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All my little pumpkins all in a row. My wife laughs at my obsession with them, especially since we have no eggs to make pies, but they don’t take much of my time.

On a different note. I have acquired a cohort of archers. Without any sheep in the region all string we have found has had to be saved for beds and other necessities, but now we finally have enough for archers. We have been collecting arrows from the bodies of our foes as we defeat them, so we have those in reserve, but now we can finally return fire, arrow for arrow.

Keep Fighting internet

7
Finding Quiet Moments on Local Farms with @wings_of_tin

For more lush portraits of life on small farms, follow @wings_of_tin on Instagram.

“Farming is the dedication of your life to the stewardship of plants from seed to harvest, for better or for worse, in good weather or bad, through pest and disease, at all hours,” says Nikki Seibert (@wings_of_tin). “All of this back-breaking and often heart-wrenching work is done to provide food for family, friends and neighbors.”

Nikki spends almost every day working with local farms in Charleston, South Carolina, where she runs a sustainable agriculture program for organic farmers.

“I’m a ‘farmer of farmers’,” she jokes. “A childhood filled with outdoor adventures, hardworking parents, and countless hours spent building, growing and fixing things created the trifecta for me to end up in a career in agriculture.”

Nikki uses Instagram to showcase her favorite colorful crops and the green, flourishing landscapes of the farmlands she visits.

“I hope my pictures show how important it is to support the people and places that make your community unique,” she says. “Also, how much I love playing in the dirt.”

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Hold the phone, there’s even more going on in the world of wonderfully weird produce than we thought. Last month we shared the discovery of incredibly creepy “happy/joyful doll pears" in a Beijing supermarket. Today we learned that Chinese farmers aren’t just growing spooky blissed-out babies. They’re also growing green bottle gourds, called Hulu (葫芦) in Chinese, that are shaped like Chairman Mao, Jesus, Santa Claus, Maitreya, the God of Fortune, a fire-breathing dragon and more.

According to a spot on Youku, a man named Xie Lyu Zhi visited the Thousand Year Temple in Sichuan, China and a Buddhist monk told him a dream he had about a gourd shaped like a famous deity. Xie decided this meant he should create artistic gourds.

Like the nightmare pears, these gourds are shaped by growing them inside plastic molds. In China, bottle gourds are very auspicious symbols, associated with good fortune, happiness and good health. These molded gourds appear to be an evolution of the long-standing tradition of decorating the gourds by carving and painting them.

Visit RocketNews24 for additional images.

[via Kotaku and RocketNews24]

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Mark Bittman on what’s wrong with food in America

In an interview with Vox, Mark Bittman discusses how our industrial system of food production has led to cheap food filled with calories, but with very little nutrition. It’s a problem that needs to be addressed to prevent a health crisis.

Vox: What are things in society that need to tip for these to become more mainstream issues?

Bittman

1. The more research we see about added sugars, the more we’ll see how damaging it is.

2. An outbreak of antibiotic resistant bacteria linked to overuse of antibiotics in animal production.

3. Confined animal feeding operations. We’re finally seeing how poorly animals are treated.

Researchers across the University of California system are working to address these issues.

Jered Lawson and Nancy Vail, graduates of UC Santa Cruz and UC San Diego, have formed Pie Ranch, a farm that teaches urban high school students about where their food comes from.

Robert Lustig, a UCSF professor of pediatrics said at a symposium on sugar and other sweeteners, “Enough people are sick that we need a societal and government intervention on the scale of that mounted against tobacco and alcohol.”

UCSF is eliminating antibiotic meats used in their cafeterias.

Annie King, an animal science professor at UC Davis, explains the difference between cage-free, free-range, and many other egg terms found at the grocery store.

Earlier this summer, University of California President Janet Napolitano and chancellors from all 10 campuses announced an initiative to tackle these problems on a global scale by harnessing the collective power of UC to help put the world on a path to sustainably and nutritiously feed itself.

Learn more about the UC Global Food Initiative

OK GUYS

remember pumpkin online? remember that fab black female director? remember spoons theory island? remember nonbinary genders and all kinds of love?

they got fully funded

BUT

in order or them to be able to implement polyamory they need to hit 40,000 bucks

last i checked they were at like 34000

they have a little over 10 hours.

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE SIGNAL BOOST DONATE THIS IS YOUR LAST CHANCE. THIS IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT TO A LOT OF PEOPLE. I REALLY WANT TO BE ABLE TO DATE ALL MY BOYFRIENDS ON THIS GAME (and maybe some npcs too!)

REBLOG DONATE SIGNAL BOOST PLEASE JUST DO WHAT YOU GUYS CAN! THANK YOU SO MUCH!

pumpkinonline you guys are amazing, keep doing what youre doing!

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