f.a.-hayek

The argument for liberty is not an argument against organization, which is one of the most powerful tools human reason can employ, but an argument against all exclusive, privileged, monopolistic organization, against the use of coercion to prevent others from doing better.
—  F.A. Hayek
From the fact that people are very different it follows that, if we treat them equally, the result must be inequality in their actual position, and that the only way to place them in an equal position would be to treat them differently. Equality before the law and material equality are therefore not only different but are in conflict with each other; and we can achieve either the one or the other, but not both at the same time. The equality before the law which freedom requires leads to material inequality.
—  F.A. Hayek, The Constitution of Liberty
What our generation has forgotten is that the system of private property is the most important guarantee of freedom, not only for those who own property, but scarcely less for those who do not.

We shall never prevent the abuse of power if we are not prepared to limit power in a way which occasionally may prevent its use for desirable purposes
—  FA Hayek, the road to serfdom
The argument for liberty is not an argument against organization, which is one of the most powerful means that human reason can employ, but an argument against all exclusive, privileged, monopolistic organization, against the use of coercion to prevent others from trying to do better.
— 

F.A. Hayek

The Constitution Of Liberty

I think the Nobel Prize really changed Hayek

 Before the Prize: Hayek’s descent into despondency

He’s fairly new to being a public intellectual and he’s a little disheartened by the state of discourse

He’s getting more worried. He can’t believe a lot of what he’s been dealing with for the past couple decades. He’s considering ending it all.

Shortly before the Nobel. He’s fucking done. He doesn’t care at all anymore. His face says “Proffer whatever dumbass harebrained theory you want to throw at me, I’ve heard it all.”

Hayek After the Nobel Prize:

That’s a shit eating grin if I’ve ever seen one. He’s got his shiny award and his fuck you Prize money and he’s damn proud

Where Hayek once met constructivism and scientism with frustration and despair, now near the end of his life he has learned to laugh at the hubris of his intellectual opponents. Besides, serfdom won’t be his problem.

The power which a multiple millionaire, who may be my neighbor and perhaps my employer, has over me is very much less than that which the smallest functionaire possesses who wields the coercive power of the state, and on whose discretion it depends whether and how I am to be allowed to live or to work.
—  F.A. Hayek, “The Road to Serfdom”
The more men know, the smaller the share of all that knowledge becomes that any one mind can absorb. The more civilized we become, the more relatively ignorant must each individual be of the facts on which the workings of his civilization depends.
— 


F.A. Hayek

The Constitution of Liberty

There are no possible rules of a just distribution in a system where the distribution is not deliberately the result of people bringing it about. Justice is an attribute of individual action. I can be just or unjust towards my fellow man. But the conception of a ‘social justice’—to expect from an impersonal process which nobody can control, to bring about a just result—is not only a meaningless conception, it’s completely impossible. See, everybody talks about ‘social justice’, but if you press people to explain to you what they mean by ‘social justice’—what they would accept as just—nobody knows! I’m telling you because I’ve been trying for the last twenty years, asking people what really are you principles of ‘social justice’?
—  F.A. Hayek
Socialism has never and nowhere been at first a working-class movement. It is by no means an obvious remedy for the obvious evil which the interests of that class will necessarily demand. It is a construction of theorists, deriving from certain tendencies of abstract thought with which for a long time only the intellectuals were familiar; and it required long efforts by the intellectuals before the working classes could be persuaded to adopt it as their program.
—  F.A, Hayek (The Intellectuals and Socialism)