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Faderhead — Melt Into Your Eyes

+Lyrics:

Sometimes I’m just lost for words
And I don’t know what to say
This feels so good it almost hurts
Hope we’ll never fade away
When I look at you today
There’s nothing else that I gotta say
Cause I melt into your eyes again
If I need to lose control
I know that you will hold my soul
Deep inside I feel this glow
"You" and "me" will make "us" whole

Formalhaut--Inagaki Taruho (Intro + Part 1)

I’ve elected to take on a translation project as part of my summer work for my Japanese degree, and I had the thought that in case anyone was interested in reading it, I could share my work as I go along~ ^^ Tbh, I don’t know if anyone will be interested, but I figured it couldn’t hurt. Also that it would be nice to upload some original content to Tumblr for a change instead of just reblogging everything…^^;;;

So yeah, I’m going to give this a shot. :D I figured I’d post a page at a time, so as there are 20 pages, there’ll be 20 installments in total. I don’t claim to possess fluency, as I’m sure my translations will reveal. I’ve only been studying Japanese formally for about three years, and while I’d like to think I’ve come a long way in that time, I know I still have a long way to go. ^^; My hope is that someone more proficient in the language than I am will come along and offer their input, but for now I’m content to just post and share it~

Lol, I don’t really know anything about this story other than the title (and even that was a pain in the butt to translate. Elaboration to follow.)—I picked it at random from a collection of short stories written by Inagaki Taruho (1900-1977), a Japanese writer who grew up in the “trendy, international” city of Kobe, and whose works centered primarily around the themes of flight, astronomical objects, machinery/inventions, and shōnen-ai. He also likes to play around with languages, which is evident in the title of the piece I’ve chosen to translate. “Formalhaut” is the English romanization of an Arabic word that carries the literal meaning of ‘whale’s mouth’ and is the name of a star in the constellation Pisces. It was written in the text in Chinese, and I have yet to determine why. xD

While there have been no mentions of whales or stars thus far, the story does get off to a very interesting start~ I’m only one page in so far, but based on what I’ve seen so far of the subject matter, I’m very intrigued to see where the story progresses next. :D

So without further adieu, Inagaki Taruho’s ‘Formalhaut,’ part 1:

千草に彩られた洛北乳母ヶ里へ、ある日黒塗のセダンが着いた。大原女らも覚えず足並をとどめるような、いと清らかな、年の比十二、三の少年が送られてきたのである。さてこの近くに久しく無住の荒れ果てたの寺があった。ある午後遅く、かの少年が、好奇心に誘われるまま山門を入って行くと、銀杏の落葉に埋もれた所に人の気配がして、眇の老僧が立現われて物云いかけた。以来少年の姿は何処にも見えなくなってしまう。(一族の心痛、師匠の悲歎、凡ゆる手段を尽した捜索も遂にその甲斐が無かった。)*話変って、東京駅を発った下り一、二等急行列車がどの駅にも停らぬという椿事が持ち上がった。非常ベルが鳴り響いて、大慌

てに他の列車が待避線に廻された。東海道線前線に花火を飛ばして疾駆を続けた列車は、大阪を過ぎると、漸く速力を緩め出して、ついに神戸駅のプラットフォームに静々と停止した。ところが、機関車には誰も乗っていない。続く車輛もがら明きである。けれども明々と灯の点いた機輛目かの寝台車の床上に、行きがた知れずになっていた少年が、真裸のまま血塗れになって死んでいた。そしてこれを取巻いて、姿かたち寸分も違わぬ十二人の坊様が、黄色いあぶくを吹いて事切れていた。此処に作者と「青頭巾」の作者上田秋成との短い対話が差挟まれて、おしまいになる。

One day a black sedan arrived in Ubakeri in northern Kyoto, at a time when the town was bursting with the colors of flowers in full-bloom. A stylish, well-dressed young man of twenty-two or twenty-three emerged, and he walked intently, at a pace to avoid being seen by even the busybody women of the Ōhara household. Nearby there was a dilapidated temple that had long been without a priest. Late in the afternoon, drawn by curiosity, the young man passed through the temple gate. Sensing a sign of life among the fallen ginkgo leaves, a cross-eyed old monk emerged and called out to him, but the man had already disappeared from sight. (The monk searched the man’s heart for what could have brought him there, whether family anguish, grief for an old master, or something else, but his efforts were in vain.)*

To change the subject, I was riding a split-level express train south from Tokyo Station, and for some reason it sped past all the stops along the way. The emergency alarm went off, and there was a great commotion as we changed to another train waiting on a sidetrack. The Tōkaidō lines take off down the track with a burst of fireworks, and the train I continued my journey on picked up speed as it passed through Ōsaka before finally rolling to a stop at the platform at Kōbe Station, even though there was no one in the engine car. Not only that, but the train was more or less empty by this point. Except for the floor that housed the sleeping cars, where the lights were still lit, and the naked corpse of a young man laid in a pool of blood. Wherever he’d planned on riding the train to wouldn’t be his destination now… Surrounding the poor soul were twelve monks who seemed to be in the same situation, emitting yellow foam from their lips post-mortem. Ah, but I’m being pulled into a conversation with Ueda Akinori, author of, “The Blue Kerchief,” and must bring my story to an end here.

*Text in brackets denotes passages where I’m very unsure of the accuracy of my translation. ^^;

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