fantasy literature

Then of course I like to think I enjoy writing/reading monster fights because 1) monsters are cool 2) it involves more imagination/creativity and 3) believe it or not, I don’t love the idea of people killing other people.

But then I wonder if I just say that because it could be seen as “lazier” than writing people fight.

7

When J.R.R. Tolkien wrote The Hobbit, he was already an accomplished amateur artist, and drew illustrations for his book while it was still in manuscript. The Hobbit as first printed had ten black-and-white pictures, two maps, and binding and dust jacket designs by its author. Later, Tolkien also painted five scenes for color plates, which comprise some of his best work. His illustrations for The Hobbit add an extra dimension to that remarkable book, and have long influenced how readers imagine Bilbo Baggins and his world.

I have found The Art of The Hobbit book here in Amazon. Some of these images are published here for the first time, others for the first time in color, allowing Tolkien’s Hobbit pictures to be seen completely and more vividly than ever before.

(amazon.com)



Back when I was a studying biology, I noticed that a lot of anatomical terms sound like they come straight from Middle Earth. So, to celebrate the release of the last Hobbit film, I’ve created this INCREDIBLY nerdy quiz.

Do these words and phrases refer to parts of the human body, or reference people and places from J. R. R. Tolkien’s work?

  1. Antrum of Highmore
  2. Crypt of Morgagni
  3. Caves of Androth
  4. Lobelia
  5. Loop of Henle
  6. Scapha
  7. Great Vein of Galen
  8. Halls of Mandos
  9. Groin
  10. Gap of Calenardhon
  11. Macewen’s Triangle
  12. Canal of Schlemm
  13. Gerontius
  14. Islets of Langerhans
  15. Meckel’s Cave
  16. Chamber of Mazarbul

You shall not pass.

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Bitch Magazine Series: Girls of Color in Dystopian YA Fantasy Literature

This current guest series by Victoria Law includes book reviews, analysis of race and tends in YA literature, questions about race and gender in Dystopic narratives, interviews with authors and more.

2

Lit. Meme - 3 Genres: High Fantasy

Notable Authors: J. R. R. Tolkien, C. S. Lewis, G.R.R. Martin 

High fantasy is defined as fantasy fiction set in an alternative, entirely fictional (“secondary”) world, rather than the real, or “primary” world. The secondary world is usually internally consistent but its rules differ in some way(s) from those of the primary world. By contrast, low fantasy is characterized by being set in the primary, or “real” world, or a rational and familiar fictional world, with the inclusion of magical elements.

These stories are often serious in tone and epic in scope, dealing with themes of grand struggle against supernatural, evil forces.

[continued]

7

We might have mentioned before how much we love science fiction, and the fact that this year’s summer reading theme is Science. Actually: Science!! It needs an exclamation point. 

So, we’ve put together a really, really, incredibly huge booklist (working title? The Hive) for fans of science and fantasy fiction - and we added a little something extra, since, if you’re anything like us, when you love reading a genre, you love to watch films and shows, and play video games, in that same genre. 

And if you’re playing Reading Bingo this summer with us for Summer Reading - or if you’re planning to take part in our Summer Fling (With a Book)! matchmaking program - then these books will definitely see you through summer and beyond!

I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes.

Because if you are making mistakes, then you are making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You’re doing things you’ve never done before, and more importantly, you’re Doing Something.

So that’s my wish for you, and all of us, and my wish for myself. Make New Mistakes. Make glorious, amazing mistakes. Make mistakes nobody’s ever made before. Don’t freeze, don’t stop, don’t worry that it isn’t good enough, or it isn’t perfect, whatever it is: art, or love, or work or family or life.

Whatever it is you’re scared of doing, Do it.

Make your mistakes, next year and forever.

—  Neil Gaiman.

Yesterday we saw bookriot's post of read-alikes for Robin LaFevers’s His Fair Assassin trilogy and were so, so excited: one, because that’s one of our favorite YA series, ever, and two, because the list features Jennifer McGowan’s Maids of Honor books - Jennifer will be here tomorrow for our next NaNoWriMo workshop, talking publishing and critiquing short pieces, and we can’t wait! 

Naturally, that got us thinking about some of our other favorite YA novels in which thieves, spies, and assassins appear, so here’s a small compilation of historical, fantasy, and historical fantasy fiction for your weekend reading! 

Maid of Secrets and Maid of Deception, Jennifer McGowan

Thieves

  • The Demon King, Cinda Williams Chima
  • Star Crossed, Elizabeth Bunce
  • Scarlet, A.C. Gaughen
  • Midnight Thief, Livia Blackburne
  • The Thief, Megan Whalen Turner
  • The Outcasts, John Flanagan
  • The False Prince, Jennifer A. Nielsen
  • Illusive, Emily Lloyd-Jones

Spies

  • Palace of Spies, Sarah Zettel
  • Etiquette & Espionage, Gail Carriger
  • Sekret, Lindsay Smith
  • Across a Star-swept Sea, Diana Peterfreund

Assassins

  • Graceling, Kristin Cashore
  • Throne of Glass, Sarah J. Maas
  • The Assassin’s Curse, Cassandra Rose Clarke
  • The Kiss of Deception, Mary E. Pearson

In 2008, BBC One Television debuted a fantasy TV series about Camelot called Merlin (also called The Adventures of Merlin ), set at the time when Merlin, Arthur and Guinevere were teenagers, before they became legends.

When the series debuted, viewers quickly noted the racially-diverse cast. Some criticized this multi-racial vision of British legend as “historically inaccurate” and “political correctness,” while others applauded it as a welcome twist which was more reflective of modern British society than the all-white Britain of ancient history.

But was historical Britain all-white? Were there any people of color in Britain during “Arthurian” times? (And what do we mean by “Arthurian” times anyway?)

In this lesson, we will investigate the racial composition of Roman & Medieval Britain, and how racial diversity was portrayed in medieval Arthurian legends.

— 

Black in Camelot: Racial Diversity in Historical England and Arthurian Legend (Fantasy and Sci-Fi in the Classroom)

VIEW OR DOWNLOAD the Lesson Plan Here!

Relevant Courses:

  • Writing/Literature
  • History, Classical/Medieval
  • Humanities, Western Civilization
  • Sociology
  • Anthropology/Archaeology

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Locate and Discuss historical and/or archeological evidence suggesting or disproving the presence of Africans in Roman and medieval Britain (and Europe)
  • Demonstrate awareness of the portrayal of people of color in medieval Arthurian literature
  • Discuss the portrayal of ethnic diversity in current Arthurian-themed television shows and films