Apple said Wednesday night that it is making it impossible for the company to turn over data from most iPhones or iPads to police — even when they have a search warrant — taking a hard new line as tech companies attempt to blunt allegations that they have too readily participated in government efforts to collect user information.

The move, announced with the publication of a new privacy policy tied to the release of Apple’s latest mobile operating system, iOS 8, amounts to an engineering solution to a legal quandary: Rather than comply with binding court orders, Apple has reworked its latest encryption in a way that prevents the company — or anyone but the device’s owner — from gaining access to the vast troves of user data typically stored on smartphones or tablet computers. …

“This is a great move,” said Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the American Civil Liberties Union. “Particularly after the Snowden disclosures, Apple seems to understand that consumers want companies to put their privacy first. However, I suspect there are going to be a lot of unhappy law enforcement officials.”

Ronald T. Hosko, the former head of the FBI’s criminal investigative division, called the move by Apple “problematic,” saying it will contribute to the steady decrease of law enforcement’s ability to collect key evidence — to solve crimes and prevent them. …

“Our ability to act on data that does exist . . . is critical to our success,” Hosko said. He suggested that it would take a major event, such as a terrorist attack, to cause the pendulum to swing back toward giving authorities access to a broad range of digital information.

He suggested that it would take a major event, such as a terrorist attack, to cause the pendulum to swing back toward giving authorities access

Who are the real terrorists?

2

Just a couple weeks ago, we had written about a federal lawsuit concerning whether or not the Justice Department needs a warrant to put a tracking device on cars. In a very prescient manner, a bunch of our commenters started discussing what would happen if they found such a device on their car, and whether or not it would be legal to remove it. Well, now we have a case of exactly that happening.

Apparently a guy named Yasir Afifi, who lives in Silicon Valley, discovered a strange device on his car, when he took it in for an oil change. The friend he was with took some photos and posted them to Reddit, asking if it meant the FBI was after them… or if it was a bomb:

Lots of people in the thread quickly confirmed that it was a tracking device, made by a company who only sold to law enforcement. Then, to confirm things, a couple of days later, the FBI showed up to demand he return the device.

https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20101008/03035211331/guy-finds-fbi-tracking-device-on-car-posts-pics-online-fbi-shows-up-demanding-it-back.shtml

http://www.wired.com/2010/10/fbi-tracking-device/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%253A%2520wired27b%2520%2528Blog%2520-%252027B%2520Stroke%25206%2520%2528Threat%2520Level%2529%2529

Ya sabeis que Trotuguete, junto con los demás peluches, nos pasan la información de lo que pasa en la casa de Willy y de Vegetta, nos ha querido enviar una foto de como va el funcionamiento del F.B.I. de Tumblr, esperemos que el material llegue sano y salvo a las oficinas más cercanas, a todo esto, corto y cierro.

-Foto hecha por Trotuguete-Agente023

Y esto es el resultado de mi idas de olla en noches pasadas :V

2

Q. Was the cannibalism a sexual gratification too?

A. It was. It started out as an experimentation. Made me feel like they were more a part of me.

Q. (That’s interesting.)

A. So it did give me some satisfaction and there was some gratification.

Q. (How would you prepare it?)

A. Uh…on the stove, on the skillet, uh, just like you prepare a regular piece of meat, they’d be, uh, cut into, you know, sizes that were small enough to eat.

Q. (Any other organs?)

A. Hearts, liver, thigh meat, biceps, biceps…

Q. (How did it taste?)

A. Uh…there’s no way of saying it without sounding, uh…gruesome…

Q. (I don’t find it offensive.)

A. Well, it…I, I don’t know how to describe it. You’ve had filet mignon, haven’t you?

Q. Uh huh, that’s one of my favorites.

A. Yeah. Very tender…

Source: Freedom of Information and Privacy Acts, Federal Bureau of Investigation

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