentionally I don’t think). It was so bad that the only attention the couple could seem to get was when they gave Teddy a slice of their wedding cake or when he finally left the party all together. Which miffed FDR, while Eleanor didn't mind because she was use to being pushed in the background at that point in her life.

In all honestly I just wanted to try drawing young  Roosevelts 

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“Your Dad has told me that you are a stamp collector and I thought you might like to have these stamps to add to your collection.”

Letter from President Franklin Roosevelt to nine year old Bobby Kennedy on July 12, 1935

“I am going to frame your letter and I am going to keep it always in my room.”

Reply to President Roosevelt from Bobby Kennedy on July 19, 1935

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HISTORY’S THE WORLD WARS

In the 31 years between 1914 and 1945, over 100 million people were killed in the deadliest fighting the world has ever seen. The world wars were a time of ruthless tyrants, but also legendary heroes. An era when a single generation of men determined the fate of all mankind.

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October 11th 1884: Eleanor Roosevelt born

On this day in 1884 Eleanor Roosevelt was born in New York City. She married her cousin Franklin D. Roosevelt, the future President, in 1905. Eleanor was actively involved in her husband’s political career, and encouraged him to continue in politics after his partial paralysis from polio in 1921. Franklin was elected President of the United States in 1932 and served as President from 1933 until his death in 1945. Eleanor was a very active First Lady, openly campaigning for greater rights for women and African Americans. After FDR’s death, Eleanor was a US delegate to the United Nations, and chaired the UN Commission on Human Rights. In this capacity she oversaw the creation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Eleanor Roosevelt died in 1962 aged 78.

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Letter from Fidel Castro to President Franklin D. Roosevelt, 11/06/1940 

Item from Records of the Foreign Service Posts of the Department of State. (03/05/1923 - 01/1961)

This letter from tweleve year-old Fidel Castro congratulates President Roosevelt on his re-election and asks the president to send him a ten dollar bill. Presidents receive hundreds of thousands of letters every year from children and adults sharing their concerns and well-wishes with him. 

Source: http://go.usa.gov/j82k

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Get out of the “Funk” that is the “Great Depression”!

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Sept. 26, 1937: Some 5,000 patriots came out to Mount Rushmore in September 1937 to see the unveiling of Abraham Lincoln’s face, measuring “66 feet from chin to crown,” the same height as his fellow granite presidents Washington and Jefferson (Theodore Roosevelt’s head would be dedicated in 1939). Coincidentally, when the “Shrine of Democracy” was presented, on the 150th anniversary of the Constitution’s signing, The New York Times’s lead story concerned another President Roosevelt’s not-quite-so-constitutional court-packing scheme. Photo: The New York Times

December 11, 1941: Germany and Italy Declare War on the United States

On this day in 1941, Nazi Germany’s Adolf Hitler and Fascist Italy’s Benito Mussolini declared war on the United States in support of their ally, the Empire of Japan. The U.S. government responded by quickly passing resolutions of war against the two Axis powers. 

Although the United States had previously claimed neutrality in Europe, these declarations led America into the European conflict of World War II. Three days prior, President Franklin Roosevelt had declared war against the Empire of Japan, the third Axis power, following the attack at Pearl Harbor. 

Explore Ken Burns’s timeline of World War II to discover the most important and consequential events of this global conflict.

Photo: President Roosevelt signing the declaration of war against Germany, Dec. 11, 1941 (Library of Congress).