fairy-wren

 WAI T I WAN TU ALL TO FEEL A LIL HAPPIE 

SO THERE’ S THIESE BIRDS CALLE D FAIR Y WRENS RIGHT AND THERE’S  LOTSO  DIFENRE TN  TYPES BUT THEY’ RE ALL PRETTY LOOOOOOOK

ANYWAY SO IN FAIRY  WRENS EVE RY BIRD FINDS A MATE AND THEY RAI SE THE CHI CK S TO GETHER AND HAVE A A TERRITORY TOGETHER

BUT IT’S REALLY COMMON FOR FAIRY WRENS TO CHEAT ON EACH OTH ER AND SOMEITMES HAVE SE X WITH BIRDS WHO ARE NOT THEIR SOCIAL MATE AND SO A LOT OF TTHE TIMES THE BIRD RAISING THE CHIKS IS NOT ACTULLY THEIR GENETIC FATHER

BUT I WAS READING A STUDY AND THEY CASUALLY MENTIONED

THAT MALES FROM SEVERAL SPECIES OF FAIRY WREN HAVE BEEN OBSERVED GOING ONTO THE TERRITORIES OF OTHER MALES TO WOO THEIR LADY BIRDS 

AND THEY BRING THE FEMALES LIL FLOWER PETALS AS A GIFT?????

IT’S RLY CUTE AND KIND OF SCANADLOUS BUT RL Y CUTE.  NOT ALL AUSTRALIAN ANIMALS WILL HURT U SOME OF THEM WILL JUST BRIN G U A LIL FLOWER PRESENT 

2

Baby fairy wrens must chirp a secret password to be fed

by Jon Bardin

The nestlings of splendid fairy-wrens don’t have much of a choice when it comes to listening to their mothers: The birds must reproduce a particular sound learned from their moms to be fed, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Current Biology.

The researchers, led by Sonia Kleindorfer of Flinders University in Australia, call the sound the bird’s “learned password.”

The team discovered the remarkable mother-chick ritual by chance when they noticed that the mothers were aiming calls at their eggs well before they hatched. So they set out to determine why. First, the researchers realized that the call made by the nestlings in order to be fed was different in each nest, suggesting it might be learned.

The pieces began to come together when the team also observed that each nest’s begging call — the password the nestlings need — was contained within the call that the mothers made to their unhatched eggs…

(read more: LA Times)         

(photos: T - uncreditted; B - Colombelli-Negrel et al. / Current Biology)

A Little Bird Either Learns Its Name Or Dies (NPR)

Biologist Daine Colombelli-Negrel, from Flinders University in South Australia, discovered that Superb Fairy-wren moms have a way to detect an imposter. When they lay their eggs, they wait nine days, and then park themselves by the eggs and start singing. They will sing and sing the same tune every four minutes, over and over for a week, and the chicks inside those eggs not only hear the tune, they commit it to memory.

Scientists call this an “incubation call" and Colombelli-Negrel found that these songs contain a special note that is, in effect, a familial password. When the embryonic chicks hatch and then begin to cry out for food, they will include that note in their begging calls, so the mother knows, "Ok, that one is mine."