forestwander

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Forestwander

Directed by George Adamson

This short film/video pushed my film-making and cinematography to be efficient in creating a dynamic and visually-pleasing film. This film shows an example of my highest abilities in Cinematography and Editing, whilst remaining completely low-fi in terms of production value.

I will be able to replicate this look and feel for Wedding, Corporate and Events Videography, as well as Music Videos and Short Films. I excel at working efficiently when working with limited time. I learned more about my style of film-making during the making of this film than any other shoot I have been on yet.

Special Thanks to Elizabeth Grace for appearing in this film.

Autumn flowing forest river

Late in the afternoon after hiking down into the bottom of this gorge (about 5 or 6 miles) we are blessed to see the further most lower falls of White Oak Gorge. This photo does not do the autumn scenery justice, it is truly a blessing to see the forest river flowing through the colorful autumn landscape, and it was well worth it. ForestWander Nature Photography

This photo by www.ForestWander.com has been shared on Nature and Travel Tumblelog from Flickr via Ifttt.com

Through a series of ingenious experiments examining gene expression, scientists made quite an incredible discovery concerning the evolution of insect wings. Basically, they concluded that  insect wings may have evolved from the gills of an ancient aquatic creature. It’s fascinating to think that the patterned wings of the butterfly could evolve from a body part originally used for breathing underwater!

Photo by ForestWander.com (CC)

See: Damen, W (2002), Diverse Adaptations of an Ancestral Gill: A Common Evolutionary Origin for Wings, Breathing Organs, and Spinnerets, Current Biology, Vol 12, Issuse 9, 1711–1716.

"We’re all Homo sapiens — thinking men and women — but in a world that faces an uncertain future of habitat destruction, climate change, and ecological catastrophe, perhaps it’s time we became Eco sapiens."

www.ecosapien.org