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GORDON PARKS’ 1950S PHOTO ESSAY ON CIVIL RIGHTS-ERA AMERICA IS AS RELEVANT AS EVER

An exhibition of Parks’ rare color photographs, entitled “Gordon Parks: Segregation Story,” will go on view this fall at The High Museum of Art in Atlanta. The photos capture a particularly disturbing moment in American history, captured via the lives of an African American family, the Thorntons, living under Jim Crow segregation in 1950s Alabama. See all of the photos here.

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Beth Hoeckel

These gently apocalyptic images are mixed media collages by artist Beth Hoeckel. The dreamlike quality draws you into another world of a futuristic past. An impression of the future reflecting on a bygone era. A 1950’s futurism study.

They are brilliantly entising, you wonder about the situation, the story behind the collated image.

As though you have jumped into a famous five or secret seven story, but way better.

All images from her website here.

Marilyn was frightened, insecure—trusted only her coach and was always late. During our scenes she’d look at my forehead instead of my eyes; at the end of a take, look to her coach, standing behind Jean Negulesco, for approval. If the headshake was no, she’d insist on another take. A scene often went to fifteen or more takes, which meant I’d have to be good in all of them as no one knew which one would be used. Not easy—often irritating. And yet I couldn’t dislike Marilyn. She had no meanness in her—no bitchery. She just had to concentrate on herself and the people who were there only for her. I had met her a few times before, and liked her. Grable and I decided we’d try to make it easier for her, to make her feel she could trust us. I think she finally did.

- By Myself by Lauren Bacall

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